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Costa Rica

From left to right, Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado Quesada, Panamanian President Laurentino Cortizo, and Dominican President Luis Abinader wave during a welcoming ceremony prior to their meeting at the presidential palace in Panama City on Oct. 20, 2021.
From left to right, Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado Quesada, Panamanian President Laurentino Cortizo, and Dominican President Luis Abinader wave during a welcoming ceremony prior to their meeting at the presidential palace in Panama City on Oct. 20, 2021.

Can a New Central American Alliance Nudge Ortega?

Costa Rica’s next president will guide a pro-democracy pact with Panama and the Dominican Republic.

From left to right, three of Costa Rica’s presidential candidates—José María Figueres of the National Liberation Party, Lineth Saborío of the Social Christian Unity Party, and Fabricio Alvarado Muñoz of the New Republic party—participate in a debate in San José on Feb. 1.
From left to right, three of Costa Rica’s presidential candidates—José María Figueres of the National Liberation Party, Lineth Saborío of the Social Christian Unity Party, and Fabricio Alvarado Muñoz of the New Republic party—participate in a debate in San José on Feb. 1.

Costa Rica’s Boring Elections Are a Model for the World

No matter who wins, Sunday’s vote won’t make headlines abroad. That’s a good thing.

The United Nations emblem is seen in front of the United Nations Office in Geneva on June 8, 2008.
The United Nations emblem is seen in front of the United Nations Office in Geneva on June 8, 2008.

The End of Latin American Solidarity

The region once acted as a bloc in world affairs. But as Costa Rica’s bid to join the U.N. Human Rights Council shows, Venezuela’s ongoing disintegration is ripping it apart.

Venezuelan migrants walk along the border of Peru and Ecuador.
Venezuelan migrants walk along the border of Peru and Ecuador.

Don’t Let Venezuela Join the United Nations Human Rights Council

Costa Rica has announced its candidacy to stop Nicolás Maduro’s tyrannical government from winning a coveted seat at the U.N.

Wind mills of the National Power and Light Company in Santa Ana, Costa Rica, on Oct. 23, 2015. (Ezequiel Becerra/AFP/Getty Images)
Wind mills of the National Power and Light Company in Santa Ana, Costa Rica, on Oct. 23, 2015. (Ezequiel Becerra/AFP/Getty Images)

Costa Rica’s War on Climate Change

On the podcast: How a tiny Central American country became a leader in reducing carbon emissions.

10/01/2004 SECA-20041001-pag-1
10/01/2004 SECA-20041001-pag-1

The Data Sleuths of San José

How three scrappy Costa Rican reporters used the power of data to bring down a system of sleaze.

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