Cuba

Tourists visit La Clandestina, a private shop in Havana, on March 28, 2018. Entrepreneurs known as cuentapropistas and their employees represent 12 percent of the country’s work force—some 580,000 Cubans.

The End of Cuba’s Entrepreneurship Boom

It isn’t just Trump who has put the country’s small businesses under pressure. Díaz-Canel is after them, too.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez (L) speaks with Cuban President Fidel Castro (R) on 16 April, 1999,

Venezuelan Democracy Was Strangled by Cuba

Decades of infiltration helped ruin a once-prosperous nation.

Cubans attend a May Day rally in Havana on May 1.

Trump’s Cuba Sanctions Are a Mistake

Tightening the failed embargo will push Havana into the arms of Beijing and Moscow.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó arrives at a demonstration at Avenida Francisco de Miranda on May 1 in Caracas.

Will Guaidó’s Gamble Pay Off?

Venezuela’s opposition leader has failed to gain enough military support to oust Nicolás Maduro, and Washington’s policies aren’t helping him.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton in the White House in Washington on Oct. 3.

Bolton Is Building a Confrontational Latin America Strategy

The Trump administration is right to call out the region’s rogues for their destabilizing behavior.

A member of the national guard fires his shotgun at opposition demonstrators during clashes in Caracas on July 28, 2017. (Carlos Becerra/AFP/Getty Images)

The Perils of a Putsch in Venezuela

Encouraging a coup in Caracas will give Russia and China a foothold in the United States’ backyard.

Raul Castro talks with First Vice President Miguel Diaz Canel, during the homage for the 50th anniversary of Ernesto "Che" Guevara's death, in Santa Clara, Cuba, on Oct. 8, 2017. (YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)

Cuban Communism Is at Its Reform-or-Die Moment

The country’s first non-Castro president in over 50 years has only one path to legitimacy.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, left, and Cuban President Raul Castro in Havana, Cuba, on Dec. 14, 2017. (Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images)

Cuba Is Making the Crisis in Venezuela Worse

Putting pressure on Caracas means holding Havana accountable.

On this week's episode of The E.R. Podcast, the panel discusses the "sonic attacks" on the U.S. embassy in Cuba.

From Moscow to Havana: Secret Weapons and Diplomats

The “sonic attacks” in Cuba aren’t the first suspected instance of invisible attacks on U.S. diplomats.

The Cuban flag flies by the country's Washington, D.C. embassy in July 2015. / Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

U.S. Boots 15 Cuban Diplomats out of Washington

But the State Department says it’s not blaming Havana for “attacks” on U.S. diplomats’ health.

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U.S. Pulls Some Staff Out of Cuba After Bizarre Health Episodes

U.S. officials are at a loss as to what’s causing diplomats to go deaf in Cuba.

TOPSHOT - An old American car passes by the US Embassy in Havana on December 17, 2015. The United States announced Thursday the resumption of regular flights to and from Cuba, the latest step in a historic thaw in relations. "On December 16, the United States and Cuba reached a bilateral arrangement to establish scheduled air services between the two countries," the State Department said in a statement. / AFP / YAMIL LAGE        (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)

If Cuba Can’t Keep U.S. Diplomats Safe, What’s the Point of Normalizing Relations?

The Trump administration should immediately reduce the U.S. embassy in Havana to skeleton staff and order the same for the Cuban embassy in Washington.

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The Secret History of Diplomats and Invisible Weapons

The alleged use of a “sound weapon” against U.S. Embassy officials in Cuba harks back to a Cold War medical mystery.

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