Cyber

Maverick, an American shorthair, keeps his claw on the mouse as he uses a computer at a press preview for the Cat Fanciers’ Association show at Madison Square Garden in New York on Oct. 10, 2007. (Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet ‘Charming Kitten,’ the Iranian Hackers Linked to Air Force Defector

Monica Witt fled to Iran and was indicted for espionage—alongside an Iranian hacking luminary.

Freshly printed copies of the San Francisco Chronicle run through the printing press at one of the Chronicle's printing facilities in San Francisco on Sept. 20, 2007. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

You Can Hack This Headline for $200

Cybercriminals claim to be selling the ability to manipulate media outlets’ articles.

A woman holds a smartphone bearing an image of Russian President Vladimir Putin as pro-Kremlin supporters celebrate National Unity Day in central Moscow on Nov. 4, 2016. (Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images)

How Russia Is Strong-Arming Apple

Moscow is demanding control over users’ personal data.

The U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

New Bill Seeks to Energize American Cyberdiplomacy

Lawmakers argue the State Department needs to balance human rights and national security in cyberspace.

A billboard advertising Apple's iPhone security is displayed during the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Jan. 7. (David Becker/Getty Images)

Surveillance Is a Tech Problem, but It Requires a Policy Solution

Apple’s former security chief explains why he took a job with the ACLU.

Network cables are seen going into a server in an office building following a cyberattack that affected dozens of countries in Washington, D.C., on May 13, 2017. 
(Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

Can State’s New Cyber Bureau Hack It?

The U.S. State Department is working to stand up a new cybersecurity bureau, but it's hobbled by debates with lawmakers on its purpose and mandate.

Mexican drug trafficker Joaquín Guzmán Loera is escorted by marines as he is presented to the press on February 22, 2014, in Mexico City. (Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images)

Spy vs. Spy, El Chapo Edition

Joaquín Guzmán Loera loved spyware—and it ultimately did him in.

U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein speaks as FBI Director Chris Wray and Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers listen during a news conference to announce a China-related national security law enforcement action at the Justice Department in Washington on Dec. 20. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The United States v. Godkiller (et al.)

U.S. prosecutors indict two Chinese nationals in huge hacking campaign.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) walks with Sens. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.) to a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence closed-door meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on April 27, 2017.  (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Senate Bill Targets Chinese Economic Espionage

New measure would give U.S. prosecutors power to indict hackers working abroad.

Pedestrians walk past ATMs for the digital currency bitcoin in Hong Kong on Dec. 18, 2017.  
(Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the U.S. Sanction What It Can’t Find?

Authorities are trying to force bitcoin into the light but cryptocurrencies are only getting harder to trace.

Russian President Vladimir Putin appears on a computer screen in an internet cafe in Moscow on July 6, 2006. (Denis Sinyakov/AFP/Getty Images)

Battling the Bots

Analysts are increasingly using artificial intelligence to track Russian disinformation campaigns.

A person walks past a 12-story building alleged in a report on Feb. 19, 2013, by the internet security firm Mandiant as the home of a Chinese military-led hacking group after the firm reportedly traced a host of cyberattacks to the building in Shanghai's northern suburb of Gaoqiao. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

In Chinese Spy Ops, Something Old, Something New

Indictments reveal how Beijing mixes traditional spycraft with cyberespionage to steal U.S. technology.

A security official waits in front of the door of the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 17. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kingdom’s Hackers and Bots

Saudi Arabia is using cutting-edge technology to track dissidents and stifle dissent.

The Pentagon is seen from the air over Washington, D.C., on Aug. 25, 2013. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Many U.S. Weapons Systems Are Vulnerable to Cyberattack

Government watchdog says the Pentagon has not taken the threat seriously enough.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the CFE Arena during a campaign stop on the campus of the University of Central Florida in Orlando on March 5, 2016. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Trump Has a New Weapon to Cause ‘the Cyber’ Mayhem

The U.S. president and his advisor John Bolton want to take the gloves off in cyberspace—but experts worry offensive attacks could backfire.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

The Algorithms of August

The AI arms race won’t be like previous competitions, and both the United States and China could be left in the dust.

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Why the Military Must Learn to Love Silicon Valley

The U.S. Defense Department and big tech need each other—but getting along won’t be easy

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In Cyberwar, There are No Rules

Why the world desperately needs digital Geneva Conventions.

(Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy)

A Million Mistakes a Second 

Ultrafast computing is critical to modern warfare. But it also ensures a lot could go very wrong, very quickly. 

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The Rise of the Cyber-Mercenaries

What happens when private firms have cyberweapons as powerful as those owned by governments?

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