defense spending

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh on October 23, 2018. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Is the Next Saddam Hussein

In the 1980s, the United States embraced a brutal Middle Eastern tyrant simply because he opposed Iran. Washington should not repeat the same mistake today.

Soldiers of the 21st Motorized Infantry Brigade patrol in the streets of Buea, Cameroon on April 26, 2018.

The United States Can Stop Cameroon’s Brutal Crackdown

Washington must not ignore atrocities against the country’s Anglophones. It should use existing U.S. laws to force an end to the violence.

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Why the Military Must Learn to Love Silicon Valley

The U.S. Defense Department and big tech need each other—but getting along won’t be easy

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

This Davy Crockett will be displayed in the National Museum of the United States Army, under construction at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. (U.S. Army photo)

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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Words of War

Decrypting nine new military programs that will change the face of battle.

Steve Bannon, former White House Chief Strategist to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks at a debate at Zofin Palace on May 22, 2018 in Prague, Czech Republic.

The Nationalist Internationale Is Crumbling

Steve Bannon is trying to sell Trumpism to Eastern Europeans—but shared ideologies die hard when they run into economic and military realities.

Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel greets German Chancellor Angela Merkel for a working dinner in Brussels on July 11, 2018, during the NATO summit.

Europe Should Call Trump’s Bluff

Spending 4 percent of the EU’s GDP on defense would boost sagging economies and protect the continent at a time when U.S. leadership is lacking.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump, and British Prime Minister Theresa May at a NATO summit in Brussels on July 11. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Trump Fumed, but NATO Members Got What They Wanted

Think the NATO summit was a complete dumpster fire? Think again.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel chats with sailors of the German Navy while she visited the "Braunschweig" warship on January 19, 2016 in Kiel, Germany.

Trump Is Right About Germany’s Low-Energy Military

Berlin needs to spend more on defense, but the U.S. president's public demands are making it politically impossible.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, listens as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting at the White House in Washington, D.C. on May 17, 2018. (Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)

NATO Chief Worried About Fissures Between United States and Europe

In an interview with Foreign Policy, Jens Stoltenberg cautioned against a new arms race with Russia.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel walks past sailors of the German Navy while visiting the "Braunschweig" warship on January 19, 2016 in Kiel, Germany.

Merkel’s Military Revival

Germany is poised to become Europe’s first line of defense, but facing down a revanchist Russia will require more spending and better coordination among NATO allies.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg answers journalists' questions as he arrives to attend the 54th Munich Security Conference on Feb. 16. (Andreas Gebert/AFP/Getty Images)

If America Is First, Is NATO Second?

An interview with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg.

US Secretary for Defense James Mattis in Brussels on February 14, 2018. (VIRGINIA MAYO/AFP/Getty Images)

The Military’s ‘Readiness’ Scam Worked Again

The Pentagon always complains for more money – and politicians always eventually give in.

A U.S. Air Force 'Reaper' drone passes a C-130 cargo plane at an airbase in the Persian Gulf on Jan. 7, 2016. (John Moore/Getty Images)

America’s Military Is Choking on Old Technology

As its rivals invest in new military hardware, Washington is stuck refurbishing obsolete equipment.

U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis inspects honor guards during a visit to Jakarta on Jan. 23. (Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images)

Can Mattis Succeed Where His Predecessors Have Failed?

The 2018 National Defense Strategy has its priorities straight. But budgetary challenges could get in the way.

U.S. soldiers on M113 armored vehicles take part during the Warrior Strike VIII exercise at the Rodriguez Range on Sept. 19, 2017, in Pocheon, South Korea. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Mattis’s Defense Strategy Is Bold

The only problem is, it's not realistic about funding.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks at the State Department on April 19, in Washington, DC.  (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Rex Tillerson Is About to Make a Terrible Mistake

The knives are out for "F" at the State Department. The secretary should be strengthening rather than dismantling it.

A Department of Homeland Security official at a train station in Jersey City, New Jersey on February 7, 2006. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Trump Administration Seeks to Slash Counterterrorism Funding

On the chopping block: incident response teams, air marshals, and nuclear detection.

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