Democracy

Foreign Policy illustration/Anthony Kwan/Vernon Yuen/Miguel Candela/NurPhoto/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Will Hong Kong Flare Up or Flame Out?

How the protesters got here—and what will happen next.

A riot police officer advances during a demonstration in Sheung Wan on July 28, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

How China Lost Hong Kong

Compromise or crackdown are the only options left for Beijing.

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky looks on during a press conference after a meeting with president of the European Council at the European Council in Brussels on June 5.

Welcome to Ukraine’s Post-Post-Maidan Era

Ukraine’s president now has an unprecedented level of parliamentary support. What will he do with it?

Greta Thunberg attends the Youth for Climate march in Brussels on Feb. 21.  Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Members of the army carry a coffin covered with the Ethiopian flag in Addis Ababa on June 25, in preparation for the funeral service of the Chief of Staff of the Ethiopian National Defense Force, Seare Mekonnen, who was assassinated on June 22.

Abiy Ahmed’s Reforms Have Unleashed Forces He Can No Longer Control

Ethiopia’s prime minister oversaw the chaotic release of thousands of prisoners, including many ethnonationalist militants. His amnesty may now be coming back to haunt him.

Sudanese protesters demand civilian rule in Omdurman on June 29.

From Camel Herder to Dictator

With the rise of Hemeti, Sudanese politics has been turned on its head.

Members of the Arizona National Guard listen to instructions on April 9, 2018, at the Papago Park Military Reservation in Phoenix.

The Military Aren’t Heroes or Villains. They’re Us.

The gap between soldiers and civilians is hurting democracies.

An Orthodox priest and cadets of the Nakhimov naval academy take part in the opening ceremony for the start of a new academic year known as the "Day of Knowledge" in Saint-Petersburg, on September 1, 2018.

Russians Are Getting Sick of Church

Orthodox Christianity—and Vladimir Putin—are at the center of the country’s newest culture war.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Polish President Andrzej Duda speak with the media at the Oval Office in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 18, 2018.

Duda’s Ego Trip

The Polish president will try to convince Trump to send U.S. troops to his country. Congress should push Trump to resist.

Kazakh president-elect Kassym-Jomart Tokayev speaks to the media during a press conference at Ak Orda Presidential Palace in Nur-Sultan on June 10, 2019.

Kazakhstan’s Second-Ever President Can’t Tolerate Protest

Nazarbayev’s successor has an impressive foreign profile but a raft of domestic problems.

Women walk past a campaign billboard for Kazakh President and presidential candidate Kassym-Jomart Tokayev in Nur-Sultan on June 7 ahead of Kazakhstan's presidential elections.

Kazakhstan’s Fake Vote Might Wake Up Civil Society

The nominal resignation of a longtime autocrat has sparked new hopes.

A protester waves a Sudanese flag in Khartoum on May 17.

Washington Is Turning Its Back on Sudan

The United States should not abandon the Sudanese in their greatest hour of need.

A dissident student asks soldiers to go back home as crowds flood into  central Beijing on June 3, 1989.

Tiananmen Crushed Asia’s Wave of Rebellion

China's shadow darkens democratic hopes today.

A song and dance festival in Estonia in 2011.

Estonia’s Natural Experiment in Fighting Right-Wing Populism

Two models have emerged for dealing with a new nationalist government—but it’s not clear which will prove more effective.

Sebastian Kurz arrives at the Mozarteum University to attend a plenary session part of the EU Informal Summit of Heads of State or Government in Salzburg, Austria, on Sept. 20, 2018.

Conservatism’s Wunderkind Is Getting Swallowed by the Far-Right

Austria’s chancellor made a deal with populists, and it’s not going according to plan.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan emerges from the voting booth before casting his vote in the countries parliamentary and presidential election on June 24, 2018 in Istanbul, Turkey.

Turkish Democracy Can’t Die, Because It Never Lived

The country’s political system doesn't deserve the laments it’s recently received.

A man closes a voting station in Kinshasa ahead of counting the ballots after presidential elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on Dec. 30, 2018.

No Democracy Is an Island

If Washington thinks that affirming flawed votes and the leaders who benefited from them abroad isn’t harming the health of democracy at home, it is mistaken.

Donald Trump speaks at the NRA-ILA's Leadership Forum at the 146th NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits on April 28, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Loving Dictators Is as American as Apple Pie

Trump has embraced yet another strongman, this time in Libya. But it’s not just a personal failing—it’s a national tradition.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the US Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Disinformation Is Drowning Democracy

In the new age of lies, law, not tech, is the answer.

An Indonesian election commission worker arranges ballot boxes in preparation for the upcoming presidential and parliamentary elections in Surabaya on March 18. (Juni Kriswanto/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s at Stake in Indonesia’s Elections?

The world’s third-largest democracy goes to the polls.

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