Democracy

French President Emmanuel Macron speaks during a special address to the nation, his first public comments after four weeks of nationwide 'yellow vest' (gilet jaune) protests, on December 10, 2018 in Paris. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Macron’s Destiny to Be Hated

The French president can make all the concessions he wants, but he can’t make the public like him.

Far-right activists hold flares during a rally in support of martial law and cutting ties with Russia in front of the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev on Nov. 26. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Martial Law Is a Test. Will Ukraine’s Democracy Pass?

Ukraine’s parliament resisted President Petro Poroshenko’s call for an extended state of emergency—but the battle isn’t over yet.

A supporter of ousted Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe protests at a rally in Colombo, Sri Lanka on Nov. 15. (Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images)

Asia’s Oldest Democracy Takes a Hit

Political maneuvering by Sri Lankan President Sirisena won’t end well.

Former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili poses in front of the Erasmus Bridge in Rotterdam, Netherlands, on Feb. 14. (Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images)

Make Georgia Great Again

Georgia’s presidential election is a referendum on a government that has reversed its predecessor’s gains.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders supporters rally in Los Angeles on May 19, 2016, to bring attention to voter suppression in Nevada. (Frederic Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Why Is It So Hard to Vote in America?

Voter turnout lags in the world’s most powerful democracy.

A man leaves a voting booth at a polling station during parliamentary elections in Tbilisi, Georgia, on Oct. 8, 2016. (Vano Shlamov/AFP/Getty Images)

When Georgians Go Low, Other Georgians Go Lower

A young democracy in the Caucasus has adopted a very aggressive style of campaigning.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Oct. 23. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Isn’t Saudi Arabia’s First Fake Reformer

The United States has a long history of getting duped by Saudi leaders promising to change their country for the better.

Jair Bolsonaro, the president-elect of Brazil, casts his vote in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28. (Ricardo Moraes-Pool/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro Can’t Destroy Brazilian Democracy

Brazil’s new president is a throwback to its authoritarian past—but the country is more resilient than it used to be.

Brazilian Workers’ Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad campaigns on Oct. 27 in São Paulo. (Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)

‘Brazil Needs Peace and Not Hate’

Ahead of a runoff presidential election, Workers’ Party candidate Fernando Haddad spoke with Foreign Policy about Brazil’s future.

Demonstrators wave a British flag with European Union stars and European Union flags as they take part in a march calling for a People's Vote on the final Brexit deal, in central London on Oct. 20.

A Second Vote on Brexit Won’t Enhance Democracy. It Will Undermine It.

The elitist proponents of a “people’s vote” don’t care about the popular will. They only care about getting the outcome they want.

Members of the Cameroonian Gendarmerie patrol in Omar Bongo Square in Buea, Cameroon’s majority-Anglophone southwestern province’s capital, during a political rally for incumbent President Paul Biya on Oct. 3. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

Cameroon’s Paul Biya Gives a Master Class in Fake Democracy

One of the world’s most experienced autocrats has clinched another seven-year term by bending the rules of the game in his direction in ways both old and new.

A woman cooks beside her tent at a temporary shelter in Palu, Indonesia, on Oct. 9. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Indonesia’s Disaster Politics

The latest earthquake and tsunami could be a major setback for the country’s democracy.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration

America’s Elite Needs to Get Back in Uniform

Military service is a unifying force in a time of deep division.

People attend a demonstration against Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban on Sept. 16 in Budapest as the European Commission considered disciplinary action against Orban's policies. (Laszlo Balogh/Getty Images)

The End of Viktor Orban’s Peacock Dance

As the European Union takes long overdue measures to punish the Hungarian regime, the prime minister appears to be moving from rhetorical to real repression.

A supporter of Congolese leader Joseph Kabila holds a picture of the president outside Parliament in Kinshasa on July 19.

Did Kabila Just Bring Democracy to Congo?

The country’s strongman plans to step down, but the United States must tread carefully.

A vendor scurries for cover as soldiers disperse demonstrators in Harare on Aug. 1. Protests erupted in the Zimbabwean capital over alleged electoral fraud. (Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images)

Emmerson Mnangagwa’s Zimbabwe Is Old Wine in a New Bottle

The government’s crackdown proves that the ruling party will hold on to power by any means necessary.

Crown Prince Of Saudi Arabia Mohammad Bin Salman speaks during a bilateral meeting with U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis March 22, 2018 at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Is Weak, Weak, Weak

Saudi Arabia has started a crisis with Canada because it doesn't want to admit its own failings.

Protesters hold a banner reading "Stand up for decent Slovakia" during a protest in Bratislava, Slovakia, on June 22, 2018, four months after the murder of journalist Jan Kuciak and his fiancee.

Press Freedom Is Still Under Attack in Slovakia

A journalist’s murder shocked the country in February, but it hasn’t led to a more independent media.

The chairman of Turkey's  Republican People's Party (CHP), Kemal Kilicdaroglu (R), speaks with Muharrem Ince (L), as they attend the Party's 36th ordinary congress in Ankara, on February on 3, 2018.

Turkey’s Opposition Lost to Erdogan, Then It Lost Its Mind

Since the June election, the country’s various opposition parties have collapsed into chaos, leaving the president without a credible challenger.

Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega (L) delivers a speech beside Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo (R), president of the National Commission for Verification, Reconciliation, Peace and Justice of the Sandinista government, on November 03, 2008 in Managua. (MIGUEL ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

How a Nicaraguan Priest Made a Deal With the Devil

Catholic clerics have been on the frontlines protesting Daniel Ortega's bloody crackdown—but one of them also helped fuel his rise.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.