Democrats

The six leading Democratic candidates at the presidential primary debate at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, on Jan. 14.

In the Latest Democratic Debate, Finally, Some Foreign Policy 

With a trimmed-down field, Democratic hopefuls sparred over Iraq, Iran, military deployments, and the threat from climate change.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA - NOVEMBER 20: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)  (L), former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) (R) participate in the Democratic Presidential Debate at Tyler Perry Studios November 20, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. Ten Democratic presidential hopefuls were chosen from the larger field of candidates to participate in the debate hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Can the Democrats Reinvent Themselves in Time to Win in 2020?

The Democratic Party is still fatally divided over outdated ideologies, proving the left hasn't yet learned the lessons of its 2016 defeat or the recent walloping of Britain's Labour Party.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, former Vice President Joe Biden, and Sen. Bernie Sanders participate in a Democratic presidential debate in Atlanta, Georgia, on Nov. 20.

Democratic Frontrunners Are Wrong About Aid for Israel

Putting America’s annual $3.8 billion of military assistance to Israel on the chopping block makes for good politics. But it makes no sense for U.S. national security.

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, left, speaks with ranking member Doug Collins

Why Putin Is Smiling

Even if Russian intelligence didn’t orchestrate the near-total political dysfunction that led to Tuesday’s impeachment articles, things sure have gone the Kremlin’s way.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announces impeachment

Trump Faces Impeachment Vote

The move on partisan lines will set him up to be the first president in U.S. history to run for reelection after being impeached.

Candidate portraits by uli knörzer for Foreign Policy

For the 2020 Democrats, It’s America First, Too

The slate of Democratic candidates includes two Rhodes scholars, two ex-soldiers, and a former chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. But don’t count on them to resurrect a Pax Americana.

Rep. Debbie Lesko of Arizona speaks during a press conference alongside House Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington on Oct. 23.

Divided Lawmakers Still Unite Around Ukraine

Despite the impeachment inquiry, U.S. lawmakers on both sides insist their support for Ukraine against Russian aggression remains strong.

Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget,  speaks at the White House in Washington on March 22, 2018.

Trump’s Plan to Slash Foreign Aid Puts Humanitarian Programs in Jeopardy

Administration hopes to bypass Congress by running down the budget clock.

The stage for the first U.S. Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, on June 26,

Democrats Face a Defense Spending Conundrum

The U.S. foreign-policy establishment shouldn’t balk at pledges to roll back national security commitments.

John Kerry Campaigns With Ted Kennedy In Iowa

FP’s Guide to the 2020 U.S. Election Debates

Eight things to read before the candidates meet.

Indonesian workers transport ballot boxes for the upcoming general elections at the Bonto Matinggi village in Maros, South Sulawesi, on April 16. (Daeng Mansur/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

In recent days, Washington raced to decipher the Mueller report and Indonesian voters cast ballots at more than 800,000 polling stations.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walks with U.S. President Donald Trump during a break in their historic summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Don’t Let Democrats Become the Party of War

In their zeal to oppose any policy associated with Trump, the Democratic Party’s leaders in Congress are starting to sound like warmongers.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Chattanooga, Tennessee, on Aug. 15, 2015. (Jason Davis/Getty Images)

How Trump Stole the Democrats’ Best 2020 Foreign-Policy Stances

From trade to troop drawdowns, some Dem presidential contenders may have a hard time contrasting their views with the president’s.

A supporter of the Fatah movement carries a banner depicting U.S. President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at a rally in Nablus, the West Bank, on Jan. 3. (Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP/Getty Images)

Dear Democrats: Don’t Let Trump Kill the Two-State Solution

Here’s how the new Congress should buy time for Israeli-Palestinian peace under the next president.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a meeting in Helsinki on July 16. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s Bad for Trump Is Worse for Putin

The Kremlin can expect more sanctions and more investigations from a Democratic House.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders supporters rally in Los Angeles on May 19, 2016, to bring attention to voter suppression in Nevada. (Frederic Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Why Is It So Hard to Vote in America?

Voter turnout lags in the world’s most powerful democracy.

Rep. Ed Royce speaks during a conference on countering violent extremism, in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 23, 2017. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Rep. Ed Royce’s Failure to Hold Trump Accountable Is a Dereliction of Duty

The chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee should use his last year in office to reverse the unprincipled silence and moral weakness of Republicans in Congress.

TAMPA, FL - AUGUST 30:  Balloons drop as Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Republican vice presidential candidate, U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) take the stage after accepting the nomination during the final day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 30, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate during the RNC which will conclude today.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

America Should Let a Thousand Political Parties Bloom

With the two party system coming apart, the United States ought to take its cues from Europe.

US President Donald Trump waits for a dinner with Latin American and US leaders at the Palace Hotel during the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly September 18, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski        (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

I Would Vote for (a Sane) Donald Trump

As Republicans and Democrats abandon the middle ground, America’s two-party system is due for disruption.

The California State flag flies outside City Hall, in Los Angeles, California on January 27, 2017.
A campaign by Californians to secede from the rest of the country over Donald Trump's election is gaining steam with suporters given the green light to start collecting signatures for the measure to be put to a vote.


 / AFP / Mark RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

California Really Has What It Takes to Secede

But is America's largest state ready for the wars that would follow?