Diplomacy

The State Department's director of policy planning and new head of the Iran Action Group, Brian Hook, speaks during a press briefing at the State Department in Washington on Aug. 16. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

Pompeo’s Iran Strategy Gets New Team

The new Iran Action Group reassigns one of the most powerful behind-the-scenes officials at the State Department to work on Iran full time.

Gen. Charles de Gaulle leads a triumphant procession down Champs-Élysées as part of the celebration of the liberation of Paris. To the right of de Gaulle is Gen. Jacques-Philippe Leclerc, commander of the French Armored Division. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

Europe Needs Its Own Charles de Gaulle

There’s nothing wrong with today’s European Union that France’s legendary 20th-century leader didn’t see coming—and didn’t try to fix when he had the chance.

Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei adjusts his eye glasses after voting at a polling station in Tehran on March 14, 2008. (BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran Is Throwing a Tantrum but Wants a Deal

Despite its defiant warnings, Tehran will eventually negotiate with Donald Trump—as long as Vladimir Putin mediates.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in Washington on July 25. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Pompeo Ignores Plea From Diplomats With Children With Special Needs

Families say the State Department continues to curb benefits mandated by law.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attend the opening ceremony at the NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium, on July 11. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Trump Is the First President to Get Turkey Right

Good riddance to the so-called strategic relationship between Washington and Ankara.

An engraving at the French National Library shows the ratification of the Peace of Westphalia in Nuremberg, Germany, on June 16, 1650. (Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

Meet the Middle East’s Peace of Westphalia Re-enactors

Can a series of far-flung, high-level conferences bring peace to the Middle East by applying lessons from 17th-century Europe?

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad waves to members of the public from his car in the Presidential convoy on August 4, 2010 in Hamadan, Iran. (Photo by Iranian President's Office via Getty Images)

The Reincarnation of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

The former president was excommunicated from Iran’s political elite—but he’s using grassroots economic populism to revive his career.

Michelle Bachelet addresses the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 23, 2009.  (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

The Job of Human Rights Chief Isn’t What You Think

Michelle Bachelet has just been tapped as the U.N.’s high commissioner for human rights—but her predecessor’s experience should make her wary.

Then-Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves delivers a speech during a plenary session of the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, on Feb. 2, 2016.  (Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Should Look to What the United States Does—Not What Trump Says

Toomas Hendrik Ilves, Estonia’s former president, on what to make of U.S. foreign policy toward Russia.

White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner stands with U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley at a U.N. Security Council meeting on Middle East issues on Feb. 20. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Trump and Allies Seek End to Refugee Status for Millions of Palestinians

In internal emails, Jared Kushner advocated a “sincere effort to disrupt” the U.N.’s relief agency for Palestinians.

U.S. President Donald Trump talks with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Brussels on July 11. (Tatyana Zenkovich/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Hits Turkey With Sanctions Over Jailed Pastor

The measure will further sour ties between two NATO allies.

Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin, U.S. President Harry Truman, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the conference to negotiate the future of Europe after World War II in Potsdam, Germany on July 23, 1945. (AFP/Getty Images)

Why I Didn’t Sign Up to Defend the International Order

The world needs new institutions for a new era—and nostalgia for a past that never existed won't help.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with North Korean official Kim Yong Chol at the White House on June 1. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Washington Has to Learn Pyongyang’s Rules

Negotiating with North Korea is a tricky game, and the United States is already behind.

U.S. President Donald Trump discuss immigration issues during a meeting with Republican members of Congress and cabinet members at the White House on June 20. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Refugee Skeptic to Assume Key Role on Migration Issues at State Department

The shift is part of the Trump administration’s broader campaign to crack down on refugees and immigration.

A woman walks across a carpet ahead of the NATO summit in Brussels, on July 11, 2018. (GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT / AFP)

NATO Isn’t What You Think It Is

An attack on one isn't really an attack on all and four other misunderstood facts about the Western defense alliance.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Capitol Hill on July 25. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In Fiery Hearing, Pompeo Trades Barbs With Lawmakers

The secretary of state faces criticism, even from those in his own party.

U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis (R) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford (2nd L) listen to committee chairman Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) prior to a hearing before Senate Armed Services Committee October 3, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

There’s No Such Thing as ‘Traditional’ Republican Foreign Policy

Trump can't ruin the GOP's foreign-policy principles, because there aren't any to ruin.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, right, and Sam Brownback, the U.S. ambassador at large for international religious freedom, at a press event for the launch of the department's 2017 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom on May 29 in Washington. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Religious Persecution Is on the Rise. It’s Time for Policymakers and Academics to Take Notice.

“Under Caesar’s Sword,” a new book on the repression of Christians, sheds light on issues that officials from around the world have gathered in Washington to discuss.

The lights temporarily go out in the Cabinet Room as U.S. President Donald Trump talks about his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, during a meeting with House Republicans at the White House on July 17, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

RIP American Exceptionalism, 1776-2018

Donald Trump’s relationship with Russia marks an unprecedented turn in the history of U.S. foreign policy.

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