Dispatch

Migrants camp on the road in the vicinity of the Maljevac border crossing with neighboring Croatia, near the northern Bosnian town of Velika Kladusa, on Oct. 24, 2018. (Elvis Barukcic/AFP/Getty Images)

In Bosnia, a Migrant Way Station Is Becoming a Winter Prison

For years, the country remained untouched by the global migrant crisis, but now, even in a place where many people were once refugees, tensions are on the rise.

A prostitute waits for clients behind her window in the red light district of Amsterdam on Dec. 8, 2008.

It’s Legal to Sell Sex in Amsterdam, But Don’t Expect the Same Rights As Other Workers.

The famously permissive Dutch city is cracking down on prostitution, relocating sex workers, and discriminating against those employed in the industry.

Pro-Biafra supporters shout slogans in Aba, southeastern Nigeria, during a protest calling for the release of a key activist on Nov. 18, 2015. (Pius Utomi Ekepi/AFP/Getty Images)

Slouching Toward Secession in Nigeria

Apathetic voters are planning to boycott this weekend’s election—and may inadvertently boost the country’s most fervent separatists.

Princess Ubolratana of Thailand at the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France, in 2008. (Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)

Thai Politics Has a Princess but No Storybook Endings

With elections coming, the junta still fears the specter of Thaksin Shinawatra.

Retired Israeli Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz in the city of Rishon LeZion, south of  Tel Aviv, on Feb 1. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

The Bibi Slayer?

By advocating clean and courteous politics, a retired general is giving Netanyahu a run for his money.

Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as La Bestia in Las Patronas, Veracruz state, Mexico, to travel through Mexico to reach the United States on Aug. 9, 2018. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Isn’t Helping Refugees. It’s Depriving Them of Their Rights.

The humanitarian visas offered to migrants don’t allow them to work, study, or receive benefits while letting the Mexican government duck its responsibilities under international law.

Members of the mostly Kurdish People’s Protection Units, part of the Syrian Democratic Forces, gather in the Syrian town of Shadadi on Sept. 11, 2018. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Kurdish Commander Laments American Betrayal, Urges U.S. to ‘Be Loyal’

Trump’s plan to withdraw troops from Syria leaves U.S. ally at the mercy of old enemies.

Sayragul Sauytbay sits inside a defendants' cage during a hearing at a court in Zharkent, Kazakhstan, on July 13, 2018. (Ruslan Pryanikov/AFP/Getty Images)

She Fled China’s Camps—but She’s Still Not Free

Sayragul Sauytbay, the only person to have worked inside an internment camp in Xinjiang and spoken publicly about it, now faces an uncertain future in Kazakhstan.

Prime Minister-elect Adel Abdul Mahdi addresses the Iraqi parliament during a vote on the new government in Baghdad on Oct. 24, 2018. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Iraq’s Old Divisions Undermine Its New Prime Minister?

In his first hundred days on the job, Adel Abdul Mahdi has hit entrenched political roadblocks to choosing cabinet ministers and changing a system of political patronage.

Nayib Bukele (second from right), his wife, Gabriela Rodríguez (right), and Vice President-elect Félix Ulloa (second from left) celebrate after Bukele won the Salvadoran presidential election in San Salvador on Feb. 3. (Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

Can El Salvador’s New President Fix What’s Driving Citizens Out?

Nayib Bukele won in a landslide. Now, he needs new policies to reduce violence in his country.

An 11-year-old girl cares for her mother as she receives her first dose of chemotherapy at Jamhuriat Hospital in Kabul on July 15, 2017. When 38-year-old Fatema was diagnosed with breast cancer, it took her seven months to gather the money needed for her surgery, and she was forced to delay follow-up treatment until she could borrow money to pay for it. (Kiana Hayeri for Foreign Policy)

America Never Gave Afghan Women a Chance

Washington failed at the most promising path toward stability in Afghanistan: keeping the country’s women alive.

A fisherman holds a Spanish flag during a protest in the bay of Algeciras, near the Rock of Gibraltar, on August 18, 2013.

As Brexit Looms, the Rock Is in a Hard Place

In Gibraltar, a British territory, 96 percent of the population voted against Brexit, but they are also adamantly opposed to joint rule by Spain. It might be time to reconsider.

A woman walks past a currency exchange shop in Tehran's grand bazaar on Nov. 3, 2018.

Can a New Currency End Tehran’s Economic Woes?

The Central Bank of Iran wants to take four zeros off the rial—but redenomination won’t work miracles.

The opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks during a meeting with deputies, media, and supporters, organized by the National Assembly, at Plaza Bolívar de Chacao in Caracas on Jan. 25. (Edilzon Gamez/Getty Images)

Maduro’s Power in Venezuela Seems Stable, for Now

Despite the recognition by a wave of countries of the opposition leader Juan Guaidó as president, Maduro’s patronage of the military insulates him from the need to negotiate.

A man visiting the Hejaz train station near al-Ula, Saudi Arabia, on Jan. 4. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

The Other Magic Kingdom

Saudi Arabia is making a very risky bet that it can become an international tourist destination.

A man prays at the burial of a friend on January 16, 2018 in Nairobi, Kenya after al-Shabab militants stormed the Dusit hotel complex.

Al-Shabab Wants You To Know It’s Alive and Well

The brutal attack in Kenya is designed to show Washington and the world that the terrorist group is still a force to be reckoned with in East Africa.

Arab-Israelis—also known as Palestinian citizens in Israel—wave Palestinian flags at a Land Day demonstration in the village of Araba in the Galilee on March 30, 2018. (Jalaa Marey/AFP/Getty Images)

Palestinian in Israel

The population the government refers to as "Arab-Israeli" is increasingly embracing the term "Palestinian."

A Chinese police officer takes his position by the road near what is officially called a “vocational education and training program” in Yining, in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Detainees Are Trickling Out of Xinjiang’s Camps

House arrest or forced labor awaits most of those released so far in what may be a public relations ploy.

Vice-chairman of the Momentum party Anna Donath at a protest in downtown Budapest on Dec. 16, 2018. (Peter Kohalmi/AFP/Getty Images)

Hungary Finally Has an Opposition Worth a Damn

The country’s youngest party has united the left and right against Viktor Orban.

A Moroccan draped in the Berber, or Amazigh, flag shouts slogans while marching during a protest against the jailing of Al-Hirak or "Popular Movement" activists in the capital Rabat on July 15, 2018.

Morocco’s Crackdown Won’t Silence Dissent

Across the country, protesters are increasingly willing to criticize the government and the monarchy—even in the face of repression.

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