Dispatch

Protesters link arms to hold the line at a roadblock on the Ring Bridge in Beirut on Oct. 26.

To the Barricades in Beirut

Lebanese protesters are reappropriating roadblocks—long a mark of civil war-era division—as a symbol of unity.

Iraqi protesters clash with security forces at Baghdad's Khallani Square during ongoing anti-government demonstrations on Nov. 11.

Shades of Saddam

With killings, beatings, and disappearances, the Iraqi government is growing more authoritarian in response to the protests.

A man waves an Indian flag near Chungking Mansions, a popular haunt among minority South Asians and Africans in Hong Kong, as police keep watch at a crosswalk during a pro-democracy rally in Tsim Sha Tsui district on Oct. 27.

Hong Kong’s Minorities Face Racism From Police and Protesters

Ethnic tensions are coming to the fore, but many minorities find solidarity with activists.

Left: Muhammad Naseer Sheikh covers the hole where an unexploded live shell is buried in Chakra, Indian-administered Kashmir, on Nov. 1. Right: The mortar fired from across the Line of Control hit the tin roof of Sheikh’s residence before getting buried in the ground near his house.

In the Line of Fire Along Kashmir’s Line of Control

Since India revoked Kashmiri autonomy in August, local villagers have been living in fear amid cross-border gunfire and unexploded shells.

Women chant slogans during the commemoration of the International Women's Day in Medellín, Colombia

Colombian Women Are Saying ‘Yes, We Can’

Colombia’s culture of machismo has created a backlash in the form of a new women’s political movement.

An election banner with a portrait of Arab Israeli candidate Waleed Taha

Amid Political Chaos, a Chance for Israel’s Arab Minority

Seeking to form a government, Benny Gantz is meeting with the Arab Joint List. What does that mean for the political future of its constituency?

Iraqi protesters hold a candlelight vigil for those killed during anti-government demonstrations in Karbala, south of Baghdad, on Nov. 1.

Enraged Iraqi Protesters Blame Iran for Killings

Many demonstrators see Tehran’s hand in widespread violence and support for the embattled prime minister.

Members of the Azov movement protest in front of Ukraine’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Kyiv on Oct. 28 holding a banner that says "Defense of Ukraine Is Not Terrorism!"

U.S. Congress Accidentally Boosted Ukraine’s Far-Right

A member of Congress wrote to the State Department calling out Ukraine’s Azov movement as terrorists. It backfired.

South Korean soldiers participate in the 71st annual Armed Forces Day at an air base in Daegu on Oct. 1.

Tired of U.S. Dependence, South Korea Seeks to Build—and Sell—Its Own Weapons

The military is turning its focus to domestic research and development and seeking to become a major arms supplier, and that is scaring North Korea.

A Russian military police armored personnel carrier drives past an equestrian statue of Bassel al-Assad, the late brother of President Bashar al-Assad, in the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli on Oct. 24.

Russia Is the Only Winner in Syria

With Washington’s policy in chaos and Erdogan moving into Putin’s orbit, Moscow has come out on top.

Lebanese security forces stand between supporters of the Shiite Hezbollah movement (foreground) and anti-government protesters (background) at Riad al-Solh Square in Beirut on Oct. 25.

Lebanon’s Protests Are Leaderless. That May Be Their Strength.

Fed up with decades of economic mismanagement and corruption, most demonstrators just want the government gone.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pictured.

Parliament Is Skeptical About Boris’s Brexit Deal

Still, if the new agreement fails to gain approval, the public may not blame Johnson at the polls.

Scottish National Party Member of Parliament Ian Blackford joins celebrations marking five years since Scotland's independence referendum.

Scotland Could Leave the United Kingdom Over Brexit—and Green Energy

The debate over how to best marshal the country's alternative energy sources may affect a new independence referendum.

A woman walks past campaign posters for candidates of the Law and Justice party in Warsaw, Poland, on Oct. 9.

A Tale of Two Polands

The Law and Justice party is tapping into divides that have split the country for centuries—and will probably win this weekend’s elections because of it.

Protesters hold a giant Polish national flag during a demonstration against a judicial reform pushed through by the right-wing government but criticised by the EU as a threat to judicial independence on July 24, 2018 in Warsaw.

Poland Is Purging Its Prosecutors

The PiS government is rooting out, relocating, and demoting political critics in the name of judicial reform.

Protesters hold signs against the ongoing restrictions of the internet and mobile phone networks at the Kashmir Press Club in Srinagar on Oct. 3.

For Kashmiri Graduates, India’s Clampdown Is ‘Like Death’

With the repeal of Article 370, India has opened the way for fierce competition over scarce government jobs.

Riot police protect a pride parade amid risks of disruption by far-right opponents in Plock, central Poland, on Aug. 10.

In Poland’s Upcoming Election, the Law and Justice Party Is Demonizing the LGBT Community to Win

The party is likely to win the vote, but it may eventually lose the broader cultural fight.

Iraqi protesters speak to police

Angry Iraqis Demand New Government

After 15 years of corruption, Iraqi protesters have finally reached a breaking point. Some even want military rule.

Workers at the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing

Does the World’s Longest Undersea Tunnel Have a China Problem?

A Chinese-financed project to connect the Estonian and Finnish capitals has hit a snag as Europe ponders how to deal with Beijing’s economic heft.

Seyil Eldos with his three younger brothers on the outskirts of Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, on May 17. Eldos’s biological father died of a heart attack, and his mother married her husband’s younger brother, as is traditional. Eldos’s three brothers were born to the second marriage.

A Family Stranded by China’s Camps

Repression in Xinjiang leaves tens of thousands of children without parents.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 summit in Japan.

Xi Jinping Has Embraced Vladimir Putin—for Now

But the Russia-China flirtation may not last forever. As in the classic novel “Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” the Chinese can be calculating about alliances.

Ten-year-old Bilal Habibulla poses with his drawing of the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, Xinjiang, at his home in Istanbul on April 27. The Id Kah Mosque is a symbol for the Uighur culture.

The Capital of Xinjiang Is Now in Turkey

Ethnic cleansing of Uighurs in China has forced an exodus to Istanbul—and a desperate effort to keep their culture alive.

People stand in line to check their names on the final list of India's National Register of Citizens in a village some 40 miles from Guwahati, the largest city of the northeastern state of Assam, on Aug. 31.

All Are Stateless. Some Are Hopeless.

Hindus left stateless in Assam think Modi will save them. Muslims fear the worst.

A Kashmiri muslim throws back a can of tear gas shot by Indian police on Feb. 05, 2010 in Srinagar, Kashmir, India.

Inside Kashmir’s New Anti-Indian Resistance

Cut off from the outside world, Kashmiris are digging trenches, starting strikes, and preparing for a long fight ahead.

A man suspected of belonging to the Islamic State group, who spoke to journalists in French, leans on the back of a truck as he waits to be searched by members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces just after leaving the Islamic State's last holdout of Baghouz, in the eastern Syrian province of Deir Ezzor on March 4.

They Left to Join ISIS. Now Europe Is Leaving Their Citizens to Die in Iraq.

A Belgian fighter captured in Syria was transported to Iraq to face trial. He's now on death row.

A Greenland ice melt lake atop the sheet, seen from 5,000 feet above, in August. Across Greenland’s massive ice sheet, blue pools of melted water, forming icy lakes, dot the landscape as far as the eye can see.

Greenland Is the Center of the World

The Arctic island offers a harrowing reminder of the environmental damage, and political dangers, already imposed by climate change.

Activists with green handkerchiefs, which symbolizes the abortion rights movement, demonstrate to mark the revival of their campaign to legalize abortion, in front of the National Congress in Buenos Aires, on May 28.

Young Voters Care About Abortion Policy. Argentine Politicians Are Ignoring Them.

The youth vote is becoming increasingly important in Argentina, but the leading presidential candidates are deliberately avoiding the issue that matters most to them.

Demonstrators demand the resignation of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Aug. 7

Honduran Protesters Have Little Cause for Hope

Even if President Juan Orlando Hernández were to leave office, the country’s problems would persist.

Indian security personnel walk on a street in Srinagar on August 9, 2019,

Kashmir’s Paramilitary Lockdown Traps Locals

Witnesses say travel is nearly impossible and communications have been severed.

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper is presented a horse by Mongolia's defense minister, Nyamaagiin Enkhbold, in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, on Aug. 8.

In Rare Mongolia Stop, U.S. Defense Secretary Gets an Unusual Gift

Esper’s visit is designed to send a pointed signal to Mongolia’s neighbors: Russia and China.

From left, Ethiopian mediator Mahmoud Drir, protest leader Ahmed al-Rabie, and Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, Sudan's deputy head of the Transitional Military Council, celebrate after signing the constitutional declaration in Khartoum on Aug. 4.

How Sudan’s Military Overcame the Revolution

Sudan’s protesters wanted to overthrow their president and his regime. They were only half-successful.

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky looks on during a press conference after a meeting with president of the European Council at the European Council in Brussels on June 5.

Welcome to Ukraine’s Post-Post-Maidan Era

Ukraine’s president now has an unprecedented level of parliamentary support. What will he do with it?

Ukraine's then-president, Petro Poroshenko, listens to then-presidential candidate and comedian Volodymyr Zelensky during an election debate in Kiev on April 19.

Once Again, Ukraine Steps Into the Unknown

A comedian-turned-president, a rockstar-turned-party leader, and a sea of new faces in the parliament: Meet the new political reality in Ukraine.

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