East Asia

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, U.S. President Donald Trump, and others before a meeting on U.N. reform at the U.N. headquarters in New York City on Sept. 18, 2017. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Empty North Korea Threats Will Lead to Humiliation or War

Either Trump will back down and once again eat his words, or he will strike North Korea, with consequences almost too great to contemplate.

North (top) and South (bottom) Korean border posts on Aug. 21, 2015. (Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images)

Seven Reasons Why Putting U.S. Nukes Back in South Korea Is a Terrible Idea

Here are seven reasons why the United States should not seek to deploy nuclear weapons in the Korean Peninsula.

This picture taken on September 25, 2017 shows South Korean cadets standing in front of a Hyunmoo-3 cruise missile system during a media day presentation of a commemoration event marking South Korea's Armed Forces Day, which will fall on October 1, at the Second Fleet Command of Navy in Pyeongtaek.  / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time to Reckon With What It Would Really Take to Deter North Korea

A policy of unification would perhaps forestall the irreversible nuclearization of Asia.

South Korean soldiers stand guard at a guard post near the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) dividing two Koreas in the border city of Paju on August 11, 2017.
As nuclear-armed North Korea's missile stand-off with the US escalates, calls are mounting in the South for Seoul to build nuclear weapons of its own to defend itself -- which would complicate the situation even further. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Should Talk to North Korea

Trump needs to focus on reassuring U.S. allies, engage with North Korea, and stop doing Pyongyang favors.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during the Dialogue of Emerging Market and Developing Countries on the sidelines of the 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, southeastern China's Fujian Province on September 5, 2017.
Xi opened the annual summit of BRICS leaders that already has been upstaged by North Korea's latest nuclear weapons provocation. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / WU HONG        (Photo credit should read WU HONG/AFP/Getty Images)

A Nuclear Slap in China’s Face

Kim Jong Un has caused Xi Jinping to lose face. What will China do about it?

This picture from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) taken on July 3, 2017 and released on July 4, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un signing the order to carry out the test-fire of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 at an undisclosed location.
North Korea declared on July 4 it had successfully tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile -- a watershed moment in its push to develop a nuclear weapon capable of hitting the mainland United States. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIA KNS / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT   ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP. 
 /         (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Nuclear Crisis Was of His Own Making

The showdown between Washington and Pyongyang was the president's invention.

WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 17:  Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (2ndR), Defense Secretary James Mattis (R), shake hands with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono (2ndL) and Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera (L), during a meeting of the U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee at the State Department, on August 17, 2017 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Tokyo and Washington Have Another Nuclear Problem

There’s a plutonium arms race brewing in East Asia that could see China, Japan, and South Korea with the capability to make tens of thousands of nuclear weapons.

China's President Xi Jinping (L) and US President Donald Trump attend a working session on the first day of the G20 summit in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7, 2017. 
Leaders of the world's top economies gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / Patrik STOLLARZ        (Photo credit should read PATRIK STOLLARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s China Policy Must Look Beyond North Korea

The White House should consider the long term in its dealings with Beijing.

A uniformed tour guide gestures to tourists outside the War Museum in Pyongyang on October 9, 2015. North Korea is gearing up for a lavish celebration marking the 70th anniversary of its ruling Workers' Party on October 10.     AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones        (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

Spring Break in Pyongyang Is Cancelled

In the wake of an American student’s death, the U.S. decides to cut off travel to North Korea.

Load 10 More Articles

You have read 0 of 5 free articles

Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover