Economics

talian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini attends a press conference at the Italian Embassy in Bucharest, Romania, on Oct. 23. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Should Let Italy Win

It’s time for Brussels to grab the wheel in the game of chicken over Rome’s budget.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday announced limited waivers for Iranian oil sales, but stressed U.S. intentions of applying “maximum pressure,” Washington, May 21, 2018. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

U.S. to Allow Some Iranian Oil Sales—For Now

With sanctions kicking in Monday, the administration still aims for zero oil exports from Iran but wants to avoid spiking price of crude.

Brazilian far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro talks to the press in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 25. (Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

Investors Love Bolsonaro. Can He Deliver?

Markets are soaring ahead of Brazil’s runoff election—on what may turn out to be mere wishful thinking.

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, right, speaks at a press conference following a cabinet meeting on the country's draft budget on Oct. 15. (Photo by Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images)

‘This Is an Existential Test of the Eurozone’

Economic historian Adam Tooze assesses the Italian crisis—and the prospects for a global collapse.

Iran is trying to maintain oil exports in the face of U.S. sanctions. An oil tanker off the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas on July 2, 2012. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the U.S. Make Oil Sanctions on Iran Work?

Given pushback from friends and foes, Trump’s goal of zero Iranian exports is still far off.

Cracked mud is pictured at sunrise on the dried shores of Lake Gruyère, affected by continuous drought, near the western Swiss village of Avry-devant-Pont. (Fabrice Cofrin/AFP/Getty Images)

The Hope at the Heart of the Apocalyptic Climate Change Report

Along with their latest dire predictions, the world’s leading climate scientists offered a new path forward—but will anyone take it?

Ships in the Port Louis harbor in Mauritius on Dec. 25, 2015. (T. Vale/Getty Images)

African Governments Are Paying for the World Bank’s Mauritius Miracle

Ghost offices on the small island provide legal but questionable means of siphoning tax dollars away from poor countries and into the pockets of the global elite.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron wave to the crowds during a welcoming ceremony at the chancellery in Berlin on May 15, 2017. (Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images)

Britain Isn’t Just Losing Brexit. Europe Is Winning It.

Businesses are leaving the United Kingdom because of its economic uncertainty—and because Dublin, Paris, and Frankfurt are more attractive anyway.

British Prime Minister Theresa May and Arlene Foster, the leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) visit Belleek Pottery, on July 19, 2018 in St Belleek, Northern Ireland. (Clodagh Kilcoyne - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

The Democratic Unionist Party Isn’t Bluffing on Brexit. It’s Being ‘Thran.’

The small Northern Irish party that props up the British government has a history of belligerence and brinkmanship. But ultimately it will blink.

A picture shows a mural depicting the emblem of the Islamic State in Hawija, Iraq, on Oct. 5, 2017. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS’s New Plans to Get Rich and Wreak Havoc

The terrorist organization has lost almost all its territory but has found new ways to make vast sums of money.

An Iranian tanker and a South Korean tanker docking at the platform of the oil facility in the Khark Island, on the shore of the Persian Gulf on March 12, 2017.

The Road to Tehran Runs Through Oslo

Norway—and Oman—can help end the impasse over Iran sanctions by creating an externally-managed and guaranteed oil fund.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence laid out the Trump administration’s tougher policy toward China in Washington on Oct. 4. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s No Longer Just a Trade War Between the U.S. and China

Vice President Pence’s fierce attack and allegations of tech spying escalate the conflict.

Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) march during a military parade in Tehran on Sept. 22.(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Tougher U.S. Sanctions Will Enrich Iran’s Revolutionary Guards

As the economic noose tightens on the Iranian economy, smugglers will thrive and the IRGC will be the first to profit.

A panda sleeping at the Shenyang Forest Wild Zoological Garden in northeastern China on Dec. 30, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

Is the Trade War About to Become a Currency War?

Some experts figure Beijing might risk further driving down the renminbi against the dollar.

Demonstrators march in Sydney during a protest to demand humane treatment of asylum-seekers and refugees on July 21. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s First Immigration Economy

Australia’s economy is addicted to immigration, requiring ever-increasing infusions of new people to stave off an inevitable collapse.

Conservative members of Parliament Jacob Rees-Mogg, Boris Johnson, and Peter Bone listen during the launch of "A World Trade Deal: The Complete Guide" at the Houses of Parliament on September 11, 2018 in London, England.

A No-Deal Brexit Will Destroy the British Economy

The magical wing of the Conservative Party believes that Britain can crash out of the European Union painlessly. It is leading the country into a recession.

U.S. President Donald Trump talks up the revised NAFTA deal from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on Oct. 1. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Trump Mainly Rebranding NAFTA?

The economic impact—and political future—of the '94 trade deal's successor is utterly unclear.

Steam and exhaust rise from different companies on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Oberhausen, Germany.

The Paris Accord Won’t Stop Global Warming on Its Own

The world needs a new alliance of green economic powers to create a low-carbon economic zone.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waits in front of the presidential residence in New Delhi on April 7. (Money Sharma/AFP/Getty)

Narendra Modi Is No Populist

His economic reforms have already put the Indian economy on stronger footing, and his welfare schemes have given him the buy-in he needs.

French President Emmanuel Macron runs to greet people, after the annual Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris on July 14, 2018. (PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)

Slow Down, Emmanuel Macron!

The French president is looking toward the future—but his country feels left behind.

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