Economics

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attend a panel discussion titled 'Launch Event Women's Entrepreneur Finance Initiative' on the second day of the G20 summit on July 8, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany. (Ukas Michael - Pool/Getty Images)

The West Will Die So That Trump Can Win

America created the postwar order by delaying immediate economic gratification. Those days are over.

Donald Trump walks to the official G7 welcoming ceremony in La Malbaie, Quebec, Canada, June 8, 2018. (GEOFF ROBINS / AFP)

Trump’s Creative Destruction of the International Order

The global system was long overdue for a shake-up. Trump has been happy to oblige.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, flanked by his deputy Ali Babacan and Central Bank Governor Erdem Basci with the symbol for the national currency, the Turkish lira, during a ceremony in Ankara, on March 1, 2012. (ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan Is Failing Economics 101

Turkey’s president has made a huge bet that he's right and all of the world’s economic experts are wrong.

Central American migrants enter the El Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, on April 29. (Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images)

Jobs and Opportunity Are the Only Path to Peace in Central America

The United States must foster free trade and economic growth in Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, or the vicious cycle of violence will persist.

A Ford factory in Kentucky on Oct. 27, 2017. Ford invested in factory upgrades to make all-new, heavier vehicles for a booming U.S. market. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

Trump Dials Up the Trade War to 11

Citing national security concerns, the Trump administration could slap tariffs on autos from friends and allies. They’re not thrilled.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the West Lake State Guest House on Sept. 4, 2016 in Hangzhou, China. (Wang Zhou - Pool/Getty Images)

China Has Decided Russia Is Too Risky an Investment

The economics of a major oil deal seemed to make sense. But when energy companies are arms of the state, economics aren't the only factor.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

Students protest at the University of Tehran during a demonstration driven by anger over economic problems on Dec. 30, 2017. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Should Seize on Iran’s Currency Crisis

An anti-regime alliance of rich and poor could be the key to ending clerical rule.

Why Democracy Doesn’t Deliver

Endless elections, unqualified leaders, uninformed voters, and short-term thinking are impeding economic growth.

A voter casts her ballot in the referendum to end the guerrilla war between the FARC and the Colombian government in Bogotá on Oct. 2, 2016. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Here’s How the United States Can Help Colombia Thrive

As an era of peace approaches, both countries should take practical steps to strengthen the relationship.

Employees build a Boeing 777 airplane cockpit at a plant in Wichita, Kansas, on Aug. 18, 2004. (Larry W. Smith/Getty Images)

Why China Will Win the Trade War

Trump thinks he has a strong hand. In fact, Washington is far more vulnerable than Beijing.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Da Nang, Vietnam, on Nov. 11, 2017. (Jorge Silva/Getty Images)

Trump Still Doesn’t Take Russia Seriously

Rather than speaking out against Putin, the U.S. president is playing into Moscow’s hands.

An activist of the new centrist-liberal Momentum party over-pastes an anti-migration billboard on March 28 in Budapest, Hungary. (Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images)

Hungary’s Strongman Has a Weak Spot

Viktor Orban may have won, but a narrow loss in the countryside suggests that corruption could one day be his undoing.

People gather in Istanbul to support the Turkish government following a failed coup attempt on July 16, 2016. (Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Alliance With Turkey Is Worth Preserving

Ankara is a difficult friend. That doesn't mean the United States should cut it loose.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on March 7, 2018 in London, England. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Isn’t Wonky Enough

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince knows his country needs an economic overhaul, but his plans don’t add up.

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