Economics

European Commission chief negotiator Michel Barnier slams Britain for “backtracking” on its commitments after another fruitless round of talks, at a press conference in Brussels on June 5.

No-Deal Brexit Looks Likelier Than Ever After the Pandemic

The U.K. and EU still find themselves far apart on crucial issues—with time running out.

U.S. President Donald Trump, alongside Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

China Puts the Final Kibosh on Trump’s Trade Deal

By reportedly halting major agricultural purchases, Beijing makes it likely U.S.-China relations will dramatically worsen.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (center) with his wife, Emine Erdogan, followed by then-International Monetary Fund Director Christine Lagarde (left) in Paris on Nov. 11, 2018, prior to commemorations marking the 100th anniversary of the  armistice ending World War I.

Why Erdogan Won’t Ask the IMF for Help

Turkey’s economy is a mess, but its president won’t seek an IMF loan because the conditions would mean giving up his extensive patronage network.

Windows of the Grand Hotel in Taipei are illuminated to form the word "zero" after Taiwan reported no new COVID-19 cases for two consecutive days, on April 17.

How Taiwan Can Turn Coronavirus Victory Into Economic Success

Taiwan beat the virus with efficient government and advanced technology—the same ingredients that power the economy.

The New York Stock Exchange.

Our Top Weekend Reads

The stock market is soaring, African leaders are rallying around George Floyd, and reducing the U.S. military presence abroad could boost the domestic economy.

A portrait of Charles-Alexandre de Calonne (1734-1802), French politician and economist.

Forget Hamilton. This Is Europe’s Calonne Moment.

The EU is still muddling through its post-pandemic recovery—and 18th-century history suggests that disaster could await.

Police detain people during protests in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Ensnared in U.S.-China Showdown

The U.S. pronouncement that it no longer considers Hong Kong to be independent from China paves the way for future sanctions, which could hurt the very people the United States means to help.

South Korean warplanes at at U.S. Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek

Want to Fix the Deficit? Bring Home the Troops.

As U.S. federal spending surges amid the coronavirus pandemic, it’s time to trim the real fat.

A cotton grower looks on as she works in a cotton plantation.

It’s Not Time to End the Uzbek Cotton Boycott Yet

Companies should not buy Uzbekistan’s cotton until labor protections and responsible sourcing are guaranteed.

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley, who is leading the charge to pull the United States out of the World Trade Organization, speaks to the press at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 30.

U.S. Effort to Depart WTO Gathers Momentum

Both political parties are demonizing the world trade body, but many experts warn that such a move could seriously set back U.S. power and prestige.

France Hotel Homeless Coronavirus

Are Hotels the Solution to Homelessness?

A commonsense solution to the housing crisis has gained backers amid the pandemic—but can the political will remain?

Economic stimulus checks are prepared for printing.

Why the White House Should Propose More Economic Stimulus

While a wait-and-see approach is usually wise, unusual times require unusual playbooks, writes a former Trump administration economic advisor.

coronavirus-void-governments-FP-guide-foreign-policy-jon-benedict-illo

Goodbye, Government. Hello, Mafia.

From insurgent groups to charities, a range of nongovernmental organizations are stepping in to respond to the coronavirus crisis.

A worker from the Iztapalapa government waits to apply antibacterial gel at the San Nicolas Tolentino Civil Pantheon in Mexico City, on May 12.

Coronavirus Brings Mexico’s Governors to the Fore

State leaders are showing up the president in their pandemic response, giving López Obrador’s critics their loudest opportunity yet to oppose his policies.

An excavator loads a truck with oil sands.

Albertan Officials Are Using Orwellian Methods to Protect Oil and Gas

As its energy industry comes under threat, the oil-rich province is taking aim at environmental activists.

Santiago Demonstrators Clash With Police Over Food Supply

Food Price Spikes and Social Unrest: The Dark Side of the Fed’s Crisis-Fighting

Emergency monetary policies produce an unintended consequence: rising food prices around the world.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left) greets Benny Gantz, the leader of Blue and White party, at a memorial ceremony for the late Israeli President Shimon Peres in Jerusalem on Sept. 19, 2019.

Israel’s Cease-Fire Government Should Promote Healing, Not Division

Netanyahu and Gantz could use their unity government to speed Israel’s economic recovery rather than entrenching political deadlock.

Environmental activists rally for accountability for fossil fuel companies outside of New York Supreme Court on Oct. 22, 2019 in New York City.

Oil Price Crash Revives Fossil Fuel Divestment Campaigns

Climate activists say this is the moment for colleges and major institutions to dump their investments.

us-china-trade-decoupling-trump-xi

The Great Decoupling

Washington is pressing for a post-pandemic decoupling from China. But the last big economic split brought on two world wars and a depression. What’s in store this time?

Christine Lagarde, then-director of the International Monetary Fund, speaks with Jerome Powell, the chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve, during the family picture of the G-20 meeting of finance ministers and central bank governors in Buenos Aires on July 21, 2018.

The Death of the Central Bank Myth

For decades, monetary policy has been treated as technical, not political. The pandemic has ended that illusion forever.