El Salvador

Children attend the funeral of Rubelsy Tomas Isidro, a Guatemalan migrant murdered alongside 18 other people in the northern Mexican state of Tamaulipas last month, in Comitancillo, Guatemala, on March 13.

Biden Rethinks Central America Strategy

Corrupt local elites thwarted some engagement efforts of the past decade, Biden’s new special envoy wrote.

A Salvadoran police officer guards a crime scene where a member of the National Civil Police was allegedly killed by gang members, in Santa Tecla, El Salvador, on Oct. 17, 2017.

El Salvador’s Homicide Rate Hit a Historic Low in 2020

But the reasons behind the drop are unclear, and broader security and economic reforms are urgently needed.

Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele poses for a selfie with a supporter after voting during parliamentary and local elections in San Salvador,  Salvador, on Feb. 28.

In El Salvador, Broken Promises Have Forced the Establishment Out

In Sunday’s legislative elections, voters overwhelmingly backed a popular president promising change, despite criticisms of democratic backsliding.

A street vendor wears as mask a message of support for Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele in San Salvador on May 1, 2020.

New Ideas and Old Risks in El Salvador

President Nayib Bukele’s Nuevas Ideas party prepares for an electoral sweep.

Virginia Flores shows a picture of Camila Díaz Córdova as she waits outside the Attorney General's office in San Salvador, El Salvador, on Feb. 23, 2019.

El Salvador’s Justice System Takes on a Historic Case

Transgender rights activists say the prosecution of Camila Díaz Córdova’s death as a hate crime is an advance, although LGBTQ citizens continue to face discrimination and abuse.

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The Words That Explained the World in 2019

A look at terms from India and El Salvador to South Korea and Ukraine.

A man faces a member of the Canadian police as he carries baggage as he crosses the U.S.-Canada border on Feb. 26, 2017, in  Champlain, New York.

Is Canada Violating Its Constitution by Sending Refugees Back to the United States?

A federal court case could stop Ottawa from treating the United States as a safe third country due to the Trump administration’s harsh policies toward asylum-seekers.

An inmate in solitary confinement looks out of his cell at the Penal San Francisco Gótera, one of the only mixed-gang prisons in El Salvador, on Nov. 8, 2018. The facility houses members of MS-13, La 18, Mao Mao, and Mirada Loca.

A Nation Held Hostage

The rival gangs MS-13 and La 18 control or influence every facet of life in El Salvador, making the small Central American nation the world’s most dangerous place outside a war zone.

Nzeyimana Consolate arrives carrying her baby at the Nyabitara transit site, among other Burundian refugees, on Oct. 3, 2019 in Ruyigi, Burundi. Nearly 600 Burundians who fled political violence in their home country to Tanzania were repatriated voluntarily, the U.N. refugee agency  said.

Sending Refugees Back Makes the World More Dangerous

Repatriating refugees to dangerous countries violates international law and breeds conflict, instability, and future crises. Regional work visas and long-term integration into host countries are more promising solutions.

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Diplomats’ Warnings Over Mass Deportations Ignored by Trump Administration

A memo details the Trump administration’s efforts to end waivers for hundreds of thousands of vulnerable Central American nationals and send them home.

Calo Rosa for Foreign Policy

El Salvador’s Tough Policing Isn’t What It Looks Like

Shootings reported as enfrentamientos, or confrontations, often mask killings of civilians and other misconduct.

Nayib Bukele speaks during the closing rally of his campaign in San Salvador on Jan. 26.

El Salvador’s Trump Takes Office

Can Nayib Bukele cozy up to the United States?

Protestors confront police at a rally marking International Women's Day in Istanbul on March 8. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, the world marked International Women’s Day, and the U.S. State Department canceled an award for a Finnish journalist who criticized Trump.

Soldiers monitor a protest in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Dec. 15, 2017. (Delmer Membreno/Picture-Alliance/DPA/AP)

Trump Is Sending Guns South as Migrants Flee North

The administration’s push to weaken oversight of gun exports could worsen the Central American refugee crisis.

Women march during International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in San Salvador, El Salvador, on Nov. 26, 2018. (Marvin Recinos/AFP/Getty Images)

El Salvador Kills Women as the U.S. Shrugs

Washington helped start an epidemic of violence against women in Central America. Now it’s washing its hands of the problem.

Nayib Bukele (second from right), his wife, Gabriela Rodríguez (right), and Vice President-elect Félix Ulloa (second from left) celebrate after Bukele won the Salvadoran presidential election in San Salvador on Feb. 3. (Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

Can El Salvador’s New President Fix What’s Driving Citizens Out?

Nayib Bukele won in a landslide. Now, he needs new policies to reduce violence in his country.

Demonstrators gathered in front of the White House to protest U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to terminate temporary protected status for citizens of Sudan, El Salvador, Haiti, and Nicaragua in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 9. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

How One Top Diplomat Took a Stand Against Trump’s Immigration Policy

The under secretary of state feared that canceling the temporary protected status for some immigrants would be a blight on U.S. foreign policy.

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