Energy

Israel's Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz (L) speaks as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) and Noble Energy's Vice President for Major Projects George Hatfield (R) stand by during the inauguration of the newly-arrived foundation platform for the Leviathan natural gas field in the Mediterranean Sea, about 80 miles west of the Israeli city of Haifa, on January 31.

Will an Israeli Energy Boom Make the EU Pro-Israel?

Future dependency on Israeli natural gas could change the political equation for many European countries that are currently critical of Israeli policies toward Palestinians.

Turkey’s Yavuz drillship, seen from shore of the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, is one of several operating in Cypriot waters, sparking a rebuke from the European Union.

Turkey’s Big Energy Grab

Ankara is eyeing the gas reserves around Cyprus, causing yet more international tensions.

A U.S. Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk drone, an example of which is seen here on June 11, 2012, was shot down by Iranian IRGC surface-to-air missiles near the Strait of Hormuz.

Did Iran Just Invite a U.S. Attack?

“This country will not stand for it,” Trump says after drone shootdown.

The drill ship Ensco DS-7 in Limassol, Cyprus, on Feb. 28.

Gas for Peace

A virtual gas hub could create real cooperation in the Eastern Mediterranean.

The Saudi tanker Amjad was one of two damaged by sabotage attacks near the Emirati port of Fujairah, part of an apparent pattern of Iranian retaliation for U.S. pressure, on May 13.

Using Proxies, Iran Appears to Be Hitting Back in the Fight Over Oil

Experts believe Tehran is behind recent attacks on Saudi oil installations and vessels.

Iranian forces take part in National Persian Gulf Day in the Strait of Hormuz on April 30. Iran has repeatedly threatened to close the crucial waterway as a riposte to U.S. pressure.

How Dangerous Are U.S.-Iran Tensions?

Washington cites Tehran’s “warnings” in deploying a carrier strike group to the Persian Gulf. The question is whether the threat is real.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets with leaders from Israel, Greece, and Cyprus to discuss plans for a gas pipeline from the Mediterranean to Europe in Jerusalem on March 20. (Jim Young/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Lawmakers Talk Turkey to Ankara

New legislation is aimed at forcing the recalcitrant NATO ally back into the fold.

Pakistani residents catch fish in the Ravi River near Lahore on Oct. 13, 2014. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

Are India and Pakistan on the Verge of a Water War?

In reprisal for a deadly terrorist attack in Kashmir, the Indian government says it will divert river waters that downstream Pakistan has been counting on.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman laughs with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires on Nov. 30, 2018. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

Who’s Afraid of Saudi Nukes?

Riyadh’s reckless behavior foments widespread mistrust of its plans to buy nuclear reactors.

President Hassan Rouhani speaks to the Iranian parliament in Tehran on Dec. 25, 2018. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Economy Is Crumbling, but Collapse Is a Long Way Off

Things will only get worse under Trump’s sanctions, but China, India, and other countries are still defiantly buying oil.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron were all smiles just weeks ago on Jan. 22, but that could change after Paris bucked Berlin’s hopes of building a Russian pipeline. (Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images)

France and Germany Face Off Over Russian Pipeline

Though Berlin badly wants it built, Paris is set to side with the EU on new rules intended to contain Moscow.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin hold a press briefing at the White House on Jan. 28. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

How Trump’s Venezuela Sanctions Could Undercut His Iran Policy

The U.S. president takes direct aim at Maduro’s power, but the economic pain could spread.

The Tamar natural gas production platform on March 28, 2013. There is growing regional cooperation on energy in the Eastern Mediterranean, whose natural gas boom kicked off here, off the coast of Israel. (Albatross/Getty Images)

Club Med: Israel, Egypt, and Others Form New Natural Gas Group

The new grouping is meant to jump-start the Eastern Mediterranean’s energy revolution.

This week’s OPEC+ meeting could see another friendly handshake between Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured here on Dec. 1. (Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images)

Are Putin and Mohammed bin Salman Getting Ready for Another High-Five?

This week’s OPEC meeting could cement closer cooperation between Russia and Saudi Arabia.

Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a press conference in Mexico City on Oct. 29. (Ulises Ruiz /AFP/Getty Images)

How Will AMLO Govern Mexico?

Mexico’s new president promises to fight corruption and inequality, but critics worry he’ll be the country’s Hugo Chávez.

The shale oil revolution has brought boom, and sometimes bust, to places like Midland, Texas, shown here on Feb. 5, 2015. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Why American Oil Hasn’t Been a Total Game-Changer

The U.S. is now the world’s top producer, but Saudi Arabia still holds the key to crude prices.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday announced limited waivers for Iranian oil sales, but stressed U.S. intentions of applying “maximum pressure,” Washington, May 21, 2018. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

U.S. to Allow Some Iranian Oil Sales—For Now

With sanctions kicking in Monday, the administration still aims for zero oil exports from Iran but wants to avoid spiking price of crude.

Iran is trying to maintain oil exports in the face of U.S. sanctions. An oil tanker off the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas on July 2, 2012. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the U.S. Make Oil Sanctions on Iran Work?

Given pushback from friends and foes, Trump’s goal of zero Iranian exports is still far off.

The construction site of a nuclear reactor in Sanmen, Zhejiang province, China, on June 4, 2009. Almost 10 years ago, China began building new nuclear reactors with U.S. technology, and the first finally came online this week. (Feng Li/Getty Images)

Trump’s Latest China Salvo Could Hurt U.S. Nuke Industry

Administration says Beijing is diverting U.S. nuclear technology for military use.

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