Energy

Pump jacks draw crude oil in California

Is the U.S. Also to Blame in the Oil Price War?

Congress is accusing Saudi Arabia and Russia of waging “economic warfare” on the United States. But companies in the United States, the biggest oil producer in the world, aren’t slowing down yet.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin

No End in Sight to the Oil Price War Between Russia and Saudi Arabia

Riyadh and Moscow are both betting they can win a global game of chicken over production.

Traders like Peter Tuchman were hit with a global markets rout on Monday, fueled by crashing oil prices and mounting worries over the impact of the coronavirus, Mar. 9, 2020.

An Economic Pandemic

With markets plunging worldwide, Trump does an about-face and promises "major" efforts to contain the coronavirus and ease economic pain.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Igor Sechin of Rosneft

Russia’s Defiance Sets the Stage for Oil Price ‘Bloodbath’

Moscow rejects OPEC’s effort to avert a coronavirus-driven price collapse, shutting down an agreement to cut crude output.

Hammered by the coronavirus, OPEC opted to cut oil production and shore up prices, figuring that the threat from America’s decade-old oil boom is winding down, Oct. 21, 2019.

OPEC Tries to Forestall a Coronavirus Oil Collapse

Questions remain whether other oil exporters will join the pact to slash output—and if that will be enough to push up crude prices.

Leading Democrats including Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden, seen here at a debate on Feb. 25, are all proposing energy policies that could curtail the American energy boom.

Democrats Threaten Energy Rollback

Markets might get jittery as bids by Biden, Sanders, and Warren to restrict fossil fuels move a bit closer to reality.

A view of Dongsi Shitiao crossroad in Beijing on Feb. 10. Many Chinese cities are nearly empty of cars and traffic in the wake of the virus outbreak.

Coronavirus Threatens to Blow Up Trump’s Energy Trade Deal With China

The goals were never realistic, but now Beijing has good reason to back away from its purchase commitments to Washington.

A general view of the Blue Nile as it passes through the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, which has been a flash point for tensions between Egypt and Ethiopia, on Dec. 26, 2019.

Egypt and Ethiopia Said to Be Close to Accord on Renaissance Dam

But talks in Washington haven’t yet solved the trickiest questions still looming over the dam’s impact on countries downstream.

A view of the platform of the Leviathan natural gas field in the Mediterranean Sea from the Israeli northern coastal city of Caesarea on Dec. 19, 2019.

The World’s Next Energy Bonanza

Even more than fracking, tapping oceanic methane hydrates could soon upend the global energy landscape.

Iranian mourners carry a picture of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei decorating now-slain Gen. Qassem Suleimani during his funeral procession in Tehran on Jan. 6.

Get Ready for More Mischief From Iran

An energy expert warns that Tehran will find new ways and locations to strike asymmetrically, maybe even in the Red Sea and the Bab el-Mandeb strait.

Iranians burn a U.S. flag during a demonstration in Tehran following the killing of Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Maj. Gen. Qassem Suleimani

Suleimani Killing Sparks Fear of War and Economic Turmoil

Oil markets expect escalation in wake of U.S. strike on Iranian general.

Libyan Foreign Minister Mohamed Taher Siala, left, and his Turkish counterpart, Mevlut Cavusoglu

Newly Aggressive Turkey Forges Alliance With Libya

Erdogan’s latest bid to reshape the Mediterranean provides military support to Tripoli against Russian-backed rebels.

View of Tehran shops that were destroyed after nationwide demonstrations broke out in protest of fuel price hikes and led to widespread destruction of property, on Nov. 20.

Iran Protests Suggest Trump Sanctions Are Inflicting Serious Pain

The regime has survived uprisings in the past. But now it is starting to kill demonstrators in great numbers.

Activists march through Los Angeles during a climate change rally on Nov. 1.

Is the United States Really Leaving the Paris Climate Agreement?

Yes, but the process takes a long time. Final withdrawal will occur one day after the 2020 election—but Washington may still be able to get back in.

U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a "Trump Digs Coal" sign at a rally in West Virginia, one of the states hit by the coal industry's sharp decline, on Aug. 3, 2017.

Trump Can’t Save Coal Country

With eight bankruptcies in the last year—the latest this week—coal is in deep trouble again, and that could spell trouble for Trump in 2020.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador discusses Pemex.

Mexico Tries to Turn Back the Clock on Energy

Forget the energy opening: López Obrador works to restore the primacy of Pemex, the state-owned oil giant.

Sailors watch the sunset atop an F/A-18E Super Hornet on the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt in the 5th Fleet area of operations on March 23, 2018.

Iran-Saudi Crisis Resurrects an Old Question: Does the U.S. Need to Be There at All?

Trump’s reluctance to retaliate against Iran may reflect his belief that an “energy independent” United States no longer needs to protect the region.

Iranian women walk in the capital, Tehran, on Aug. 27. Iran’s economy has struggled with U.S. sanctions and could face even more after last weekend’s attack on Saudi oil facilities.

Trump Sanctions Iran Again, Inching Toward Economic Blockade

But some experts say the move is a weak response to alleged Iranian attacks on Saudi oil.

Now-departed U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton in the Oval Office with President Donald Trump at the White House on Aug. 20,

Bolton Is Gone, but Tensions With Iran Remain High

The departure of Trump’s hawkish national security advisor raised hopes in Washington, but a sudden thaw with Tehran is unlikely.