Ethiopia

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed attends a rally in Ambo, Ethiopia, on April 11, 2018.

Ethiopia’s Year of Reckoning

Ahead of elections in 2020, Ethiopia has many problems to address. Here are our top reads on how Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed came to power and what comes next.

Members of the army carry a coffin covered with the Ethiopian flag in Addis Ababa on June 25, in preparation for the funeral service of the Chief of Staff of the Ethiopian National Defense Force, Seare Mekonnen, who was assassinated on June 22.

Abiy Ahmed’s Reforms Have Unleashed Forces He Can No Longer Control

Ethiopia’s prime minister oversaw the chaotic release of thousands of prisoners, including many ethnonationalist militants. His amnesty may now be coming back to haunt him.

U.S. President Donald Trump fist-bumps Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, during a meeting at the G-20 summit on in Osaka, Japan, on June 28.

The World This Weekend

World leaders converged at the G-20 summit in Osaka, the Trump administration released its Middle East peace plan, and Democratic presidential contenders took the debate stage.

A man reads the Reporter, an Ethiopian newspaper, depicting the portraits of Ambachew Mekonnen, the president of the country’s Ahmara region, and of Gen. Seare Mekonnen, the chief of staff of the Ethiopian National Defense Force, in Addis Ababa on June 24.

Ethiopia Is at a ‘Very Critical Juncture’

After high-level assassinations, the country may still be in danger, says Human Rights Watch expert Felix Horne.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed holds a press conference in Addis Ababa on Aug. 25, 2018. (Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images)

Abiy Ahmed Should Be a Natural Friend for the United States

Seeking the right partners is just as important as avoiding the wrong ones.

Local fishermen’s boats moor at Berbera port, in the breakaway territory of Somaliland, on July 21, 2018. (Mustafa Saeed/AFP/Getty Images)

For Somaliland and Djibouti, Will New Friends Bring Benefits?

Interest in the Horn of Africa from foreign powers has always been a double-edged sword.

People stand near collected debris at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 near Bishoftu, a town southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on March 11. (Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images)

Boeing Insists Its Planes Are Safe. So Why Is the FAA Ordering Fixes?

As the U.S. becomes the last country to ground the 737 Max, pilots say Boeing was quietly scrambling to improve its safety.

Syrian refugees, stuck between the Jordanian and Syrian borders, wait to cross into Jordan at the Hadalat border crossing on Jan. 14, 2016. (Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

Investing in Low-Wage Jobs Is the Wrong Way to Reduce Migration

Unless would-be migrants can build lives with dignity—which poorly paid, export-oriented jobs do not provide—they will continue to seek ways to move on.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

People gather to celebrate the return of the formerly banned anti-government group the Oromo Liberation Front at Mesquel Square in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on Sept. 15, 2018.

Don’t Let Ethiopia Become the Next Yugoslavia

Federations of ethnonational states can become explosive during moments of political liberalization. Abiy Ahmed must tread carefully to avoid a Balkan nightmare.

Zain (Zain Al Rafeea), right, cares for Rahil’s son, Yonas (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole), after 
Rahil is detained in Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum. (Fares Sokhon/Sony Pictures Classics)

Broke in Beirut

In Capernaum, Nadine Labaki finds a new way for film to deal with poverty.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed on October 30, 2018 in Berlin.

Abiy Ahmed Is Not a Populist

The Ethiopian prime minister’s opponents fear that he’s an African Erdogan. His rhetoric and policies suggest he’s more of a liberal democrat.

Somali soldiers patrol Sanguuni military base south of Mogadishu, Somalia, on June 13. (Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images)

Somalia Is a Country Without an Army

The United Nations and foreign powers claim they are dedicated to building up the Somali National Army. Instead, they have become complicit in its dysfunction.

Musician turned politician Robert Kyagulanyi (C) is joined by other activists on July 11, 2018 in Kampala, Uganda during a protest against a controversial tax on the use of social media.

Africa’s Attack on Internet Freedom

While Washington turns a blind eye, autocrats across the continent are muzzling their citizens online.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.