European Union

The symbol of the euro, the currency of the eurozone, stands illuminated in Frankfurt, Germany, on Jan. 21, 2015. (Hannelore Foerster/Getty Images)

The EU’s Dirty Money Blacklist: North Korea, Syria, and… Puerto Rico?

In the latest showdown between Brussels and Washington, the U.S. Treasury Department instructed American banks to ignore new EU anti-money laundering directives.

President Hassan Rouhani speaks to the Iranian parliament in Tehran on Dec. 25, 2018. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Economy Is Crumbling, but Collapse Is a Long Way Off

Things will only get worse under Trump’s sanctions, but China, India, and other countries are still defiantly buying oil.

A man waves a French flag next to an Italian flag, as other protesters wearing a yellow vest demonstrate on December 22, 2018, in Ventimiglia near the French-Italian border.

Italy’s Populists Have Lost Their Luster. They’re Looking to France to Win It Back.

Five Star used to be a protest movement; now it’s the establishment. By bashing Emmanuel Macron and embracing the yellow vest uprising, it’s hoping to restore its radical credentials.

Joan Wong illustration for Foreign Policy/Photos by Andriy OnufriyenkoSTR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

You Only Wish You Had Ukraine’s Democracy

Despite attacks from abroad and corruption at home, Ukrainian democracy isn't failing—it's thriving.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban shake hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu  at the prime minister's office in Jerusalem, Israel, July 19, 2018.

Theodor Herzl Was Willing to Tolerate Europe’s Far-Right. Should Israel’s Leaders Do the Same?

Shunning populist parties won’t make Jews safer. Engaging with them is a matter of realpolitik, and Israel should focus on contemporary threats, not those of the past.

An adaptation of artist Sandro Botticelli’s illustration of Dante’s Divine Comedy. (Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images/Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images/Anthony Devlin/Getty Images/Jack Taylor/Getty Images/Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images/Rob Stothard/Getty Images/John Phillips/Getty Images/Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

The Nine Levels of Brexit Hell

Donald Tusk promised ‘a special place in hell.’ Let Foreign Policy be your guide through Brexit’s Inferno.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron were all smiles just weeks ago on Jan. 22, but that could change after Paris bucked Berlin’s hopes of building a Russian pipeline. (Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images)

France and Germany Face Off Over Russian Pipeline

Though Berlin badly wants it built, Paris is set to side with the EU on new rules intended to contain Moscow.

Chinese pedestrians walk past a Huawei store in Beijing on Jan. 29. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

We Can’t Tell if Chinese Firms Work for the Party

Huawei claims to be an independent firm, but China's own laws mandate a different reality.

Supporters of Felix Tshisekedi, the newly elected president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, hold his portrait and cheer during his inauguration in Kinshasa on Jan. 24. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

How Washington Got on Board With Congo’s Rigged Election

The State Department endorsed Felix Tshisekedi’s unlikely presidency, taking some U.S. officials by surprise.

From left, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, U.K. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas launch the long-awaited special vehicle for Iran trade in Bucharest, Romania, on Jan. 31. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images)

EU Offers Up a Meager Workaround to U.S. Iran Sanctions

The new vehicle will do little to ease Iran’s economic pain, though it should help humanitarian trade.

A fisherman holds a Spanish flag during a protest in the bay of Algeciras, near the Rock of Gibraltar, on August 18, 2013.

As Brexit Looms, the Rock Is in a Hard Place

In Gibraltar, a British territory, 96 percent of the population voted against Brexit, but they are also adamantly opposed to joint rule by Spain. It might be time to reconsider.

A man holds a British passport in front of the flag of the European Union on Oct. 13, 2017 in Bath, England. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

The Great British Race to Get a Second Passport

As hard Brexit looms ever larger on the horizon, British citizens who want to keep living in Europe are taking matters into their own hands.

A migrant rides a bike past greenhouses on January 14, 2019. In southern Spain, the far-right party Vox has attracted farmers with its pledge to deport illegal workers.

Spanish Nationalists Hate Separatists, Not Immigrants

Spain has long resisted the rise of the far-right, because Basque and Catalan separatism animated nationalist passions—but the rise of Vox in Andalusia shows that the country is not immune from xenophobic politics.

A 'Leave Means Leave' sticker on Westminster Bridge near the Houses of Parliament on Jan. 18, in London, England. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Will Brexit Blow Up Britain’s Conservative Party?

Europe has ended the careers of many a Tory prime minister. If Theresa May can’t forge a deal that carries a majority, she could send the party into the political wilderness.

There will be no talks about farm goods, European Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom reiterated, scuppering real hopes for a sweeping trade deal, Jan. 18, 2019. (Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty)

No Sweeping Free Trade Deal, Brussels Tells Washington

The EU’s terms for talks could herald another trade setback for Trump.

Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media at No. 10 Downing St. after her government defeated a vote of no confidence in the House of Commons on Jan. 16. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The Maybot and the Marxist

A stubborn prime minister and an intransigent opposition leader have brought British politics to a standstill. Parliament is poised to seize control of the Brexit process, but that doesn’t necessarily mean a referendum rerun.

A man protests against Brexit outside the Houses of Parliament in London on July 5. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The Beginning of the End of Britain’s Brexit Fantasy

Maybe the worst part of the Brexit boondoggle is that the “better” trade deals the U.K. wanted were probably never going to happen.

A demonstration featuring a papier-mâché Theresa May head outside the Houses of Parliament in London on Jan. 15. (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

A Very British Thrashing

Parliament stomps on May's Brexit dreams.

The Tamar natural gas production platform on March 28, 2013. There is growing regional cooperation on energy in the Eastern Mediterranean, whose natural gas boom kicked off here, off the coast of Israel. (Albatross/Getty Images)

Club Med: Israel, Egypt, and Others Form New Natural Gas Group

The new grouping is meant to jump-start the Eastern Mediterranean’s energy revolution.

A British protester stands in Parliament Square in Westminster, London, on Jan. 14.(Richard Baker / In Pictures/Getty Images)

What to Read on Brexit

Ten things to read or listen to before the British Parliament votes on Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposed plan to leave the European Union.

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