far right parties

People pass a poster depicting French presidential election candidate for the far-right Front National (FN) Marine Le Pen with the face of U.S. President Donald Trump in 2017.

Locked Down at Home, Much of France Is Quietly Rooting for Biden

Trump’s insults and ideological closeness to Marine Le Pen have left a bitter taste.

A supporter of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a demonstration in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28, 2018.

How Brazil Was ‘Ukrainized’

After an obscure—and confusing—term burst into politics, the country’s far-right may be forever changed.

Protesters try to enter the Michigan House of Representatives chamber and are kept out by State Police at the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Michigan on April 30.

Election Violence in the United States Is a Clear and Present Danger

Americans expect election-related instability in faraway countries. Here’s how it could happen at home.

Christina Kampmann, then-family minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, speaks with two children from Syria in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Oct. 26, 2015.

Inside Germany’s Successful and Broken Integration Experiment

Five years after the arrival of more than a million refugees, one city in western Germany is emblematic of all that’s gone right—and wrong.

Rohingya refugees gather behind a barbed wire fence in a temporary settlement set up in the border zone between Myanmar and Bangladesh on April 25, 2018.

The World Needs a New Refugee Convention

For 30 years, right-wing parties and nativist leaders have whittled away refugees’ rights. In the wake of a global pandemic, seeking asylum will be nearly impossible unless the international community revises and modernizes its approach to people fleeing war.

Marine Le Pen shakes hands with French President Emmanuel Macron after their meeting at the Elysée palace in Paris, on Nov. 21, 2017.

Macron’s Not Worried About Islam. He’s Worried About Le Pen.

The French president’s talk of a crisis among French Muslims is the latest example of mainstream politicians pandering to the far-right.  

Coal heavers wear sandwich boards to protest against low wages in 1921.

When Everything Is a Crisis, Nothing Is

Invoking crisis is a favorite tactic of dictators—and widespread misuse of the word robs it of its power. 

Russian ultra-nationalists wave Russian Empire's black-yellow-white flags as they take part in the so-called "Russian March" in central Moscow on November 4, 2012.

The U.S. Government Is Finally Getting Tough on White Nationalist Terrorism

By listing a Russian white supremacist group as a terrorist organization, the Trump administration is sending a long overdue signal to Moscow and the global far-right.

Marian Kotleba, the leader of the right nationalist People's Party-Our Slovakia, walks to his seat during the introduction of delegates to the parliament in Bratislava on March 11, 2016.

Marian Kotleba Wants to Make Slovakia Fascist Again

A party of right-wing extremists is trying to ride a wave of youth support to reshape Slovakia’s government.

Pope Francis eats lunch with guests on Nov. 17 in The Vatican, to mark the World Day of the Poor.

Pope Francis’s Heretical Pasta

Matteo Salvini and the Italian far-right have found a new target in their crusade to marginalize Muslims: pork-free tortellini.

(L-R) Leader of the Dutch Party for Freedom Geert Wilders, Belgian Vlaams Belang party member Gerolf Annemans, Italy's League party leader, Matteo Salvini, president of the French National Rally party, Marine Le Pen, and others at a rally of European nationalists ahead of European elections on May 18 in Milan.

How Europe’s Nationalists Became Internationalists

Many European far-right parties made their mark by railing against the EU. Now they are appealing to a pan-European identity to further their goal of a racially pure, white Christian continent.

Supporters of the Law and Justice party watch the announcement of the results of the Polish parliamentary elections on television screens in Warsaw on Oct. 13.

Poland’s State of the Media

How public television became an outlet for the Law and Justice party—and what it means for democracy.

View of a burnt area of the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, the capital of the Brazilian state of Rondônia, on Aug. 26.

After Brazil’s Summer of Fire, the Militarization of the Amazon Remains

Bolsonaro sent the troops to put out the flames, but now they may be looking to other enemies.

Santiago Abascal, the leader of Spain's far-right Vox party, delivers a speech during a rally southwest of Barcelona on Oct. 31.

The Left Will Govern Spain, but the Far-Right Is the Real Winner

Spain used to be seen as Europe’s exception due to its lack of an ultranationalist xenophobic party. Now the upstart Vox holds more than 50 seats in the parliament.

An armed Libyan coast guardsman stands on a boat after the interception of 147 migrants attempting to reach Europe near the coastal town of Zawiyah on June 27, 2017.

The West’s Obsession With Border Security Is Breeding Instability

In the name of fighting illegal immigration, the EU, the United States, and Australia are emboldening authoritarian regimes, fueling abuses and corruption, and stoking intolerance at home.

Demonstrators hold posters of U.S. President Donald Trump depicted as Adolf Hitler during the Women's March in Barcelona on Jan. 21.

Don’t Call Donald Trump a Fascist

What it means to brand today’s right-wing leaders with the F-word—and why you probably shouldn’t.

A woman walks past campaign posters for candidates of the Law and Justice party in Warsaw, Poland, on Oct. 9.

A Tale of Two Polands

The Law and Justice party is tapping into divides that have split the country for centuries—and will probably win this weekend’s elections because of it.

Riot police protect a pride parade amid risks of disruption by far-right opponents in Plock, central Poland, on Aug. 10.

In Poland’s Upcoming Election, the Law and Justice Party Is Demonizing the LGBT Community to Win

The party is likely to win the vote, but it may eventually lose the broader cultural fight.

Participants seen holding flags during the National Rosary

Why Poland’s Populists Keep Winning

PiS won by offering provincial voters social benefits that transformed their lives. If Poland’s opposition wants to defeat the illiberal ruling party, it will have to offer an alternative welfare state model.

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