far right parties

Swedish Speaker of Parliament Andreas Norlen (L) meets with Moderate party leader Ulf Kristersson (R) at the Parliament in Stockholm on September 27, 2018.

Swedish Leaders Will Try Anything to Shut Out the Far-Right

No one wants to enter a coalition with the Sweden Democrats, so the country is resorting to desperate and untested measures to form a new government.

U.S. President Donald Trump waves to reporters as he and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (R) leave the weekly Senate Republican Policy Committee luncheon in the U.S. Capitol on Nov. 28, 2017.

When Fighting Domestic Terrorism, You Get What You Pay For

The Trump administration has gutted the budget for fighting far-right extremists, making it harder to stop attacks like the Pittsburgh massacre.

A man reads newspaper headlines announcing Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in the Brazil’s presidential election in São Paulo on Oct. 29. (Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Military Is Not the Problem

Democracy will depend on whether civilians can exploit rifts between Bolsonaro and his base while regaining voter trust.

A single tree stands in a deforested area of Pará on Oct. 14. (Raphael Alves/AFP/Getty Images)

To Gut the Amazon, Bolsonaro Needs Local Help

The Brazilian president-elect can’t pursue his environmental policies on his own. After this weekend’s state elections, he’ll have the backing he needs.

Jair Bolsonaro waves to the crowd during a military event in São Paulo on May 3. (Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

The Military Is Back in Brazil

From security to economic policy, under Jair Bolsonaro, the armed forces will be a major player in politics.

Brazilian Workers’ Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad campaigns on Oct. 27 in São Paulo. (Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)

‘Brazil Needs Peace and Not Hate’

Ahead of a runoff presidential election, Workers’ Party candidate Fernando Haddad spoke with Foreign Policy about Brazil’s future.

Demonstrators take part in a protest against Brazilian right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 20. (Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

How Women Could Win It for Bolsonaro

Brazil’s far-right presidential front-runner made hateful comments a hallmark of his political life. That hasn’t held him back.

A supporter of Brazil's far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a rally in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 21. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Just the Right That’s Voting for Bolsonaro. It’s Everyone.

Brazil’s populist firebrand is relying on conservative values, fear of crime, anger about corruption, and rampant fake news to gain support from across the political spectrum.

Italy's populist Five Star Movement leader Luigi Di Maio (R) with party members Roberto Fico (L) and Alessandro Di Battista (C) after an election campaign meeting in Piazza del Popolo in Rome on March 2, 2018.

Italy’s Left-Wing Populists Won’t Stop the Far-Right. They’ll Strengthen It.

The Five Star Movement’s most prominent leftist, Alessandro Di Battista, is returning to politics, but don’t expect him to reverse the government’s anti-immigrant agenda.

Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, co-leaders of the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, arrive to speak on immigration and crime on September 18, 2017 in Berlin.

The Party Is Over

The mass political movements that once dominated Europe are fading fast—and the nationalist populists and upstart parties taking their place are here to stay.

People carry German flags and a banner which reads "Stop Islamization" during a march organized by the far-right AfD party in Rostock,  Germany on September 22, 2018.

Germany’s New Politics of Cultural Despair

Will the return of the European far-right be the undoing of the West?

Katharina Schulze, the lead candidate for the Greens, speaks at the Gillamoos folk fest in Abensberg on Sept. 3. (Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images)

In Bavaria, Green Could Be King

Forget the rise of the AfD. The real story in this weekend’s elections may well be the rise of the Greens, which will reshape German politics.

A Swedish flag is seen in Malmo on June 6, 2015. (Harry Engels/Getty Images)

Is Sweden Ungovernable?

The rise of populist parties has made it nearly impossible to form governments across Europe—and the deadlock only fuels support for populists.

Kotryna Zukauskaite illustration for Foreign Policy

Germany’s Return of the Repressed 

The country’s far-right wants to revive ethnic nationalism. The left must come up with its own alternative.

The leader of the far-right League party, Matteo Salvini (R), embraces Silvio Berlusconi during a joint press conference in Rome on March 1, 2018.

In Italy, a Right-Wing Spin Doctor Repents

How Silvio Berlusconi’s top propagandist become one of Matteo Salvini’s toughest critics.

Austria's Interior Minister Herbert Kickl (L), Italy's Interior Minister and deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini (R) and Austria's Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache (C) arrive to give a joint press conference at the end of their meeting at the Viminale palace in Rome on June 20, 2018.

Eastern Europe’s Populists Don’t Care About Italy

Matteo Salvini wants to be buddies with anti-immigrant leaders in Hungary, Poland, and Austria. But sometimes geography trumps ideology.

Markus Söder of the Bavarian Christian Social Union and the new governor of Bavaria conducts a  brass band at the Bavarian state parliament on March 16, 2018 in Munich, Germany.

How Far Will Bavaria’s CSU Go to Fend Off Germany’s Far-Right?

Angela Merkel’s sister party, the Christian Social Union, is taking an extreme line on refugees and threatening to bring down her coalition.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Bavarian Governor and leader of the Bavarian Christian Social Union (CSU) Horst Seehofer depart after speaking to the media on October 9, 2017 in Berlin.

In Europe, the Only Choice Is Right or Far-Right

As left-wing parties have collapsed, the sole option remaining for voters is conservatism or right-wing populism.

Gabor Vona (center), leader of the Hungarian far-right Jobbik party with his wife and son  casting his ballot for the European Parliment elections on May 25, 2014 at a local polling station in Budapest.

How Hungary’s Far-Right Extremists Became Warm and Fuzzy

The Jobbik party, once known for its overt racism and anti-Semitism, is trying to reinvent itself as the responsible voice of the center.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.