Finance and Banking

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky

Ukraine’s Debt Problem Spells Trouble

If the government continues to pile up debt without necessary reforms, it will set its economy on the road to ruin.

An illustration describing the state of Dogecoin in "doge" speak.

Confused About Dogecoin? Here’s How It (Doesn’t) Work.

Even the best-intentioned cryptocurrencies can become scams.

$100 bills are printed at the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington on May 20, 2013.

Is Fair Banking Unfair?

To stay viable, banks need to be able to make choices about creditworthiness. But they need better ways for deciding how.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden at the Queen theater in Wilmington, Delaware, on Dec. 19.

Why Biden Needs to Confront Corruption

If the U.S. president-elect is serious about restoring the rule of law and democracy, he needs to first tackle the global menace of graft.

Then-Commodity Futures Trading Commission Chairman Gary Gensler

Watch Out Wall Street: Biden May Be Coming for You

His new financial advisors include some of the toughest proponents of banking regulation from the 2008 financial crisis.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden delivers a speech during the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 20, 2016.

The Markets Want Much More Than Just a Biden Win

The global economy is in bad shape—and Big Capital knows that only a blue wave can start fixing it.

U.S. President Donald Trump on the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5 in Washington, DC.

Investors Are Already Treating America Like an Emerging Market

Election chaos, social unrest, and weak institutions make the United States too risky for a developed economy.

A man walks through the U.S. Capitol Rotunda

The U.S. Is a Haven for Money Laundering. That Might Be About to Change.

Tucked into the sprawling defense authorization bill are measures to create a corporate ownership registry, which would plug one of America’s glaring gaps.

A woman wearing a face mask sits at a bus stop in Paris on April 21.

How Capital Markets Can Contain the Coronavirus

As governments and central banks run out of fiscal stimulus options, COVID-19 social bonds could be critical in softening the economic blow.

Pedestrians wearing face masks walk toward an electric board showing stocks' share price

Is the Coronavirus Crash Worse Than the 2008 Financial Crisis?

The last global economic crisis was a financial heart attack. This one might be a full-body seizure.

Deutsche Bank offices in Los Angeles

Beyond Deutsche: U.S. Banks Also Implicated in Dubious Partnerships Abroad

Investigators say big banks in the United States and elsewhere too often fail to do due diligence on investors.

$100 notes are printed at the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, D.C., on May 20, 2013.

The Democratic People’s Republic of U.S. Monetary Policy

Congress is outsourcing more and more policymaking to the Federal Reserve.

Pedestrians walk past an electronic billboard displaying the Hang Seng Index in negative territory on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange

China Still Needs Hong Kong

The Alibaba listing shows how critical the city is for the financial future.

An Indian woman displays her 2000 rupee notes as she has her finger inked with indelible ink after exchanging withdrawn 500 and 1000 rupee banknotes at a bank in Chennai on November 17, 2016.

Protecting Women Will Make You Money

Big investors are starting to use a new metric to assess financial risk: rates of gender-based violence.

In China’s Credit Ratings, Democracies Pay a Price

Data from Chinese firms shows a Beijing-dominated world would be a financial boost for autocrats.

A investor monitors stock prices at a securities company in Hangzhou in China's eastern Zhejiang province on October 18, 2018.

The United States Is Going After China’s Banks

Using the financial 'death penalty' may be dangerous overreach.

Load 10 More Articles