Finance

Sudanese Foreign Minister Al-Dirdiri Mohamed Ahmed gives a press conference in Khartoum on June 24. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Administration Gives Sudan a Way to Come in From the Cold

The United States should stop listing Sudan as a state sponsor of terrorism, Sudanese foreign minister tells FP, as Khartoum seeks to boost its crumbling economy.

A collection of coins from all over the world is pictured in Milan, Italy, on Dec. 9, 2011. (Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images)

Financial Crimes and Punishment

China is now in charge of one of the world’s most important watchdogs. Here’s how it is treating allies like Pakistan.

Ships in the Port Louis harbor in Mauritius on Dec. 25, 2015. (T. Vale/Getty Images)

African Governments Are Paying for the World Bank’s Mauritius Miracle

Ghost offices on the small island provide legal but questionable means of siphoning tax dollars away from poor countries and into the pockets of the global elite.

The Danske Bank building in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The Danske Bank Scandal Is the Tip of the Iceberg

Financial institutions and the governments that regulate them aren’t doing nearly enough to prevent money laundering.  

Conservative members of Parliament Jacob Rees-Mogg, Boris Johnson, and Peter Bone listen during the launch of "A World Trade Deal: The Complete Guide" at the Houses of Parliament on September 11, 2018 in London, England.

A No-Deal Brexit Will Destroy the British Economy

The magical wing of the Conservative Party believes that Britain can crash out of the European Union painlessly. It is leading the country into a recession.

Two employees of Christie’s auction house maneuver the Lehman Brothers corporate logo before placing it in an auction on Sept. 24, 2010. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

How the Tariff War Could Turn Into the Next Lehman

A decade on, we still don’t get the deeper interconnections in the global economic system—or how it could blow up again.

Alipay and WeChat QR codes for online payment are displayed at a meat stall at a market in Nantong in China's eastern Jiangsu province. Sept. 10.(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

China Can’t Afford a Cashless Society

A mania for mobile payments is leaving the poor behind.

French Economy  Minister Bruno Le Maire addresses a conference  on February 15, 2018 at the Economy Ministry in Paris.

OFAC Off

The European Union needs to defend its economic sovereignty from U.S. overreach. Creating its own agency for sanctions enforcement would be a start.

A Chinese worker loads coal into a furnace on November 3, 2016 in Inner Mongolia, China. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

China’s Zombie Firms Can’t Lurch Forever

As state-backed companies' debts mount, China faces an inevitable slowdown.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and his German counterpart, Sigmar Gabriel, speak to the media following talks in Berlin on June 27, 2017. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Europe’s Sanctions-Blocking Threats Are Empty

When it comes to Iran sanctions, the EU must satisfy Trump’s demands. Access to the U.S. financial system hangs in the balance.

Bitcoin and other financial innovations are proliferating, Jan. 1, 2013. (Zach Copley/Flickr)

U.S. Sanctions Weapon Is Under Threat — but Not From Bitcoin

Forget cryptocurrencies. The real threat to American sanctions power is rapid technological innovation in finance.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman and the landscape near the planned city of Neom.
 (Foreign Policy illustration/Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images/NEOM)

Saudi Arabia Is Betting Its Future on a Desert Megacity

Can Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s ambitious plans jumpstart social and economic reform, or are they an expensive miscalculation?

The sign and logo of Wanda Group, a Chinese multinational conglomerate corporation and FIFA partner, on Oct. 13, 2016 at FIFA headquarters in Zurich. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s No Accident That China’s Tycoons Are Bad Investors

The first priority for wealthy Chinese has been to move as much money abroad as possible. If Beijing has its way, that won't be an option anymore.

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 22: Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif arrives at the White House October 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Prime Minister participated in a bi-lateral meeting with President Barack Obama in the Oval Office. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Downfall of Nawaz Sharif and the Triumph of Stupidity

Pakistan’s democracy is stronger with the removal of the prime minister on corruption charges. But the primacy of the armed forces remains intact.

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China’s Seen Globally As Gaining Ground on United States

The world is souring on the U.S. and Trump and taking a shine to China despite all its struggles.

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As America Retreats, the World Moves Forward on Trade

American companies might not feel it yet, but they’re already falling behind their foreign competitors.

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Japanese Retail Giant to Stop Selling Ivory

But without a significant turnaround, elephants could be on their way to extinction.

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China Opens Its Bond Market To International Investors

Wall Street has long wanted to invest in Chinese debt.

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Islamic State Revenues Down 80 Percent from 2015

A new report says the caliphate’s days are numbered.

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