First Person

U.S. soldiers sweep through an abandoned house during heavy fighting in the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah, Iraq, on Nov. 9, 2004.

A U.S. Marine Looks Back at Fallujah

On the podcast: Elliot Ackerman served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Emergency personnel search for wounded people after a bomb exploded at the Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires on July 18, 1994.

Argentina, Iran, and the Enduring Mystery Surrounding the Death of a Special Prosecutor

On the podcast: Alberto Nisman accused Argentina’s president of covering up Iran’s role in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires. Then he was shot in the head.

Undocumented youth and allies begin the Walk to Stay Home, a 15-day walk from New York City’s Battery Park to Washington’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, on Feb. 15, 2018.

A Dream Deferred

On the podcast: The journalist Laura Wides-Muñoz traces the lives of several immigrants brought illegally to the United States as children.

Brazil's future Minister of Justice, Sergio Moro, gestures during a national forum on combatting corruption in Rio de Janeiro on Nov. 23, 2018. CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

The Dirty Residue of Brazil’s Car Wash Probe

On the podcast: The editor in chief of Americas Quarterly explains why investigators are now under scrutiny in Brazil’s largest corruption inquiry.

Egyptian presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo on June 13, 2012. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Mohamed Morsi and the Passing of Egypt’s Democratic Moment

On the podcast: Shadi Hamid recounts the rise and fall of Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.

Protesters attend a rally against a controversial extradition law in Hong Kong on June 9.

How an Extradition Bill Became a Red Line for Hong Kongers

On the podcast: A former China correspondent traces Beijing’s gradual effort to erode human rights in Hong Kong.

Climbers line a path on Mount Everest in Nepal on May 22. Rizza Alee/AP

Death and Debris at 30,000 Feet

On the podcast: An American adventurer describes climbing over bodies to reach the top of Mount Everest.

Palestinian children inspect a bullet-riddled wall in Gaza City on April 16, 2008, following an Israeli military operation. MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images

Shot by Israelis, Healed by Israelis

On the podcast: Yousef Bashir describes growing up in Gaza during the second Palestinian uprising.

“Yes” campaigners wait for the official result in the Irish referendum vote to overturn the country’s abortion ban at Dublin Castle in Dublin on May 26, 2018.

The Referendum That Changed Ireland

On the podcast: A look back at the vote in Ireland that ended the abortion ban.

On the First Person podcast: Stephen M. Walt talks with George Packer about Richard Holbrooke, America’s long-serving diplomat.

How Richard Holbrooke Represented America’s Best and Worst Impulses

On the podcast: George Packer, in conversation with Stephen M. Walt, on America’s long-serving diplomat.

Algerian protesters wave a national flag as they take part in a demonstration in the capital of Algiers on May 3.

How Algerians Ousted Bouteflika

On the podcast: Algeria’s Arab Spring has been peaceful so far, but its future remains uncertain.

A demonstrator blocks the path of a tank convoy near Tiananmen Square in Beijing in 1989. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

Thirty Years After Tiananmen Square

On the podcast: A look back at the student protests that changed China’s trajectory.

A woman mourns over a relative's grave at the Srebrenica-Potocari Memorial and Cemetery on Nov. 22, 2017. (Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images)

The Butcher of Bosnia on Trial

On the podcast: A film on the war in Bosnia probes the psychology of genocide and justice.

Supporters attend a pro-government rally for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv in in March 2015. (Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images)

How Israel’s Netanyahu Uses Fear and Loathing to Win Elections

On the podcast: The Israeli journalist Anshel Pfeffer looks back at Bibi’s first general election campaign in 1996.

Farah Pandith on April 6, 2016.  (Jemal Countess/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

How to Defeat Political and Religious Extremism

On the podcast: A former State Department official who led the outreach to the Muslim world after the 9/11 attacks.

Smoke and fire billow after a shelling on the Islamic State’s last holdout of Baghouz, in the eastern Syrian Deir Ezzor province, on March 3. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Inside the Fall of the Islamic State

On the podcast: A reporter who embedded with U.S.-backed forces in Syria describes the battles there.

Workers spray contaminated houses within the “no-go” cordon around Chernobyl (Igor Kostin/Sygma via Getty Images)

Meltdown at Chernobyl

On the podcast: A journalist reconstructs the world’s worst nuclear disaster.

Eliot Higgins in December 2018. (Claudia Leisinger for Foreign Policy)

How Citizen Journalists Solved the Mystery of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17

On the podcast: The founder of the group Bellingcat on using open sources to investigate war crimes and abuses.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom speaks during a news conference in Berlin on April 10, 2018. (Wolfgang Kumm/Picture Alliance via Getty Images)

Toward a More Feminist Foreign Policy

On the podcast: Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom on how to give women a voice in an arena dominated by men.

A guard watchtower rises above a perimeter fence of what is officially known as a "vocational skills education center" for Uighur Muslims in Dabancheng in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

China’s War on Uighurs

On the podcast: A Uighur journalist in exile tells her family’s story.

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