France

French Economy  Minister Bruno Le Maire addresses a conference  on February 15, 2018 at the Economy Ministry in Paris.

OFAC Off

The European Union needs to defend its economic sovereignty from U.S. overreach. Creating its own agency for sanctions enforcement would be a start.

G-7 leaders participate in a working session in Quebec, Canada, on June 8. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States and Europe Still Need Each Other

In the run-up to the G-7 summit, Trump seemed to forget a key lesson from history.

French President Emmanuel Macron at the Felix Eboue Airport of Cayenne, in French Guiana, on October 26, 2017. (RONAN LIETAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Macron Has Changed France’s Political DNA

One year after his election, it's clear Emmanuel Macron isn't just a president — he's a liberal man of providence.

French president Emmanuel Macron speaks with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in Sydney on May 2. (Jason McCawley - Pool/Getty Images)

Macron’s Fake News Solution Is a Problem

A new French law aims to separate truth from fiction, but it will mostly just give the government more control over the media.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Bavarian Governor and leader of the Bavarian Christian Social Union (CSU) Horst Seehofer depart after speaking to the media on October 9, 2017 in Berlin.

In Europe, the Only Choice Is Right or Far-Right

As left-wing parties have collapsed, the sole option remaining for voters is conservatism or right-wing populism.

France's President Emmanuel Macron addresses students at the North Rhine-Westphalia technical university on May 10, 2018 in Aachen, Germany (above); Supporters and elected officials of the far-right Front National protest the French government's immigration policies near the National Assembly on April 20, 2018 in Paris (below).

Saving European Democracy Starts at Home

If French President Emmanuel Macron is serious about pushing back against xenophobic populists, he needs to revamp his own legislative agenda.

Angela Merkel, Emmanuel Macron, Donald Trump, and other leaders depart after posing for the group photo at the G7  summit on May 26, 2017 in Taormina, Italy.

How Europe Can Block Trump

After Washington exits the Iran deal, U.S. secondary sanctions could harm European companies. EU leaders should retaliate by reviving a tool used successfully in the 1990s.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron gesture on the balcony of the town hall of Aachen after Macron recieved the International Charlemagne Prize at a ceremony on May 10, 2018 in Aachen, Germany. (Lukas Schulze/Getty Images,)

RIP the Trans-Atlantic Alliance, 1945-2018

The partnership with America had a long and fruitful life — but Europe is ready to start over.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, clears dandruff off French President Emmanuel Macron's jacket in the White House Oval Office in Washington on April 24. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

Macron Is Too Weak to Lead the Free World

Angela Merkel may have ceded her crown to France’s president. But neither can supplant Donald Trump.

British Prime Minister Theresa May, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron following a meeting on the sidelines of the European Union leaders summit in Brussels, on March 22, 2018. (LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Has No Clue How to Handle an American Bully

Germany, France, and the U.K. all tried sucking up to Trump. They ended up helping kill the Iran deal.

MEK supporters demonstrate outside the Iranian embassy in Berlin, Germany on Dec. 28, 2009.  (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Bolton’s Ascent Gives Iranian Group a New Lease on Life

With a supporter in the White House, the MEK might finally have a voice in U.S. policy.

The wax figures of U.S. President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel are pictured in Christmas-themed sweaters at the Grevin Wax Museum in Paris on Dec. 1, 2017. (Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

Merkel Has Disastrously Bungled Her Relationship With Trump

The chancellor’s approach has been typical of German foreign policy: moralistic, hypocritical — and completely ineffective.

Emmanuel Macron arrives on the first day of a summit of European Union (EU) leaders at the EU headquarters in Brussels, on March 22, 2018. (JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Macron’s Centrism Is Coming Apart at the Seams

The French president spent his first year steering his country to the right — and his supporters on the left are starting to wonder what they signed up for.

Soldiers from the Foreign Legion march down the Champs Elysees, with the Arc de Triomphe in the background,  in Paris during a rehearsal of the annual Bastille Day military parade on July 10, 2017. (Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images)

Army Service Could Be the Answer to Europe’s Integration Problem

The EU’s defense forces are struggling to recruit, and immigrants are often eager to serve.

Emmanuel Macron with students during the inauguration of an apprentice training centre in Tours on March 14, 2018.  (BENOIT TESSIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Everyone in France Wants to Claim the Legacy of 1968

Leftists want to celebrate revolutionary idealism; conservatives, the triumph of traditional authority. And Emmanuel Macron is trying to split the difference.

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