Germany

Assistants await patients at a check-in counter for vaccinations against COVID-19 at the converted Merkur-Arena in Düsseldorf, Germany on Dec. 1.

Where Do Things Stand With the COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout?

The U.K.’s quick approval of the Pfizer vaccine means some Britons will get shots starting next week—but in the rest of the world, it’s going to take a while for regular people to get inoculated.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden

The World Calls Biden, While Trump and Company Double Down

Major world leaders are reaching out to the U.S. president-elect as Pompeo claims there will be a “smooth transition to a second Trump administration.”

U.S. President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 17, 2017.

The Last Throes of Trump’s Wounded Alpha-Male Ego

What Angela Merkel’s approach to a blustering incumbent can teach us about America’s political crisis today.

A partially-masked man walks in Pfarrkirchen, a town in Bavaria, on Oct. 27 after a local lockdown was imposed.

They Conquered COVID-19. Now They’re Struggling.

From the Czech Republic and Germany to the Indian state of Kerala, governments that dealt decisively with the first wave of the coronavirus are drowning in the second wave.

Filippo Grandi, the commissioner of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, at an IDP camp

Our Top Weekend Reads

The U.N.’s diversity problem, why Americans are giving up on democracy, and Germany’s successful—yet broken—integration experiment.

Christina Kampmann, then-family minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, speaks with two children from Syria in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Oct. 26, 2015.

Inside Germany’s Successful and Broken Integration Experiment

Five years after the arrival of more than a million refugees, one city in western Germany is emblematic of all that’s gone right—and wrong.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel gives a speech during a press conference at the end of a meeting with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Beijing on Sept. 6, 2019.

Merkel’s China Reset Is Mostly Hollow

Washington shouldn’t expect—and may not need—a coordinated policy with Berlin.

A sculpture of a heart in the colors of the German flag reads “30 years” as part of an outdoor exhibition marking the upcoming 30th anniversary of German reunification in Potsdam on Sept. 17.

Gorbachev Was Right About German Reunification

Thatcher and Mitterrand nearly stopped it from happening, but 30 years on, reunification remains the world’s most successful geopolitical experiment.

Querdenker, or “lateral thinker,” is written on the sign of a participant at a march against Germany’s COVID-19 measures across the Oberkassel Bridge in Düsseldorf on Sept. 20.

Germany’s Lateral Thinkers, Unite

The Querdenker protests against coronavirus prevention measures sweeping the country’s cities show that free speech is alive and well.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is shown during a video meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Berlin on Sept. 14.

China Is Merkel’s Biggest Failure in Office

The German chancellor has put future deals over moral values, but she’s not alone.

Riot police observe far-right protesters gathered outside the Reichstag during protests against coronavirus-related restrictions and government policy on Aug. 29 in Berlin.

Germany Is Losing the Fight Against QAnon

The German government beat back the coronavirus pandemic—but has largely given up against conspiracy theories.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron.

Trump Under Pressure From Democrats to Drop Diplomat Nominee Over Racist Remarks

The retired colonel called refugees fleeing Middle East violence “unwanted Muslim invaders.”

Somali children in a camp for displaced people after hundreds fled U.S. airstrikes against al-Shabab in Baidoa, autonomous South West State of Somalia, on Dec. 18, 2018.

Some Germans Will Be Happy to See U.S. Troops Leave

Left-wing groups say the troop presence has made Germany complicit in U.S. drone wars.

The Akademik Cherskiy pipe-laying vessel is seen in the Gulf of Gdansk in the Baltic Sea on May 4. According to Russia's energy minister, the ship could be involved in the construction of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline.

The U.S. Is Close to Killing Russia’s Nord Stream 2 Pipeline

But it’s a race between slow construction and slower sanctions.

A U.S. serviceman bids farewell to his friend prior to the departure of a detachment of U.S. military police by train from the Coleman Barracks in Mannheim, Germany to Bosnia via Hungary in 1995.

Auf Wiedersehen to a Mostly Successful, Sometimes Rocky Arranged Marriage

From economic woes to racial strife, America’s troop presence in Germany hasn’t always been easy. But it always made an impact.

German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer speaks to the media to present the Bundeswehr's new volunteer service program on July 23, in Berlin.

Ask What You Can Do for Your Country

Western countries need national service programs, and Germany is leading the way.

The main gate of the United States European Command headquarters at the Patch Barracks.

‘It’s Hard to Be in Limbo,’ as COVID-19 Plays Havoc With Military Moves

It’s hard enough to make a permanent change of station overseas. Military families are finding it agonizing in a pandemic-torn world.

Coal heavers wear sandwich boards to protest against low wages in 1921.

When Everything Is a Crisis, Nothing Is

Invoking crisis is a favorite tactic of dictators—and widespread misuse of the word robs it of its power. 

Load 10 More Articles