Germany

John Bolton and Donald Trump

Bolton’s Book Is a Terrifying Warning About What Trump Could Still Do

Geopolitical ignorance is no longer funny when it impacts U.S. national security.

People wearing face masks walk in front of a euro sign in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, on April, 24.

Germany Is Finally Ready to Spend

In the long run, the COVID-19 pandemic may change Europe’s economy for the better.

A German soldier holds a machine gun during military exercises near Bergen, Germany, on Oct. 14, 2016.

The Sorry State of Germany’s Armed Forces

Trump’s calls to withdraw U.S. troops from the country are impulsive, but Germany isn’t blameless.

The U.S. air base in Ramstein, Germany

The United States Needs German Bases More Than Germany Does

Bases in Europe have always aided American hegemony more than local defense.

A family watches Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's address to the nation on a television at their home in Amritsar on March 24.

Leaders Can’t Lift Lockdowns Without Public Trust

Germany’s reopening is working because Angela Merkel treats citizens like adults; China’s is succeeding because people see results. In India, there’s no trust—and little evidence of progress.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel poses with a toy wind wheel during the opening of the Arkona wind park in Sassnitz, northern Germany, on April 16, 2019.

Has the Coronavirus Disappeared Climate Politics?

Europe’s pandemic bailouts are trying to save the continent’s economy. Less clear is if they can save the planet.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron

Are the Germans Edging Closer to True Fiscal Union?

In a striking reversal, Merkel joins with France in recommending a euro fund that could be a timid first step toward greater integration.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel uses a smartphone while she attends a session of the Bundestag in Berlin on July 3, 2015.

Germany’s Angst Is Killing Its Coronavirus Tracing App

Berlin’s floundering tells an ominous story about Europe’s technological leadership during the pandemic—and afterward.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives to address a press conference in Berlin on April 23 after taking part in a video conference with EU leaders.

Forget Washington and Beijing. These Days Global Leadership Comes From Berlin.

People love to hate Germany—but the country is doing far more than most nations to help its European neighbors fight the coronavirus.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis removes his face mask after attending the departure of unaccompanied minors who were living in migrant camps on the Greek islands to travel on a special flight to Germany at Athens International Airport on April 18.

In Europe, the Lives of Refugees Are on Hold

The pandemic proves a mixed blessing: Deportations are suspended but so is health care.

Bavarian Premier Markus Söder

Germany Found a Strongman for Its Coronavirus Crisis

The Bavarian governor’s law-and-order paternalism has been extraordinarily popular—and could shape the country’s post-Merkel future.

A drawing by Augustus Tholey depicting leaders of the Continental Congress in 1775 (from left): John Adams, Robert Morris, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson.

Europe Needs an Alexander Hamilton, Not More Budget Hawks

Without mutual debt in the form of Eurobonds, the continent’s economic crisis will get worse, Euroskepticism will increase, and the EU could fall apart.

Alexander Gauland (foreground), the parliamentary group co-leader of Germany's far-right Alternative for Germany, and members of his party's parliamentary group attend a session at the Bundestag, Germany's lower house of parliament, in Berlin on March 25.

The Coronavirus Has Paralyzed Europe’s Far-Right

The continent’s borders are closed, as extreme nationalists always wanted—but they’re one of the pandemic's victims anyway.

Stephen Greene works a street corner hoping to land a job as a laborer or carpenter in Pompano Beach, Florida, on June 3, 2011.

America Is Having an Unemployment Apocalypse. Europe Chose Not to.

A trans-Atlantic chasm has opened up on pandemic labor policy. We’ll soon know which side got it right.

North vs. South: The Netherlands competes against Spain in the 2010 FIFA World Cup Final in Johannesburg on July 11, 2010. The Netherlands, like Germany, is resisting Southern Europe’s calls for fiscal solidarity as the coronavirus causes economic chaos across the continent.

Fighting Pandemic, Europe Divides Again Along North and South Lines

Southern countries push for a eurobond while the wealthy North says “nein.”

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