Guyana

Voters cast their ballots at a polling station.

Does Guyana Foretell an American Future?

A disputed election. Racialized parties. A constitutional crisis. Washington already has a model for what could go wrong.

A street vendor sits next to banners of the presidential candidate for the National Unity and Alliance for Change party (APNU+AFC) David Granger, in Georgetown, Guyana, on March 1, 2020.

Ethnic Conflict Threatens Democracy in Guyana

The country’s simmering ethnic tensions threaten to undermine a fragile democratic system and bring on the resource curse before the proceeds from massive offshore oil discoveries arrive.

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

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CIA Meddling, Race Riots, and a Phantom Death Squad

Why a tiny South American country can't escape the ugly legacies of its idiosyncratic past.

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An Oil Strike in No Man’s Land

A new oil field near Venezuela could be the miracle Maduro was waiting for. There's just one problem — it's in territory claimed by Guyana.

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