hacking

A person walks past a 12-story building alleged in a report on Feb. 19, 2013, by the internet security firm Mandiant as the home of a Chinese military-led hacking group after the firm reportedly traced a host of cyberattacks to the building in Shanghai's northern suburb of Gaoqiao. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

In Chinese Spy Ops, Something Old, Something New

Indictments reveal how Beijing mixes traditional spycraft with cyberespionage to steal U.S. technology.

Print

The Rise of the Cyber-Mercenaries

What happens when private firms have cyberweapons as powerful as those owned by governments?

Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces and future U.S. president, General Dwight D. Eisenhower (L) with British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (R), his deputy commander, in an unknown location in June 1944 after Allied forces stormed the Normandy beaches.

Washington Needs a New Solarium Project To Counter Cyberthreats

President Eisenhower confronted the unprecedented nuclear threat of the 1950s with a novel exercise. The United States needs a similar approach to tackle today's cyber threats.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un celebrates the successful test-firing of an intercontinental ballistic missile on July 4, 2017. (AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS/Getty Images)

North Korean Destructive Malware Is Back, Says DHS Report

Malware not seen since the 2014 attack on Sony has returned, raising the possibility of future destructive attacks.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks to lawmakers on Capitol Hill on April 10. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Zuckerberg: We’re in an ‘Arms Race’ With Russia, but AI Will Save Us

Buckle up — the technology won’t be ready for another decade.

A bird sitting on the head of a white rhino at Kruger National Park in South Africa on June 22, 2010.   (PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)

Size Doesn’t Matter for Spies Anymore

In the era of cyber-espionage, even the smallest countries can play on the biggest stage.

A flame from a Saudi Aramco oil installation  burns brightly during sunset in the Saudi desert on June 23, 2008.
 (AFP/Marwan Naamani)

Cyberattack Targets Safety System at Saudi Aramco

One report points to Iran, but the evidence is far from conclusive.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un looks on during the launch of a Hwasong-12 missile. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

White House Blames North Korea for Global Ransomware Outbreak

The announcement comes amid heightening tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

A U.S. flag is adjusted ahead of a news conference between U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing on Jan. 27, 2016. (Jacquelyn Martin/AFP/Getty Images)

Feds Quietly Reveal Chinese State-Backed Hacking Operation

Prosecutors say Chinese hackers from a mysterious cybersecurity firm stole corporate secrets from three big firms.

U.S. navy aircraft on the deck of the USS Enterprise on the first day of the Battle of Midway.

The Quantum Gap with China

China has ramped up its investment in developing quantum technologies, but few understand the impacts of losing this modern-day space race.

(FILES) A photo taken on March 10, 2011 of Russian anti-virus program developer and CEO of Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab, Yevgeny Kaspersky giving an interview to AFP at his company's offices in Moscow. The son of Russian software tycoon Eugene Kaspersky has been kidnapped in Moscow and his abductors are demanding a 3 million euro ($4.4 million) ransom for his release, reports said on April 21, 2011. The Lifenews.ru news website said that unknown men abducted Ivan Kaspersky, 20, on Tuesday morning and then made the ransom demand to his father by phone.AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV (Photo credit should read Alexey SAZONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Feds Ban Government Use of Kaspersky Software

The Russian firm’s products have been deemed an 'unacceptable risk.'

GettyImages-166033416cop

Russian Hackers Can’t Beat German Democracy

Of course the Kremlin is going to try to hack Germany’s upcoming election. But it’s not going to succeed.

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 20:  (L-R) Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe other law enforcement officials hold a news conference to announce an 'international cybercrime enforcement action' at the Department of Justice July 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump said Wednesday in an interview with the New York Times that he never would have appointed Sessions had he known Sessions would recuse himself from overseeing the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. "Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job and I would have picked somebody else," Trump said.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Feds Shut Down World’s Largest Online Drug Marketplace

Billed as a landmark operation, U.S. law enforcement strikes at dark web drug dealers.

Republican nominee Donald Trump (R) stands with his son  Donald Trump Jr. after the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

What Did Trump Know About His Son’s Meeting, and When Did He Know It?

The administration has resorted to slippery statements and obfuscations, but the truth is closing in around it.

ukraine cyber

Ukraine Hit by Massive Cyberattack

It’s unclear who or what is behind it.

TOPSHOT - This picture taken on May 14, 2017 and released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 15 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (2nd L) reacting during a test launch of a ground-to-ground medium long-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 at an undisclosed location. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIA KNS / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT   ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP.  /         (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Security Firms Tie WannaCry Ransomware to North Korea

But in the murky world of cyberspace, that doesn’t mean Pyongyang ordered the attack.

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.47.22 PM

Who Is Really to Blame for the WannaCry Ransomware?

Microsoft, the NSA, computer users, and the nature of computer science all bear a portion of the blame.

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 09:  Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, and Director of the National Security Agency, testifies during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing regarding the U.S. Cyber Command, on Capitol Hill May 9, 2017 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

NSA Director: Russia Hacked French ‘Infrastructure’ Ahead of Vote

Michael Rogers intensifies suspicions Moscow was behind the dump of Macron documents.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.