Health

An activist holds a placard during a protest against corruption outside the Zambian parliament in Lusaka on Sept. 28, 2018.

U.S. Ambassador Puts Zambia on Notice

Washington gives the country $500 million in support a year, he says, but has little to show for it in terms of cooperation and human rights.

A H7N9 bird flu patient is treated in a hospital in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province, on Feb 12, 2017.

The Real Reason to Panic About China’s Plague Outbreak

It’s not the disease that’s worrisome—it’s the Chinese government’s response to it.

Members of the German military wait to have their suits decontaminated after a search for dead birds in northern Germany, where swans infected with bird flu were found, on Feb. 22, 2006.

The Presidential Candidates Are Ignoring One of the World’s Biggest Looming Threats

Whoever sits in the White House come 2021 will likely have to confront a pandemic of some kind. He or she should start preparing now.

Young Indian women walk past a billboard in New Delhi encouraging the birth of girls on July 9, 2010.

A Generation of Girls Is Missing in India

Sex-selective abortion fuels a cycle of patriarchy and abuse.

Chinese line up in the pharmacy of Yueyang Hospital in Shanghai on Nov. 7, 2018.

Crowdfunding Can’t Cure China’s Health Care

Rural Chinese are turning to mutual aid apps—but the pool only goes so far.

A health worker waits to handle an unconfirmed Ebola patient at a newly built, Médecins Sans Frontières-supported Ebola treatment center in Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Nov. 7, 2018.

In Fragile States, Disease Outbreaks Don’t Stay Local for Long

U.S. health aid can also promote stability, mitigate extremism, and avoid costly longer-term military interventions.

Document of the Week: Is the U.N. Revisiting the Ban on Big Tobacco?

Outgoing U.N. official pleads a case for the tobacco industry, saying health expertise and cigarette jobs can contribute to global prosperity and improved understanding of health risks.

An elderly couple sit in Setenil de las Bodegas near Cádiz on Dec. 2, 2018, during Andalusia's regional election.

Spain’s Formula to Live Forever

The country is set to boast the world’s longest life expectancy by 2040. What are the Spanish doing right?

Women wear American flag headscarves at an event in New York City on Feb. 1, 2017.

Muslim Health Care for All

How religious communities in the United States are providing free health care and overcoming anti-immigrant sentiment.

A Burmese Rohingya girl gives a blood sample to test for malaria at a special clinic in Rakhine state on May 4, 2009.

Good Health Supports Good Governance

Trump’s budget reopens old—and unnecessary—arguments about the efficacy of health aid.

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres, U.S. President Donald Trump, and others wait for a meeting to begin at the U.N. headquarters in New York on Sept. 18, 2017. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

At the U.N., America Turns Back the Clock on Women’s Rights

Internal documents show how the U.S. works to stymie progress on women’s health, cultural issues, and climate change.

2018-books-lead

The Books We Read in 2018

Some of Foreign Policy’s favorite reads of the year.

In this photograph taken on August 22, 2017, doctors prepare instruments during a patient's plastic surgery procedure at Huamei Medical Cosmetology Hospital in Shanghai. (CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP/Getty Images)

Under the Knife in China

Lack of proper training leaves Chinese surgeons dangerously under-skilled.

Mozambican women and expecting mothers wait to receive medical care at the Murrupelane maternity ward in Nacala, Mozambique, on July 5. (Gianluigi Guercia/ AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Is Erasing Reproductive Rights at Home and Abroad

The removal of information from the State Department’s annual reports has grave consequences for human rights monitoring worldwide.

Pictures of the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize winners, Nadia Murad, a public advocate for the Yazidi community in Iraq and a survivor of sexual violence, and Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege, displayed in Oslo on Oct. 5. (Fredrik Hagen /AFP/Getty Images)

How Political Is This Year’s Nobel Peace Prize?

The Nobel committee is usually looking to make a statement. Is it trying to tell us something about #MeToo—maybe even Brett Kavanaugh?

Medical staff check each other's protective suits before entering the isolation unit at a hospital in Bundibugyo, western Uganda, during a suspected case of Ebola. Aug. 17. (Sumy Sadurni /AFP/Getty Images)

The Next Pandemic Will Be Arriving Shortly

Deadly diseases like Ebola and the avian flu are only one flight away. The U.S. government must start taking preparedness seriously.

A doctor examines the X-rays of a tuberculosis patient at a clinic in Brooklyn, New York, on Nov. 27, 2002. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images

You Can’t Treat Tuberculosis With Platitudes

Washington nearly killed the U.N. anti-TB effort, but it didn't need to. The U.N. will do that itself.

Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) questions witnesses during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on May 26, 2016. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

U.S. Lawmakers Press Pompeo to Fix Policy for Diplomat Families

The State Department has scaled back benefits to family members with special needs.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in Washington on July 25. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Pompeo Ignores Plea From Diplomats With Children With Special Needs

Families say the State Department continues to curb benefits mandated by law.

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

Who Will Care for the Carers?

As populations age, countries will need ever more primary health workers and aides — jobs robots will never do well. So why do we treat these workers so badly?