Hezbollah

Friends and family members of slain prominent Lebanese activist and intellectual Lokman Slim, attend a memorial ceremony in the garden of the family residence in the capital Beirut's southern suburbs, a week after he was found dead in his car, on Feb 11, 2021.

The Increasingly Violent Conflict Between Shiites and Iran’s Proxies

A killing in Lebanon is a symbol of a growing regional backlash against sectarian politics.

Members of the Shiite movement Hezbollah hold a military parade in the town of Riyaq in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley on Feb. 13, marking the annual anniversary of the group's so-called martyred leaders.

Hezbollah Is Vulnerable. Lokman Slim’s Assassination Proves It.

The Biden administration and the French government must draw clear red lines, or the group will escalate its campaign of terror.

A recent undated picture shows prominent Lebanese activist Lokman Slim, who was found dead in his car in southern Lebanon on Feb 4.

In Publisher’s Death, Lebanese See One More Unsolved Murder

Hezbollah suspected in the killing of Lokman Slim but accountability is unlikely.

People wave Syrian national flags and pictures of President Bashar al-Assad

U.S. Fears Syria’s Assad Meddling in Fragile Lebanon

A State Department assessment warned the Syrian regime is worsening Lebanon’s economic collapse.

A demonstrator holding a Lebanese flag

Our Top Weekend Reads

Why partition may be the only solution to Lebanon’s woes, what the bestselling book “Caste” ignores about India’s caste structure, and Britain’s distraction from its real economic problems.

A noose and gallows hang from the monument at Martyrs’ Square.

Partition Is the Only Solution to Lebanon’s Woes

Hezbollah’s dominance has deprived non-Shiite Lebanese of a voice in their own country. It is time to reconsider a century of consociational democracy and return to a form of federalism.

A protester wearing a scarf of the Shiite movement Hezbollah chants slogans while being flanked by Lebanese police during an anti-US demonstration near the United States' Embassy headquarters in Awkar, northeast of the capital Beirut on July 10, 2020.

Lebanon Is Paralyzed by Fear of Another Civil War

Sectarian tensions are nearing the boiling point—and what happens next is up to Hezbollah.

Coffins of three of the seven bodyguards of Lebanon's murdered prime minister Rafiq Hariri are carried through the crowd during a mass funeral in central Beirut  on 16 February 2005. Hariri and his bodyguards were buried after his coffin was caught in a crush of frenzied mourners outside a Beirut mosque. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH BARRAK.

Hezbollah Still Has a Knife at Lebanon’s Throat After Hariri Verdict

A confused tribunal process is a step toward justice in a case that has haunted the country for years.

A Lebanese father and his daughter light a candle outside the mansion of assassinated former Lebanese premier Rafik Hariri

A Verdict That Pleases No One in Lebanon

A U.N.-backed tribunal convicts one Hezbollah member in the Hariri murder but fails to determine who ordered it.

A picture taken on Aug. 9 shows graffiti on the wall of a bridge overlooking the port of Beirut, the site of the explosion which killed at least 154 people and devastated swathes of the capital.

Will Lebanon Rise From the Ashes?

After decades of living in denial, the country has hit rock bottom—but glimmers of a brighter future are starting to emerge.

A protester confronts security forces during an anti-government protest at Parliament on August 10 in Beirut, Lebanon.

Lebanon Needs Transformation, Not Another Corrupt Unity Government

If the United States lets France take the lead, the Lebanese people will get more political paralysis, cosmetic reforms, and Hezbollah control of state institutions.

Lebanese protesters clash with security forces in the vicinity of the Parliament in central Beirut on Aug. 10, following a huge chemical explosion days earlier that devastated large parts of the Lebanese capital.

Lebanon’s Government Has Resigned. That’s Not Nearly Enough.

The Lebanese public wants answers and accountability for last week’s port explosion—not scapegoats.

A general view of the scene of an explosion at the port of Lebanon's capital of Beirut.

Thousands Injured in Giant Beirut Blast

Lebanon’s government says “highly explosive materials” were stored near blast scene.

Lebanese riot police guard a bank in Beirut on April 28.

The United States Is Pushing Lebanon Further Into Iran’s Embrace

The Lebanese economy is collapsing, and the risk of conflict is rising—but Washington has failed to grasp why Iranian influence is spreading or the measures needed to stop it.

A picture taken during a guided tour organized by the Lebanese Shiite movement Hezbollah shows volunteers sorting food aid that will be distributed during the coronavirus pandemic in Beirut's southern suburbs on March 31. A poster on the wall shows the current leader of the movement, Hassan Nasrallah.

After the Coronavirus, Terrorism Won’t Be the Same

As big-government initiatives expand and leaders deflect blame, anti-establishment groups, angry Luddites, and China-haters could turn to violence.

A volunteer wearing a face mask with the colors and logo of the Hezbollah flag

Hezbollah Prepares for Its Next War: Against the Coronavirus

The militant group seeks to gain an edge on other parties in responding in Lebanon.

Anti-government protesters and riot police clash following the announcement of a new Lebanese government in Beirut on Jan. 22.

Lebanon’s Halloween Government

Protesters are right—the extent to which the country’s new cabinet brings it closer to Iran is spooky.

Supporters of Hezbollah hold placards calling for revenge for the killing of Qassem Suleimani in Beirut, Lebanon.

Iran’s Proxy Threat Is the Real Problem Now

Iran may call it a day after its token strike at U.S. forces in Iraq—but will its proxy forces?

Supporters of the Shiite Hezbollah movement hold a poster of slain Iraqi paramilitary chief Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis and Iranian Major General Qassem Suleimani and Hezbollah flags as the movement’s leader delivers a speech in Beirut on Jan. 5.

Hezbollah’s Moment of Truth

The group’s leader has promised bloody retribution for Suleimani’s death. In reality, he’ll probably have to focus on rebuilding Hezbollah’s standing.

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