Hezbollah

A picture taken during a guided tour organized by the Lebanese Shiite movement Hezbollah shows volunteers sorting food aid that will be distributed during the coronavirus pandemic in Beirut's southern suburbs on March 31. A poster on the wall shows the current leader of the movement, Hassan Nasrallah.

After the Coronavirus, Terrorism Won’t Be the Same

As big-government initiatives expand and leaders deflect blame, anti-establishment groups, angry Luddites, and China-haters could turn to violence.

A volunteer wearing a face mask with the colors and logo of the Hezbollah flag

Hezbollah Prepares for Its Next War: Against the Coronavirus

The militant group seeks to gain an edge on other parties in responding in Lebanon.

Anti-government protesters and riot police clash following the announcement of a new Lebanese government in Beirut on Jan. 22.

Lebanon’s Halloween Government

Protesters are right—the extent to which the country’s new cabinet brings it closer to Iran is spooky.

Supporters of Hezbollah hold placards calling for revenge for the killing of Qassem Suleimani in Beirut, Lebanon.

Iran’s Proxy Threat Is the Real Problem Now

Iran may call it a day after its token strike at U.S. forces in Iraq—but will its proxy forces?

Supporters of the Shiite Hezbollah movement hold a poster of slain Iraqi paramilitary chief Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis and Iranian Major General Qassem Suleimani and Hezbollah flags as the movement’s leader delivers a speech in Beirut on Jan. 5.

Hezbollah’s Moment of Truth

The group’s leader has promised bloody retribution for Suleimani’s death. In reality, he’ll probably have to focus on rebuilding Hezbollah’s standing.

A Lebanese anti-government demonstrator waves a stick while confronting supporters of the Shiite groups Hezbollah and Amal in Beirut on Nov. 25.

Untouchable No More: Hezbollah’s Fading Reputation

As Hezbollah sides with Lebanon's political elite, protesters in Beirut are increasingly willing to criticize it.

Protesters link arms to hold the line at a roadblock on the Ring Bridge in Beirut on Oct. 26.

To the Barricades in Beirut

Lebanese protesters are reappropriating roadblocks—long a mark of civil war-era division—as a symbol of unity.

A picture taken on a Lebanese Army-organized press tour shows Army commandos on the Lebanese-Syrian border on Aug. 28, 2017.

Washington Should Back, Not Punish, the Lebanese Military

With ongoing protests, potential sectarian clashes, and threats of terrorism in the region looming, the country’s armed forces need propping up now more than ever.

Supporters of Hassan Nasrallah, the head of Lebanon’s militant Shiite Muslim Hezbollah movement, watch him speak through a giant screen at a mosque in Beirut on Nov. 1.

Hezbollah’s Old Tricks Won’t Work in Lebanon

The Shiite group has to decide whether it is a resistance movement or part of the establishment.

An illustration including images of Saad Hariri, the Lebanese protestors, and the Lebanese flag.

Lebanon’s Protests Will Rage On

Despite Hariri’s resignation, public anger won’t be easy to soothe.

Lebanese security forces stand between supporters of the Shiite Hezbollah movement (foreground) and anti-government protesters (background) at Riad al-Solh Square in Beirut on Oct. 25.

Lebanon’s Protests Are Leaderless. That May Be Their Strength.

Fed up with decades of economic mismanagement and corruption, most demonstrators just want the government gone.

A group of Hezbollah infantry fighters take a break near the group's military base in Hermel, Lebanon, on Aug. 31

Hezbollah Readies for Next War Against Israel

Despite a pause in hostilities, militia fighters and experts believe the two sides could stumble into their first all-out conflict since 2006.

Supporters of Hezbollah fly the group’s flag during an event marking the 11th anniversary of the end of the 2006 war with Israel in the village of Khiam in southern Lebanon on Aug. 13, 2017.

Hezbollah’s Rainbow Coalition

The Shiite group is making inroads with other communities. Here’s how—and why.

Foreign Policy illustration/Getty Images

To Fight Terrorists, Follow the Money

Prosecuting money launderers is the best way to stamp out terrorism and corruption.

Fighters with the Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah party, carry flags as they parade in a southern suburb of the capital Beirut, to mark the al-Quds (Jerusalem) International Day, on May 31.

Hezbollah Isn’t Just in Beirut. It’s in New York, Too.

The trial of a senior operative reveals the extent of the terrorist organization’s reach in the United States and Canada.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally in the capital, Tehran, on May 10.

Trump’s Iran Crackdown Isn’t Enough to Stop Hezbollah

Unless Washington targets the group more effectively, it can outlive the pressure on Tehran.

Children of members of Lebanon's Shiite Hezbollah movement hold portraits of Hezbollah chief Hasan Nasrallah and Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei during a procession following the mourning period of Ashura in the southern Lebanese city of Nabatieh on Oct. 4, 2017.

Hezbollah Isn’t Iran’s Favorite Proxy Anymore

As tensions with Washington rise, Tehran has discovered the Lebanese militia isn’t up for doing its dirty work.

Supporters of Lebanon's Hezbollah group hold national, Palestinian, and the Shiite movement's yellow flags during a rally held in the Lebanese capital Beirut on Dec. 11, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Is Making Hezbollah Stronger

By threatening collective punishment over Lebanon’s most disruptive force, Washington is weakening the rest of its society.

Workers clean the beach of the coastal town of Zouk Mosbeh, north of Beirut, on Jan. 23, 2018, as garbage washed ashore after stormy weather. (Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Facing an Economic and Environmental Disaster

Rather than rushing to punish Hezbollah, the United States should be shoring up the country’s new government to avoid state collapse.

Police seize a hoard of cash in Salto del Guairá, Paraguay on Feb. 14, 2017. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

Paraguay Is a Fiscal Paradise for Terrorists

The South American country needs to do a better job patrolling its financial system—or face the consequences.