Human Rights in China

Political cartoonist Badiucao reveals his face in a self-portrait in April.

China’s Rebel Cartoonist Unmasks

Badiucao's work has brought him praise from critics — and threats from Beijing.

Photos gathered from social media and friends of the ethnic Kyrgyz students gone missing in China.

Kyrgyz Students Vanish Into Xinjiang’s Maw

Musicians, folklorists, and storytellers disappear after being forced back to China.

Quotes from the Quran decorate the walls outside the mosque in Mamichang village in Yunnan province, China, on Jan. 4. (Li Yuwei for Foreign Policy)

Love Allah, Love China

Chinese Muslims are struggling to follow their faith amid a growing crackdown.

Military cadets carry portraits of Sun Yat-sen, the founding father of the Republic of China, in Taipei, Taiwan, to mark National Day on Oct. 10, 2001. (Tao-Chuan Yeh/AFP/Getty Images)

The Chinese Communist Party Is Still Afraid of Sun Yat-Sen’s Shadow

A relentless war on free spaces for Chinese exiles stems from past revolutions.

Gulnur Kosgeulet shows a photo of her husband, Ekpor Sorsenbek, whom she believes is in a re-education camp in Xinjiang, in Almaty, Kazakhstan, on Jan. 21. (Reid Standish for Foreign Policy)

Kazakhs Won’t Be Silenced on China’s Internment Camps

Activists are speaking out for those imprisoned in Xinjiang—even if their own government doesn’t like it.

A family visits the National Stadium, also known as the “Bird's Nest,” constructed for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, on Dec. 26, 2018. (Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images)

Beijing’s Olympics Paved the Way for Xinjiang’s Camps

The 2008 games were supposed to help liberalize China. Instead the party learned it could get away with anything.

Sayragul Sauytbay sits inside a defendants' cage during a hearing at a court in Zharkent, Kazakhstan, on July 13, 2018. (Ruslan Pryanikov/AFP/Getty Images)

She Fled China’s Camps—but She’s Still Not Free

Sayragul Sauytbay, the only person to have worked inside an internment camp in Xinjiang and spoken publicly about it, now faces an uncertain future in Kazakhstan.

Mihrigul Tursun (right) speaks at the National Press Club in Washington on Nov. 26, 2018. Through a translator, Tursun, a member of China’s Uighur minority, said she spent several months in detention in China where she was beaten, tortured, and given unknown drugs. (Maria Danilova/AP)

The Chinese Communist Party Always Needs An Enemy

Xinjiang's detainees are the latest victims of a deep insecurity.

Former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig (left) and Canadian Michael Spavor. (AP)

Xi Jinping, Release These Men

The detention of Canadian citizens on spurious charges by Beijing sends a dangerous message.

Hanna Barczyk illustration for Foreign Policy

China’s #MeToo Activists Have Transformed a Generation

A small group of feminists has shifted attitudes—and prompted harsh pushback.

Chinese police patrol a night market near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar in China's Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region on June 25, 2017, a day before the Eid al-Fitr holiday. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

China Is Violating Uighurs’ Human Rights. The United States Must Act.

Much of the world has turned a blind eye to Beijing’s abuses. Washington cannot remain silent in the face of an elaborate campaign of repression and religious discrimination.

A Trump supporter holds up a sign during an  anti-sharia law rally organized by ACT for America on June 10 2017 in New York.
(KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

China’s Most Popular App Is Full of Hate

WeChat groups have become a major vector for anti-Muslim conspiracy theories.

(Foreign Policy illustration)

It’s Time to Get Loud About Academic Freedom in China

American schools should pull out of partnerships with schools that persecute students.

A Uighur man and his granddaughter are seen in their home after a meal during the Corban Festival, known to Muslims worldwide as Eid al-Adha or “feast of the sacrifice,” in China’s far western Xinjiang province on Sept. 12, 2016. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

China’s Nightmare Homestay

In Xinjiang, unwanted Chinese guests monitor Uighur homes 24/7.

A Chinese flag flies over a local mosque closed by authorities as an ethnic Uighur woman sells bread at her bakery in Kashgar, Xinjiang province, China, on June 28, 2017. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

China Has Chosen Cultural Genocide in Xinjiang—For Now

It’s expensive to destroy a people without killing them, but Beijing is willing to pay the price.

Liu Xia, the widow of Chinese Nobel dissident Liu Xiaobo, at the Helsinki International Airport on July 10. (Jussi Nukari/AFP/Getty Images)

Liu Xia’s Freedom Shows China Can Still Be Pressured

Even Beijing admitted the Nobel laureate's widow had committed no crime.

Joe Magee for Foreign Policy

In China’s Far West, Companies Cash in on Surveillance Program That Targets Muslims

The firms profiting from China's rights abuses are often backed by Western investors.

Dolkun Isa, the president of the World Uyghur Congress, in Tokyo on May 2, 2008. (Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Once Jailed Uighurs, Now Defends Them at U.N.

China tries to silence the group and lashes out at a U.S. diplomat.

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