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A sign for TotalEnergies EP Myanmar is seen behind a shuttered gate in Yangon, Myanmar, on Jan. 22.
A sign for TotalEnergies EP Myanmar is seen behind a shuttered gate in Yangon, Myanmar, on Jan. 22.

Companies Quitting Myanmar Provide Hollow Victories Against Junta

The departures of France’s TotalEnergies and Norway’s Telenor have left the military regime with more money and control.

Ex-combatants of the FARC-People’s Army listen to a U.N. member speak on humanitarian demining in the municipality of La Montañita, Caquetá, Colombia, on Oct. 9, 2019.
Ex-combatants of the FARC-People’s Army listen to a U.N. member speak on humanitarian demining in the municipality of La Montañita, Caquetá, Colombia, on Oct. 9, 2019.

The U.N.’s Small Success Stories

The organization has been criticized aplenty this week. Its missions in Colombia, Honduras, and Venezuela could be a silver lining.

Cases of bottled water are handed out in Mississippi.
Cases of bottled water are handed out in Mississippi.

Biden Should Embrace the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals

Many of his domestic policy priorities align with the global campaign.

A member of the Zimbabwe Republic Police is seen in front of an electoral poster of President Emmerson Mnangagwa
A member of the Zimbabwe Republic Police is seen in front of an electoral poster of President Emmerson Mnangagwa

Cafe Meeting Turns Into Tense Car Chase for U.S. Senate Aides in Zimbabwe

Leading lawmaker calls on Biden to address Zimbabwe’s “dire” authoritarian turn after the incident.

A silhouette of diplomats meeting in Belgrade on Dec. 3, 2015.
A silhouette of diplomats meeting in Belgrade on Dec. 3, 2015.

The U.N. Gave a Quiet Diplomat the Wrong Job

Volker Türk lacks the temperament to be the United Nations human rights chief.

Gambian President Adama Barrow signs the condolence book for the late Queen Elizabeth II at the British ambassador’s residence in Banjul, Gambia, on Sept. 12.
Gambian President Adama Barrow signs the condolence book for the late Queen Elizabeth II at the British ambassador’s residence in Banjul, Gambia, on Sept. 12.

King Charles III Faces a Reckoning on Empire in Africa

Will a monarch known for voicing his personal views apologize for Britain’s crimes in Africa?

A migrant family from Venezuela illegally crosses the Rio Grande river.
A migrant family from Venezuela illegally crosses the Rio Grande river.

Venezuela’s Forgotten Refugee Crisis Rivals Ukraine’s

International funding for refugees falls short despite a new spike in Venezuelans fleeing their country.

An illustration of the fall of Kabul and the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.
An illustration of the fall of Kabul and the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

How America Sealed Afghanistan’s Fate—Again

Two recent books chronicle how the United States turned its back on Afghanistan and pitched the country into chaos.

Nigerian soldiers load a military truck with weapons recovered from bandits in north-central Nigeria on April 21.
Nigerian soldiers load a military truck with weapons recovered from bandits in north-central Nigeria on April 21.

More Weapons Won’t Solve Nigeria’s Security Crisis

A nearly $1 billion U.S. arms sale to the country will promote further violence.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Congolese Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula give a press conference at Cité de l’OUA (Organisation of African Unity) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 9.
U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Congolese Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula give a press conference at Cité de l’OUA (Organisation of African Unity) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 9.

Can Blinken Bring Peace in Eastern Congo?

The U.S. secretary of state is urging Kigali, Kinshasa, and others to stop backing militias in the region—but a lasting peace deal remains elusive.

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein
Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein
Graduates from the Indian Army’s Jammu and Kashmir Light Infantry Regiment take part in a parade in Srinagar on Dec. 8, 2018.
Graduates from the Indian Army’s Jammu and Kashmir Light Infantry Regiment take part in a parade in Srinagar on Dec. 8, 2018.

It’s Time to Condition Aid to India

The country’s military violates human rights with impunity—and gets a pass in Washington.

Afghan women hold placards as they march and shout slogans such as "Bread, work, freedom" during a women's rights protest in Kabul on Aug. 13.
Afghan women hold placards as they march and shout slogans such as "Bread, work, freedom" during a women's rights protest in Kabul on Aug. 13.

Taliban Mark a ‘Black Day’ for Afghanistan With More Violence Against Women

A year after the Taliban takeover, women took to the streets defiantly to demand bread, work, and freedom.

U.S. President Joe Biden and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on July 16.
U.S. President Joe Biden and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on July 16.

The Old Human Rights Playbook Won’t Work Anymore

As Biden’s Saudi visit showed, state-to-state shaming isn’t the only way to shift the calculus of authoritarian rulers who abuse their citizens.

bakla-philippines-tagalog-decoder-queer-ari liloan-illustration
bakla-philippines-tagalog-decoder-queer-ari liloan-illustration

How ‘Bakla’ Explains the Struggle for Queer Identity in the Philippines

The Tagalog word eludes Western concepts of gender and sexuality—and offers a window into LGBTQ+ Filipinos’ quest for acceptance.

Women wearing burqas in Kabul
Women wearing burqas in Kabul

Afghan Women Are Worse Off Than Ever

A new Amnesty report lays out the Taliban playbook for erasing half the population: electrocutions, beatings, detentions, and disappearances.

A woman sitting inside a bus kisses a man who is standing outside the bus and leaning in the door to kiss her.
A woman sitting inside a bus kisses a man who is standing outside the bus and leaning in the door to kiss her.

Civilian Men Are Trapped in Ukraine

Human rights and humanitarian NGOs should pay attention to Kyiv’s sex-selective martial law.

Turkish writer Hatice Cengiz, fiancée of Saudi journalist and dissident Jamal Khashoggi, poses next to a portrait of Khashoggi after unveiling it on the National Mall in Washington on Oct. 1, 2021, during a memorial ceremony marking the third anniversary of his assassination at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.
Turkish writer Hatice Cengiz, fiancée of Saudi journalist and dissident Jamal Khashoggi, poses next to a portrait of Khashoggi after unveiling it on the National Mall in Washington on Oct. 1, 2021, during a memorial ceremony marking the third anniversary of his assassination at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

It’s Time to Rethink the U.S.-Saudi Relationship

For too long, Washington has sacrificed its principles to appease the kingdom—and gotten almost nothing in return.

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