Human Rights

Serikzhan Bilash, the head of Atajurt Eriktileri, holds up a photo during a press conference in Almaty, Kazakhstan, on Jan. 21. (Reid Standish for Foreign Policy)

Astana Tries to Silence China Critics

Head of watchdog organization detained for work on Xinjiang camps.

Algerians chant slogans and wave national flags during a rally against ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's bid for a fifth term in the capital Algiers on March 1. (Ryad Kramdi/AFP/Getty Images)

The Arab Spring Is Not Over Yet

Major protests in Algeria and Sudan show that the spirit of 2011 lives on.

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet attends the opening day of the 39th session of the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva on Sept. 10, 2018. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Sought to Derail Michelle Bachelet’s Bid for Top U.N. Human Rights Job

The Trump administration was troubled by her views on abortion, Israel, and Latin America.

A Chinese police officer takes his position by the road near what is officially called a “vocational education and training program” in Yining, in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Detainees Are Trickling Out of Xinjiang’s Camps

House arrest or forced labor awaits most of those released so far in what may be a public relations ploy.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

A Moroccan draped in the Berber, or Amazigh, flag shouts slogans while marching during a protest against the jailing of Al-Hirak or "Popular Movement" activists in the capital Rabat on July 15, 2018.

Morocco’s Crackdown Won’t Silence Dissent

Across the country, protesters are increasingly willing to criticize the government and the monarchy—even in the face of repression.

People celebrate the results of the Irish referendum to overturn the country’s abortion ban in Dublin on May 26, 2018. (Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

A Jury of Peers

How Ireland used a Citizens’ Assembly to solve some of its toughest problems.

A protester holds a placard with the image of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a demonstration outside the Saudi Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Oct. 25, 2018. (Lakruwan  Wanniarachichi/AFP/Getty Images)

Getting Away With Murder

Why the campaign to hold Saudi Arabia accountable for Jamal Khashoggi’s killing is losing steam.

(Etienne Oliveau/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Beijing’s Big, Bad Year

Five Reads: The best Foreign Policy stories of 2018 on China.

Chinese photographer Lu Guang attends the Pingyao International Photography Festival in Pingyao, in Shanxi province, China, on Sept. 20, 2014. (Reuters)

China’s Khashoggi Can Still Be Saved

Photojournalist Lu Guang has fallen victim to an old vendetta in his homeland.

U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Dec. 13. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Neither Side Gets the Khashoggi Debate Right

The tribalism infecting U.S. domestic politics has unfortunately crept deep into the foreign-policy discourse.

Posters depicting slain Honduran environmentalist Berta Cáceres are carried during an International Women's day demonstration in Tegucigalpa on March 8, 2016. (Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images)

Honduran Activist’s Murder Trial Addresses Symptoms, Not Causes, of Violence

Seven men were convicted in the 2016 killing of environmental activist Berta Cáceres, but real accountability—and remedies for the corruption and insecurity plaguing Honduras—lag far behind.

Chinese police patrol a night market near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar in China's Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region on June 25, 2017, a day before the Eid al-Fitr holiday. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

China Is Violating Uighurs’ Human Rights. The United States Must Act.

Much of the world has turned a blind eye to Beijing’s abuses. Washington cannot remain silent in the face of an elaborate campaign of repression and religious discrimination.

A road sign points towards an Airbnb apartment, located in the Esh Kodesh outpost, near the Jewish settlement of Shilo and the Palestinian village of Qusra in the West Bank on November 20, 2018.

If the U.S. Government Won’t Act, Airbnb Will

While the White House rubber-stamps Benjamin Netanyahu’s every move, the online rental company is cracking down on Israel’s illegal settlements.

Cumhuriyet editor in chief Can Dundar speaks to media as he arrives at a courthouse for trial in Istanbul on April 1, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

‘To Be a Journalist in Turkey Means You’re Ready to Sacrifice Everything’

On the podcast: the price one Turkish newspaper editor is paying for angering President Erdogan.

Then-U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Tom Malinowski speaks at the State Department in Washington on April 13, 2016. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A Human Rights Champion Comes to the House

Congressman-elect Tom Malinowski says he hopes his diplomatic credentials can help Democrats push back on Trump.

(Foreign Policy illustration)

It’s Time to Get Loud About Academic Freedom in China

American schools should pull out of partnerships with schools that persecute students.

A woman holds white balloons during a demonstration to demand the endorsement of the peace agreement between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia in Bogota on Nov. 30. (Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Are the Key to Peace

Cease-fire negotiations that exclude them are more likely to fall apart. Here’s how the U.N. can boost their participation at the bargaining table.

A Yemeni child inspects the rubble of a house in Yemen's rebel-held capital Sanaa on August 11, 2016, after it was reportedly hit by a Saudi-led coalition air strike.

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates Are Starving Yemenis to Death

The world was rightly outraged by the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, but the bombs of Mohammed bin Salman and his Emirati allies are killing dozens each day in Yemen.

Sri Lanka’s newly appointed prime minister, Mahinda Rajapaksa (center), signs a document during a ceremony to assume duties at the prime minister’s office in Colombo on Oct. 29. (Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images)

Halfway Isn’t Good Enough on Human Rights

Myanmar and Sri Lanka were praised for minimal progress. Now it’s all falling apart.

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