Human Rights

Callixte Mbarushimana during a hearing at The Hague’s International Criminal Court on Sept. 15, 2011.

The Alleged War Criminal in the U.N.’s Midst

Twenty-five years after the Rwandan genocide, will the U.N. at last pursue one of its own former officials?

A peatland forest burns to make way for a palm oil plantation on Nov. 1, 2015, on the outskirts of Palangkaraya, in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Whoever Wins Indonesia’s Presidential Election, Indigenous People Will Lose

Millions of Indonesians lack basic protections. The presidential contenders don’t seem to care.

A boy wearing a blue mask with tears of blood participates in a protest march demanding the European Union take action against China in support of the Uighurs, in Brussels, on April 27, 2018. (Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing China Sanctions

Mass detention of Uighurs has been superseded by trade talks, say rights advocates.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi participates in a G-20 Africa conference in Berlin on June 12, 2017. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Lawmakers Warn Egyptian Leader Over Human Rights Abuses

A bipartisan group of lawmakers sent a letter directly to Sisi that appeared to suggest security assistance could be in jeopardy.

A polling station in Cairo's western Giza district on March 25, 2018, ahead of the vote scheduled to begin the following day, decorated with electoral posters depicting President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. (Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images)

Egypt’s Prisons Are Becoming Recruiting Grounds for the Islamic State

Abuse behind bars and a record high rate of detainment are a recipe for disaster.

Donald Trump listens while Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi makes a statement to the press in the Oval Office before a meeting on April 3, 2017 in Washington. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Sisi Has His Own Jamal Khashoggi

It’s time to hold Egypt accountable for the U.S. citizens it has unjustly victimized.

Kelley Currie, the U.S. representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Council, attends a U.N. Security Council meeting in New York City on April 5, 2018. (Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

High-Wire Act Ahead for Trump’s New Women’s Rights Envoy

Tough but torn, Kelley Eckels Currie must find a way to balance her loyalties.

Serikzhan Bilash, the head of Atajurt Eriktileri, holds up a photo during a press conference in Almaty, Kazakhstan, on Jan. 21. (Reid Standish for Foreign Policy)

Astana Tries to Silence China Critics

Head of watchdog organization detained for work on Xinjiang camps.

Algerians chant slogans and wave national flags during a rally against ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's bid for a fifth term in the capital Algiers on March 1. (Ryad Kramdi/AFP/Getty Images)

The Arab Spring Is Not Over Yet

Major protests in Algeria and Sudan show that the spirit of 2011 lives on.

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet attends the opening day of the 39th session of the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva on Sept. 10, 2018. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Sought to Derail Michelle Bachelet’s Bid for Top U.N. Human Rights Job

The Trump administration was troubled by her views on abortion, Israel, and Latin America.

A Chinese police officer takes his position by the road near what is officially called a “vocational education and training program” in Yining, in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Detainees Are Trickling Out of Xinjiang’s Camps

House arrest or forced labor awaits most of those released so far in what may be a public relations ploy.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

A Moroccan draped in the Berber, or Amazigh, flag shouts slogans while marching during a protest against the jailing of Al-Hirak or "Popular Movement" activists in the capital Rabat on July 15, 2018.

Morocco’s Crackdown Won’t Silence Dissent

Across the country, protesters are increasingly willing to criticize the government and the monarchy—even in the face of repression.

People celebrate the results of the Irish referendum to overturn the country’s abortion ban in Dublin on May 26, 2018. (Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

A Jury of Peers

How Ireland used a Citizens’ Assembly to solve some of its toughest problems.

A protester holds a placard with the image of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a demonstration outside the Saudi Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Oct. 25, 2018. (Lakruwan  Wanniarachichi/AFP/Getty Images)

Getting Away With Murder

Why the campaign to hold Saudi Arabia accountable for Jamal Khashoggi’s killing is losing steam.

(Etienne Oliveau/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Beijing’s Big, Bad Year

Five Reads: The best Foreign Policy stories of 2018 on China.

Chinese photographer Lu Guang attends the Pingyao International Photography Festival in Pingyao, in Shanxi province, China, on Sept. 20, 2014. (Reuters)

China’s Khashoggi Can Still Be Saved

Photojournalist Lu Guang has fallen victim to an old vendetta in his homeland.

U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Dec. 13. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Neither Side Gets the Khashoggi Debate Right

The tribalism infecting U.S. domestic politics has unfortunately crept deep into the foreign-policy discourse.

Posters depicting slain Honduran environmentalist Berta Cáceres are carried during an International Women's day demonstration in Tegucigalpa on March 8, 2016. (Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images)

Honduran Activist’s Murder Trial Addresses Symptoms, Not Causes, of Violence

Seven men were convicted in the 2016 killing of environmental activist Berta Cáceres, but real accountability—and remedies for the corruption and insecurity plaguing Honduras—lag far behind.

Chinese police patrol a night market near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar in China's Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region on June 25, 2017, a day before the Eid al-Fitr holiday. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

China Is Violating Uighurs’ Human Rights. The United States Must Act.

Much of the world has turned a blind eye to Beijing’s abuses. Washington cannot remain silent in the face of an elaborate campaign of repression and religious discrimination.

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