Hungary

Several hundred Austrian police and soldiers simulate a border control exercise on June 26, 2018 at the crossing point with Slovenia, where thousands of migrants crossed in 2015.

A New, Harsher Vision of the EU Takes Shape

Populists still want to be part of the European Union, even in Hungary and Poland. Just a far less inclusive one.

Aung San Suu Kyi with Viktor Orban in Budapest on June 5.

Orban and Aung San Suu Kyi Gave in to Hate the Same Way

The two Oxford-educated leaders once preached liberal values—but found bigotry more convenient.

Police officers charge toward protesters during a demonstration on June 12 in Hong Kong.

What’s Next for Hong Kong?

Plus: U.S. lawmakers push back against Saudi arms sales, Shinzo Abe visits Iran, and the other stories we're following today.

Senior advisor Jared Kushner poses for a selfie in the White House Rose on May 16.

Kushner’s Middle East Peace Plan Goes on Tour

Plus: Macron and Merkel remain divided over EU leadership, and the other stories we're following today.

Iranian demonstrators raise placards as they chant anti-US slogans during a rally in Tehran on May 10.

Iran’s Rhetoric Heats Up

Iran responds to U.S. military presence in the Gulf, China and the United States reach a deadlock in the trade war, and what to watch in the world this week.

U.S. President Donald Trump stands in front of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban during a NATO family picture in Brussels on May 25, 2017.

Trump Is Letting Orban Walk All Over the United States

It is time to protect U.S. interests by avoiding deals with Hungary.

A man closes a voting station in Kinshasa ahead of counting the ballots after presidential elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on Dec. 30, 2018.

No Democracy Is an Island

If Washington thinks that affirming flawed votes and the leaders who benefited from them abroad isn’t harming the health of democracy at home, it is mistaken.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks during a press conference on May 03, in Caracas, Venezuela.

 The World This Weekend

Venezuela’s political crisis continues to evolve, and protests persist in Sudan.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban speaks to Chinese President Xi Jinping during a bilateral meeting of the Second Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on April 25.

To Counter China and Russia, U.S. Mulls Inviting Hungary’s Orban to D.C.

Team Trump is trying to pull Hungary back from its cozy relationship with Moscow and Beijing. But it comes at a cost, critics say.

Serbian Prime Minister Ivica Dacic, Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban shake hands at a summit of 16 Central and Eastern European leaders looking to woo Chinese investment in Bucharest on Nov. 25, 2013. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images)

How China Blew Its Chance in Eastern Europe

Seven years on, the 16+1 project has largely flopped.

Presidential candidate Zuzana Caputova (C) waits for the first exit polls at her election headquarters during the first round of the presidential elections in Bratislava, Slovakia, on March 16, 2019.

Can Zuzana Caputova Save Slovakia?

A political newcomer is poised to become president by standing up for liberal democratic values—and seeking to halt the spread of right-wing populism across Central and Eastern Europe.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (center) and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban  (left) in the Raoul Wallenberg memorial garden of Budapest synagogue in Budapest on July 19, 2017. (Peter Kohalmi/AFP/Getty Images)

Why Benjamin Netanyahu Loves the European Far-Right

Recent spats aside, Israel’s right-wing government sees the illiberal nationalist leaders of Poland and Hungary as natural allies. They share a hostility toward human rights, Enlightenment values, and the European Union.

U.S. President Donald Trump (left) and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban stand at a NATO summit in Brussels on May 25, 2017.  (Danny Gys/AFP/Getty Images)

When European Countries Retreat From Democracy, How Should the U.S. Respond?

The question looms large during Pompeo’s visit to Central Europe.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban shake hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu  at the prime minister's office in Jerusalem, Israel, July 19, 2018.

Theodor Herzl Was Willing to Tolerate Europe’s Far-Right. Should Israel’s Leaders Do the Same?

Shunning populist parties won’t make Jews safer. Engaging with them is a matter of realpolitik, and Israel should focus on contemporary threats, not those of the past.

Protesters demonstrating against the right-wing government of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban hold a rally in Budapest, Hungary, on April 14, 2018. Demonstrators demanded a free press and independent public media and new laws to ensure fair elections. (Laszlo Balogh/Getty Images)

Budapest Blues

On the podcast: What it’s like to be a journalist in Orban’s Hungary.

Vice-chairman of the Momentum party Anna Donath at a protest in downtown Budapest on Dec. 16, 2018. (Peter Kohalmi/AFP/Getty Images)

Hungary Finally Has an Opposition Worth a Damn

The country’s youngest party has united the left and right against Viktor Orban.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban (left) and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands after making a joint statement in Jerusalem on July 19, 2018. (Debbie Hill/AFP/Getty Images)

Nationalists of the World, Unite!

Yoram Hazony's work provides a global scaffolding for the new far-right.

President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses the press during the Argentina G20 Leaders' Summit 2018 on Dec. 1 in Buenos Aires. (Daniel Jayo/Getty Images)

Erdogan’s Anti-Semitism Will Sink Turkey’s Economy

The Turkish president’s racist conspiracy theories are a threat to economic stability.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump prior to the president's departure from Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv on May 23, 2017.

Trump First, Jews Later

Israeli government officials are helping to normalize the violent anti-Semitism of the Christian right.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.