Hungary

Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki shakes hands with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban during a meeting at the Palace on the Isle in Warsaw's Lazienki Park on May 14, 2018.

Why Populists Understand Eastern Europe

Liberals have changed the region for the better—but don’t perceive its sense of loss.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban (center) votes with other representatives in the Hungarian parliament in Budapest on March 30.

Viktor Orban Can’t Eradicate the Coronavirus by Decree

Hungary’s authoritarian leader has granted himself dictatorial powers, but his neglect of the country’s health system and his powerlessness in the face of a depreciating currency will come back to haunt him.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban delivers his annual state of the nation speech in front of Fidesz party members.

Nationalists Claim They Want to Redefine Conservatism, but They’re Not Sure What It Is

A February gathering in Rome outlined a muddled vision for the future, claiming the mantle of Ronald Reagan and St. John Paul II while indulging the far-right.

Stock trader Peter Tuchman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Market response to the coronavirus, China deflecting blame, and the dawn of post-democratic Europe.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi are greeted by South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa

Coronavirus Has Started a Censorship Pandemic

Governments around the world are banning fake news about the crisis—and cracking down on their critics while they’re at it.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban delivers his state of the nation address in Budapest on Feb. 18, 2018.

The Shocking ‘Coronavirus Coup’ in Hungary Was a Wake-Up Call

While the world is shut down, history hasn’t stopped. Authoritarians are seizing the opportunity.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen welcomes Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban

Coronavirus and the Dawn of Post-Democratic Europe

Hungary has used the pandemic to abandon its last vestiges of democracy—and to dare the EU to do anything about it.

Gergely Karacsony addresses an audience in Budapest, Hungary, after his victory in the capital city's mayoral election.

Europe’s Populist Governments Have a Problem: Their Capitals

City-level opposition could be the key to defeating populism in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and beyond.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban during a meeting in the White House Oval Office in Washington on May 13.

Did Hungary’s Viktor Orban Turn Trump Against Ukraine?

Why Hungary and Russia might have wanted to shape the U.S. president’s views on Ukraine.

European flags wave in front of the Berlaymont building in Brussels on Jan. 14. (Michele Spatari/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

For Eastern Europe, Brussels Is the New Moscow

After upcoming elections in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Romania, healing Europe’s east-west divide will be more urgent than ever.

Participants seen holding flags during the National Rosary

Why Poland’s Populists Keep Winning

PiS won by offering provincial voters social benefits that transformed their lives. If Poland’s opposition wants to defeat the illiberal ruling party, it will have to offer an alternative welfare state model.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (C), Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen (L) attend a cabinet retreat on November 14, 2018 in Potsdam, Germany.

Ursula von der Leyen Isn’t Perfect, but She’s Better Than the Alternative

Opposing the compromise candidate for EU commission president will further empower populists and Euroskeptics.

Member of the European Parliament Nigel Farage (L) speaks with European Commission First Vice-President Frans Timmermans (R) prior to a debate concerning Hungary's situation during a plenary session at the European Parliament on September 11, 2018 in Strasbourg, France.

Europe Must Not Allow Enemies of Democracy to Choose the Next EU Commissioner

The illiberal leaders of Hungary and Poland falsely claim Frans Timmermans would divide Europe. What they really fear is his commitment to the rule of law.

Several hundred Austrian police and soldiers simulate a border control exercise on June 26, 2018 at the crossing point with Slovenia, where thousands of migrants crossed in 2015.

A New, Harsher Vision of the EU Takes Shape

Populists still want to be part of the European Union, even in Hungary and Poland. Just a far less inclusive one.

Aung San Suu Kyi with Viktor Orban in Budapest on June 5.

Orban and Aung San Suu Kyi Gave in to Hate the Same Way

The two Oxford-educated leaders once preached liberal values—but found bigotry more convenient.

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