ICC

Sudanese protesters arrive to the town of Atbara from Khartoum on Dec. 19, 2019, to mark the first anniversary of the beginning of the uprising that toppled former President Omar al-Bashir.

Sudan Is Remaking Its Relationship With the Rest of the World

From meeting with Netanyahu to working with the ICC, the new government is reversing the foreign policy of the Bashir era.

Omar al-Bashir

Will Sudan’s Bashir Be Handed to the ICC at Last?

In a surprise move, Sudan indicated it might turn over former autocrat Omar al-Bashir to the International Criminal Court, which he flouted for so many years, over Darfur.

International Criminal Court Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda (R) speaks with a colleague during the closing statements of the trial of former Congolese warlord Bosco Ntaganda in The Hague on Aug. 28, 2018.

Don’t Give Up on the ICC

The International Criminal Court has many flaws, but abandoning it now would give free rein to war criminals and open the door to impunity.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

A health worker shouts slogans demanding fair and higher wages during a protest of the lack of medical supplies and poor conditions in hospitals, in front of a line of police  in Caracas on Aug. 16. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Ramps Up Pressure on Venezuela, But Maduro Keeps Hanging On

The United States has announced new sanctions on Venezuela and may threaten further action—but there’s little sign that will bring the regime down anytime soon.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 25. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Trump Takes Aim at Iran, China, and the Global System in Big U.N. Speech

And draws a rare laugh from world leaders while boasting of his accomplishments.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton addresses the Federalist Society in Washington on Sept. 10. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

John Bolton’s Obsession With the International Criminal Court Is Outdated

If Trump’s advisors are all off giving irrelevant speeches on old preoccupations, who is minding the president?

Sisal Creative illustration for Foreign Policy; Sean Money and Elizabeth Fay for Foreign Policy

The End of Human Rights?

Learning from the failure of the Responsibility to Protect and the International Criminal Court.

Members of the Yazidi minority search for clues on February 3, 2015, that might lead them to missing relatives in the remains of people killed by the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group, a day after Kurdish forces discovered a mass grave near the Iraqi village of Sinuni, in the northwestern Sinjar area. A peshmerga lieutenant colonel said the grave containing the remains of about 25 people was found during a search for explosives that IS often leaves behind, posing a threat to security forces and civilians even after they withdraw. AFP PHOTO / SAFIN HAMED        (Photo credit should read SAFIN HAMED/AFP/Getty Images)

The Battle to Unearth Iraq’s Mass Graves

Thousands of Yazidis slaughtered by the Islamic State are awaiting exhumation. But a row between Baghdad and Erbil has left them in the ground for more than a year.

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South African Court Tells Government It Can’t Withdraw From the ICC

In yet another blow to South African President Jacob Zuma’s government.

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Why Russia Just Withdrew from the ICC

The ICC has had a rough year, and Russia just made things worse.

<> on July 3, 2009 in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Exclusive: International Criminal Court Poised to Open Investigation into War Crimes in Afghanistan

The investigation could expose U.S. personnel to international justice inquiry for the first time.

Members of Burundi's National Assembly raise their arm to vote on October 12, 2016 in Bujumbura, for the withdrawal of the International Criminal Court (ICC) from the capital, after the UN began an enquiry into human rights abuses in the turbulent nation.
The draft law was passed with 94 votes in favour, two against and 14 abstentions. It will next go to the Senate -- also dominated by the ruling party -- before being approved by President Pierre Nkurunziza. In April, ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said she was conducting a "preliminary examination" of the situation in Burundi -- the first step towards a full investigation and possible prosecutions -- looking into allegations including murder, torture, rape and forced disappearances. / AFP / ONESPHORE NIBIGIRA        (Photo credit should read ONESPHORE NIBIGIRA/AFP/Getty Images)

Is the International Criminal Court Crumbling Before Our Eyes?

With three African countries giving notice that they intend to abandon the ICC, a coordinated exodus might soon be coming.

Den Haag, NETHERLANDS:  People enter the International Criminal Court, 20 June 2006 in the Hague. Former Liberian president Charles Taylor was today en route to the Netherlands for trial for war crimes. Taylor will be kept in the same jail that held Yugoslav ex-president Slobodan Milosevic. Taylor faces 11 charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity arising from the decade-long civil war in neighbouring Sierra Leone. As soon as he arrives, the former President will be transferred to the detention unit of the International Criminal Court (ICC) which shares a prison with the UN court which tried Milosevic, known as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). AFP PHOTO ANP JUAN VRIJDAG   ** NETHERLANDS OUT **  (Photo credit should read JUAN VRIJDAG/AFP/Getty Images)

Burundi Promised More Countries Would Withdraw from the ICC. Now South Africa Has.

Now that Burundi and South Africa have moved to leave the ICC, more African countries are expected to follow.

Members of Burundi's National Assembly raise their arm to vote on October 12, 2016 in Bujumbura, for the withdrawal of the International Criminal Court (ICC) from the capital, after the UN began an enquiry into human rights abuses in the turbulent nation.
The draft law was passed with 94 votes in favour, two against and 14 abstentions. It will next go to the Senate -- also dominated by the ruling party -- before being approved by President Pierre Nkurunziza. In April, ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said she was conducting a "preliminary examination" of the situation in Burundi -- the first step towards a full investigation and possible prosecutions -- looking into allegations including murder, torture, rape and forced disappearances. / AFP / ONESPHORE NIBIGIRA        (Photo credit should read c)

Washington Is Unhappy That Burundi Is ‘Very Happy’ to Be Leaving the ICC

The Burundian government wants to leave the International Criminal Court. They're well on their way.

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Teenager Arrested for Making a Clock Now Being Trolled for Visiting the White House

Sen. Ted Cruz and Twitter trolls aren't happy about Ahmed Mohamed, the Muslim teenager arrested for bringing a homemade clock to school, visiting the White House.

Sudanese President and candidate in the presidential elections Omar al-Bashir (C) casts his vote at a polling station in the Saint Francis school in the capital, Khartoum, on April 13, 2015. With 15 little-known candidates running against him, 71-year-old Bashir faces no real competition in the second contested vote since he seized power in 1989.  AFP PHOTO / ASHRAF SHAZLY        (Photo credit should read ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)

Omar al-Bashir Just Made a Mockery of International Justice. Again.

South Africa just let the dictator of Sudan fly home — that's bad news for the International Criminal Court.

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