Indonesia

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani gives a press conference in Tehran on June 12.

Iran Pushes Uranium Limit

Plus: North Korea and the U.S. talk about a third summit, political maneuvering heats up in Israel, and the other stories we’re following today.

Conservative MP Boris Johnson leaves his home in London on June 13.

Here Comes Boris

Plus: Egypt’s Mohamed Morsi dies in court, the United States sends more troops to the Middle East, and the other stories we’re following today.

Matteo Salvini, leader of the Italian Lega party, delivers a speech during a nationalist rally on May 18, ahead of EU Parliament elections.

Europe Votes

Plus: Election results expected in India, protests in Indonesia, and the other stories we're following today.

A settlement is seen against the skyline of Manila’s financial district in the Philippines on Aug. 17, 2017.

For the Poor, Falling Poverty Numbers Aren’t Always Good News

Chronic poverty may be on the decline, but too many families still face cyclical poverty.

A section of newly constructed offshore seawall on April 27, 2017 in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Indonesia Floats Yet Another Plan to Move Its Sinking Capital

Big plans to relocate from Jakarta keep disappearing into nothing. Will this time be different?

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the US Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Disinformation Is Drowning Democracy

In the new age of lies, law, not tech, is the answer.

Indonesian workers transport ballot boxes for the upcoming general elections at the Bonto Matinggi village in Maros, South Sulawesi, on April 16. (Daeng Mansur/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

In recent days, Washington raced to decipher the Mueller report and Indonesian voters cast ballots at more than 800,000 polling stations.

Indonesian incumbent Presidential candidate Joko Widodo and his vice presidential candidate Maruf Amin (R), wave during a press conference after the general election on April 17, 2019 in Jakarta, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Islam Is the Winning Ticket in Indonesia

Politics has turned religious in the world's biggest Muslim nation — but that's part of democracy too.

A peatland forest burns to make way for a palm oil plantation on Nov. 1, 2015, on the outskirts of Palangkaraya, in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Whoever Wins Indonesia’s Presidential Election, Indigenous People Will Lose

Millions of Indonesians lack basic protections. The presidential contenders don’t seem to care.

An Indonesian election commission worker arranges ballot boxes in preparation for the upcoming presidential and parliamentary elections in Surabaya on March 18. (Juni Kriswanto/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s at Stake in Indonesia’s Elections?

The world’s third-largest democracy goes to the polls.

A youth sleeps beside a campaign banner as people gather for an election campaign rally for Indonesian presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto and his running mate Sandiaga Uno outside the Gelora Bung Karno stadium in Jakarta on April 7, 2019. (Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Indonesians Fight for Their Right to Not Vote

It's an act of protest—but the government calls it terrorism.

A man carries a piece of the  Lion Air flight JT 610 wreckage which is being moved to another location for further investigation at the Tanjung Priok port on November 2, 2018 in Jakarta, Indonesia..  (Photo by Ed Wray/Getty Images)

Asia’s Airlines Are on Course for More Disasters

Cheap flights are pushing the limits of regulation .

Acehnese Muslims demonstrate against China’s oppression of ethnic Uighurs at Baiturrahman Mosque in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, on Dec. 21, 2018. (Riau Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Indonesia’s Opposition Takes Up the Uighur Cause

China's internment camps for Muslims have become a political talking point.

Chinese police patrol a night market near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar in China's Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region on June 25, 2017, a day before the Eid al-Fitr holiday. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

China Is Violating Uighurs’ Human Rights. The United States Must Act.

Much of the world has turned a blind eye to Beijing’s abuses. Washington cannot remain silent in the face of an elaborate campaign of repression and religious discrimination.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Children read the Quran at a temporary shelter after the tsunami and earthquake in Palu, Indonesia, on Oct. 9. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Indonesia’s Indigenous Languages Hold the Secrets of Surviving Disaster

Introducing hard-learned local wisdom into warning efforts could save thousands of lives.

A woman cooks beside her tent at a temporary shelter in Palu, Indonesia, on Oct. 9. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Indonesia’s Disaster Politics

The latest earthquake and tsunami could be a major setback for the country’s democracy.

tsunami_graphic_100518

Is the World Ready for the Next Big Tsunami?

The latest disaster in Indonesia shows the need for the global system put in place in the wake of 2004’s devastating waves.

A demonstrator wearing a mask painted with the colors of the flag of East Turkestan and a hand bearing the colors of the Chinese flag attends a protest  in front of the Chinese consulate in Istanbul, on July 5, 2018.(OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

Islamic Leaders Have Nothing to Say About China’s Internment Camps for Muslims

Hundreds of thousands of Uighur have been detained without trial in China's western region of Xinjiang.

Protesters face Indonesian riot police as they move to break up a gathering outside the Indonesian High Court building in Jakarta on May 12, 2017, to demand the release of Jakarta's governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama better known as "Ahok". 
Jakarta's Christian governor was jailed for two years after being found guilty of blasphemy, in a shock decision that has stoked concerns over rising religious intolerance in the world's most populous Muslim-majority nation. / AFP PHOTO / GOH CHAI HIN        (Photo credit should read GOH CHAI HIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ghosts of Pogroms Past Haunt Indonesia

After the jailing of Jakarta's former governor, Chinese Indonesians are caught between age-old prejudice and fears of a rising China.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.