infrastructure

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan speaks with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Beijing.

Belt and Road Tests China’s Image in Pakistan

As China’s presence in Pakistan grows, the countries’ special relationship could be strained.

Indian workers use boats to remove sand in Allahabad on March 16, 2018.

The Coming Sand Wars

Battles over mining sand in India are only the beginning.

Pakistani naval personnel stand guard near a ship at the Gwadar port on Nov. 13, 2016.

Will Balochistan Blow Up China’s Belt and Road?

Violence in the Pakistani province is on the rise—and now Chinese nationals are the target.

Balloons rise over what was at the time the world’s longest steel arch, Lupu Bridge in Shanghai, during the open-to-traffic ceremony on June 28, 2003. (Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images)

China’s Provinces Can’t Afford Beijing’s Development Plans

Rising local debt is making the Chinese economy even more fragile.

Adolf Hitler riding in a car with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini in Munich in Sept. 1937. (AFP/Getty Images)

Hitler Loved Speed Limits

Germany’s unregulated highways might be the most irrational aspect of its modern identity—but you can’t blame it on the Führer.

An aerial view of the world's longest cross-sea bridge, the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge, after the major work of the bridge was completed in Zhuhai city, south China's Guangdong province, on Dec. 31, 2017. (Imaginechina via AP Images)

Beijing Is Foisting a White Elephant on Hong Kong

The massive Greater Bay Area project is about China's needs, not Hong Kongers.

People's Liberation Army personnel attending the opening ceremony of China's new military base in Djibouti. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Djibouti Become Latest Country to Fall Into China’s Debt Trap?

The African country houses a key U.S. military base, making it a particular concern for Washington.

(William Thomas Cain/Getty Images/Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Erdogan’s Flying Carpet

Istanbul’s massive new airport fits with Turkey’s grand neo-Ottoman ambitions, but it may be too big for its own good.

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