Intelligence

Document of the Week: The 2002 National Intelligence Estimate on WMDs in Iraq

The Iraq intelligence debacle casts a shadow over the U.S. assessment of a threat from Iran.

A Sri Lankan security officer stands guard at a roadside checkpoint in Minuwangoda on May 14.

You Can’t Defeat Tomorrow’s Terrorists by Fighting Yesterday’s Enemy

Countries from Sri Lanka and Israel to the United States and Norway have failed to prevent attacks because their intelligence agencies were fixated on the last threat rather than the next one.

Indonesian workers transport ballot boxes for the upcoming general elections at the Bonto Matinggi village in Maros, South Sulawesi, on April 16. (Daeng Mansur/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

In recent days, Washington raced to decipher the Mueller report and Indonesian voters cast ballots at more than 800,000 polling stations.

Rafi Eitan, who was a member of the Mossad team that captured Adolf Eichmann in Argentina in 1960, waves to photographers during an exhibition at the Knesset in Jerusalem on December 12, 2011, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the verdict against Eichmann, who was instrumental in the planning and execution the Holocaust.

Remembering Israel’s Most Celebrated Spy

Rafi Eitan was no 007. He was far more cunning.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu  talks with soldiers as he stands near a naval Iron Dome defense systeminstalled on a Sa'ar 5 Lahav Class corvette of the Israeli Navy fleet, in the northern  port of Haifa on Feb. 12.

China Is Spying On Israel to Steal U.S. Secrets

Benjamin Netanyahu ignored the intelligence operations of Beijing and Moscow for too long. Now, the Israeli government is finally paying attention, but it could be too late.

People lay flowers and notes to pay tribute to those killed in a shooting the day before at Al Noor Mosque and Linwood Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 16. (Recep Sakar/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Christchurch Has Seen Trauma Before—Just Not Like This

The quiet New Zealand city has endured natural disaster. But until March 15, it had never faced an unnatural one.

U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Dec. 13. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Neither Side Gets the Khashoggi Debate Right

The tribalism infecting U.S. domestic politics has unfortunately crept deep into the foreign-policy discourse.

U.S. Marines land in Stordal, Norway, on Jan. 16, 2017. (Ned Alley/AFP/Getty Images)

A New Cold Front in Russia’s Information War

As NATO’s footprint grows in Norway, Moscow may be using an espionage case to inflame the country’s internal divisions.

In this handout photo issued by the London Metropolitan Police, poisoning suspects Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov are shown on CCTV in Salisbury on March 4. (Metropolitan Police via Getty Images)

Russia’s Military Intelligence Agency Isn’t Stupid

Don’t let the reporting on the suspected Skripal attackers fool you: Moscow got what it wanted.

A security camera outside the FBI headquarters in Washington on Feb. 2. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Why Did an Israeli Intelligence Firm Spy on a Former Obama Official?

On our podcast: Colin Kahl was targeted by Black Cube, the same company Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein hired to discredit his accusers.

U.S. President Donald Trump stands alongside Gina Haspel before she is sworn in as director of the Central Intelligence Agency during a ceremony at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia on May 21. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The ‘Time of Troubles’ Is Back for America’s Spies

If you want to understand the tensions between policymakers and spooks under Donald Trump, look to the 1970s.

U.S. President Donald Trump discusses his summit in Helsinki with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a meeting with House Republicans in the Cabinet Room of the White House on July 17. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

How Much Damage Did Trump Cause in Helsinki?

The president’s disgraceful remarks could have disturbing results.

Eritrean Foreign Minister Osman Saleh Mohammed (R) walks with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (C) as an Eritrean delegation arrives for peace talks with Ethiopia at the international airport in Addis Ababa on June 26, 2018.

Ethiopia and Eritrea Have a Common Enemy

Abiy Ahmed and Isaias Afwerki are racing toward peace because they both face the same threat: hard-liners in the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front.

CIA Director nominee Gina Haspel waits for her confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 9. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Torture, Morality at Heart of Senate Hearing on Trump’s Pick to Head CIA

Gina Haspel dodges questions but appears headed toward narrow confirmation.

Abiy Ahmed, newly elected Prime Minister of Ethiopia, addresses the house of Parliament in Addis Ababa, after the swearing in ceremony on April 2, 2018.

Can Abiy Ahmed Save Ethiopia?

The announcement of a new prime minister has led to widespread celebrations, but reforming the country without alienating the army will not be easy.

Russian President  Vladimir Putin enters a hall to meet with other candidates a day after the presidential election, at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 19, 2018.

How Not to Pressure Putin

Britain needs strategic patience, not shrill denunciations, to keep Russia in check.

Illuminated portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il on display amid the night skyline in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Nov. 25, 2016. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

All Eyes on North Korea

Intelligence agencies are surging resources to focus on the Korean Peninsula.

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