Intelligence

U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Dec. 13. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Neither Side Gets the Khashoggi Debate Right

The tribalism infecting U.S. domestic politics has unfortunately crept deep into the foreign-policy discourse.

U.S. Marines land in Stordal, Norway, on Jan. 16, 2017. (Ned Alley/AFP/Getty Images)

A New Cold Front in Russia’s Information War

As NATO’s footprint grows in Norway, Moscow may be using an espionage case to inflame the country’s internal divisions.

In this handout photo issued by the London Metropolitan Police, poisoning suspects Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov are shown on CCTV in Salisbury on March 4. (Metropolitan Police via Getty Images)

Russia’s Military Intelligence Agency Isn’t Stupid

Don’t let the reporting on the suspected Skripal attackers fool you: Moscow got what it wanted.

A security camera outside the FBI headquarters in Washington on Feb. 2. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Why Did an Israeli Intelligence Firm Spy on a Former Obama Official?

On our podcast: Colin Kahl was targeted by Black Cube, the same company Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein hired to discredit his accusers.

U.S. President Donald Trump stands alongside Gina Haspel before she is sworn in as director of the Central Intelligence Agency during a ceremony at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia on May 21. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The ‘Time of Troubles’ Is Back for America’s Spies

If you want to understand the tensions between policymakers and spooks under Donald Trump, look to the 1970s.

U.S. President Donald Trump discusses his summit in Helsinki with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a meeting with House Republicans in the Cabinet Room of the White House on July 17. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

How Much Damage Did Trump Cause in Helsinki?

The president’s disgraceful remarks could have disturbing results.

Eritrean Foreign Minister Osman Saleh Mohammed (R) walks with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (C) as an Eritrean delegation arrives for peace talks with Ethiopia at the international airport in Addis Ababa on June 26, 2018.

Ethiopia and Eritrea Have a Common Enemy

Abiy Ahmed and Isaias Afwerki are racing toward peace because they both face the same threat: hard-liners in the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front.

CIA Director nominee Gina Haspel waits for her confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 9. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Torture, Morality at Heart of Senate Hearing on Trump’s Pick to Head CIA

Gina Haspel dodges questions but appears headed toward narrow confirmation.

Abiy Ahmed, newly elected Prime Minister of Ethiopia, addresses the house of Parliament in Addis Ababa, after the swearing in ceremony on April 2, 2018.

Can Abiy Ahmed Save Ethiopia?

The announcement of a new prime minister has led to widespread celebrations, but reforming the country without alienating the army will not be easy.

Russian President  Vladimir Putin enters a hall to meet with other candidates a day after the presidential election, at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 19, 2018.

How Not to Pressure Putin

Britain needs strategic patience, not shrill denunciations, to keep Russia in check.

Illuminated portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il on display amid the night skyline in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Nov. 25, 2016. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

All Eyes on North Korea

Intelligence agencies are surging resources to focus on the Korean Peninsula.

A Palestinian boy holds a bunch of plastic flowers as he plays on the rubble of assassinated Hamas interior minister Said Siam's apartment building during a Hamas rally in Jabalia, on January 20, 2009. Arab leaders today pledged "all forms of support for the reconstruction of Gaza" but failed to set up a specific fund for the war-battered Palestinian enclave, as they wound up a two-day summit. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)

How Israel Won a War but Paid a High Moral Price

A decade of targeted assassinations has pushed the boundaries of Israel's laws and military ethics — and harmed its image across the globe.

A computer monitor displays a map available on the Strava website in Washington on Jan. 29. (Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images)

How the Spies Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Fitbit

The debate over whether fitness trackers should be allowed in sensitive areas has dragged on for years.

A bird sitting on the head of a white rhino at Kruger National Park in South Africa on June 22, 2010.   (PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)

Size Doesn’t Matter for Spies Anymore

In the era of cyber-espionage, even the smallest countries can play on the biggest stage.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi attends a military ceremony in Paris on October 24, 2017.

Egypt’s Undemocratic Election

Under Sisi’s iron fist, only one candidate is allowed to run.

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) seal is displayed in the lobby of CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, on August 14, 2008. (Getty/AFP/Saul Loeb)

Financier Is Top Choice to Advise President on Intelligence Matters

Trump has finally picked members for a key intelligence advisory board, and billionaire Stephen Feinberg is slated to head it.

Chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) and ranking member Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA)  of the Senate Intelligence Committee listen to testimony from Intelligence officials in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill on June 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Lawmakers Demand Investigation Into Lack of Whistleblower Protections for Spies

Senate leaders across party lines are concerned intelligence community watchdogs are failing to protect whistleblowers.

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