International Relations

People walk on the Columbia University campus

Beyond IR’s Ivory Tower

The world needs experts to engage with policy more than ever. Research shows international relations scholars are already up to the task.

Former U.S. Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton attend the trophy presentation prior to Thursday foursome matches of the Presidents Cup at Liberty National Golf Club on September 28, 2017 in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Is the Blob Really Blameless?

How not to evaluate American grand strategy.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, meeting during the Casablanca conference, preparing the Normandy and Italy landing, which lasted from Jan. 14 to 24, 1943.

The Postwar Global Order That Never Happened

After the wreckage of World War II, a new form of global community had huge momentum—but the United States rejected it.

US President Donald Trump attends the UN Climate Action Summit on Sept. 23, 2019 at the United Nations Headquaters in New York City.

Countries Should Mind Their Own Business

Two cheers for a classic idea that’s been out of fashion for too long: state sovereignty.

coronavirus-global-leadership-hegemony-tom-straw-illustration-foreign-policy-vertical

Welcome to the Post-Leader World

The United States has abdicated its dominant role. Here’s how to fill the gap.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

race-international-relations-foreign-policy-illustration

Why Race Matters in International Relations

Western dominance and white privilege permeate the field. It’s time to change that.

Economic Freedom Fighters supporters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria, on June 8 in solidarity with the global Black Lives Matter movement.

The Legacy of American Racism at Home and Abroad

Domestic racism has long impacted U.S. foreign policy. It’s time to open up about it.

The campus of Georgetown University is seen nearly empty as classes were canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic in Washington May 7.

How to Rethink the Teaching of International Relations

As universities struggle to respond to the ongoing pandemic, here’s what they should focus on.

U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger appears before the Senate Appropriations Committee in Washington on April 15, 1975, to urge approval of President Gerald Ford's request for military and humanitarian aid to South Vietnam.

Welcome Back to Kissinger’s World

Neoconservatism has died, and liberal internationalism is discredited. Perhaps it’s time to return to the ideas of one of the last century’s greatest realists.

Shafts of sunlight beam down from behind clouds  in Tokyo on Aug. 14, 2019.

The Pandemic’s 5 Silver Linings

The coronavirus has exacted a terrible toll—but some good things may come of it yet.

The bronze sculpture "Depression Bread Line" by George Segal—seen here on March 7, 2009, at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington—shows five men waiting in line near a door during the Great Depression and the inactivity and troubles of everyday citizens then.

Will a Global Depression Trigger Another World War?

The coronavirus pandemic has already devastated the international economy. Its military fallout remains to be seen.

U.S. President Donald Trump

Snap Poll: What Foreign-Policy Experts Make of Trump’s Coronavirus Response

International relations scholars examine how the United States is seen on a global stage—and share who they would vote for in a presidential election.

Bekhzod Tashkenbaev of Uzbekistan participates in the first World High Wire Championships, over the Han River in Seoul, on May 3, 2007.

The United States Forgot Its Strategy for Winning Cold Wars

The plan that worked to defeat the Soviet Union can work today against China—it’s just not what you think.

Former President Bill Clinton, former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Vice President Joe Biden, and former President Barack Obama arrive at the funeral service for Rep. Elijah Cummings in Baltimore on Oct. 25, 2019.

There’s No Such Thing as Good Liberal Hegemony

It’s not just that the United States has made mistakes—the very idea of U.S. global leadership is broken from the ground up.

The European Union flag is seen through a windshield covered with raindrops in Sofia, Bulgaria on May 15, 2006.

Europe’s Post-Brexit Future Is Looking Scary

The continent is suddenly facing serious questions about its future role in world politics—and even in the trans-Atlantic relationship.

Jeff Bezos

Who’s More Powerful, Jeff Bezos or Mohammed bin Salman? Neither.

The relationship between the two men proves that, even at a time of rapid technological and economic change, you can’t buy real power.

A Turkish bombardment on Syria's northeastern town of Ras al-Ain.

Is the World Getting Safer?

New research debunks the theory that wars are becoming less deadly and less frequent.