Internet

People lay flowers and notes to pay tribute to those killed in a shooting the day before at Al Noor Mosque and Linwood Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 16. (Recep Sakar/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Christchurch Has Seen Trauma Before—Just Not Like This

The quiet New Zealand city has endured natural disaster. But until March 15, it had never faced an unnatural one.

Norwegian mass murder Anders Behring Breivik makes a Nazi salute before his appeal hearing at a court at the Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, on Jan. 10, 2017.

The Dark Web Enabled the Christchurch Killer

The attack in New Zealand was inspired in part by the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik, but the real threat is lone wolves lurking in the far corners of the Internet.

A member of staff poses for a photograph at a workspace in the National Cyber Security Centre on Feb. 14, 2017 in London, England. (Carl Court/Getty Images)

How to Regulate the Internet Without Becoming a Dictator

The British model of filtering data rather than content can protect citizens while preserving an open internet.

A police officer removes tires set by protesters during a demonstration in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, on Jan. 14. (Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images)

Zimbabwe Crackdown Saps Hopes of Reform

The violence is a blow to Zimbabweans who hoped for greater freedom of expression in the post-Mugabe era.

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The War-Torn Web

A once-unified online world has broken into new warring states.

Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter chief executive officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing  on Capitol Hill, September 5, 2018 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The Internet Is Going To End Up Like Greece

When the big players get away with open fraud, trust disintegrates.

An Iranian traveler arrives at a bus terminal in Tehran on Jan. 13. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

The App Destroying Iran’s Currency

Iranians are using the messaging app Telegram to spread fake news about the rial—and make a profit for themselves.

Demonstrators rally outside the Federal Communications Commission building to protest against the end of net neutrality rules in Washington on Dec. 14, 2017. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Net Neutrality’s End Will Let Power Eat the Internet

Information is getting more centralized as online norms fracture.

Andrew Marshall. (Lexey Swall for Foreign Policy)

The Return of the Pentagon’s Yoda

Can Andrew Marshall, the U.S. military’s longtime oracle, still predict the future?

A computer user in a net cafe in Chongqing Municipality on January 21, 2008. (China Photos/Getty Images)

China’s Lessons for Fighting Fake News

What Washington should—and shouldn’t—learn from Beijing’s example.

Giant letters, reading the word "blockchain" are displayed at the blockchain centre, which aims at boosting start-ups, on February 7, 2018 in Lithuania's capital Vilnius.
(PETRAS MALUKAS/AFP/Getty Images)

America Needs a Blockchain Strategy ASAP

The technology behind cryptocurrency can keep the United States safe—but only if the country takes advantage of its head start.

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

Our Data, Ourselves

How to stop tech firms from monopolizing our personal information.

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

The New Economy’s Old Business Model Is Dead

Tech companies are used to pairing big revenues with small labor forces. But they’ll soon be forced to become massive job creators.

Musician turned politician Robert Kyagulanyi (C) is joined by other activists on July 11, 2018 in Kampala, Uganda during a protest against a controversial tax on the use of social media.

Africa’s Attack on Internet Freedom

While Washington turns a blind eye, autocrats across the continent are muzzling their citizens online.

People in Tehran check their mobile phones as they wait in the streets after an earthquake near Iranian capital on Dec. 21, 2017. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Ban of Messaging App Hurts Economy at Pivotal Moment

Rights group says app was widely used by businesses and even government offices.

Effigies of US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un will be paraded through the streets of Lewes in Sussex, southern England, on November 4, 2017, during the traditional Bonfire Night celebrations.
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

North Korean Internet Users Shun Facebook and Google for Chinese Alternatives

A new report sheds light on how a tiny fraction of North Koreans browse the open web.

An Iranian woman raises her fist amid tear gas smoke during a protest at the University of Tehran on Dec. 30, 2017. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Sanctions Abet Iranian Internet Censorship

If the United States wants to stand behind the next #IranProtests, it should liberalize rules that impede access to cutting-edge tools against repression.

A damaged circuitboard. (Flickr)

Learning to Fight When Screens Go Dark

If we woke up tomorrow and found that none of our laptops, iPhones, iPads, or personal assistants worked, what would we do?

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