iran nuclear

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani addresses a High-Level Meeting on Nuclear Disarmament during the 68th United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York City on Sept. 26, 2013.

A Dangerous Game of Nuclear Brinkmanship

By threatening to breach the nuclear deal, Tehran hopes to scare Europe into prodding the United States back to the negotiating table. It may not work.

Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures during the awarding ceremony of the Order of Parental Glory at the Grand Kremlin Palace in Moscow on May 30.

Pentagon Wary of Russia-Iran Cooperation

Top Defense Department official warns Middle East allies that Moscow is not a reliable partner.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks on a morning TV show from the grounds of the White House in Washington on May 9, 2018.

U.S. Hard-line Stance on Iran Rattles Allies

As Trump’s national security team barrels toward a confrontation in the Persian Gulf, Europe is starting to balk.

Iranians gather in Tehran during a demonstration to support the goverment's decision to pull out from the nuclear deal on May 10.

Iranians Will Tolerate Hardship but Not Capitulation

Tehran’s recent nuclear policy announcements were driven by the inescapable constraints of domestic politics.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally in Tehran on May 10. US President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the agreement in May of last year and reinstated unilateral economic sanctions. (Photo by STR / AFP)        (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran Still Doesn’t Want an Escalation

The country may have threatened to walk away from the nuclear deal, but its actions say it may be prepared to stay.

U.S. President Donald Trump and National Security Advisor John Bolton during a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House on May 22, 2018.

Echoes of Iraq in Trump’s Confrontation with Iran

The rising tensions with Tehran bear disturbing similarities to the run-up to war in 2003. Chief among them: the presence of John Bolton.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks during a cabinet meeting in Tehran on April 24.

Rouhani’s Warning to Trump

The Iranian president’s remarks about the future of the Iran nuclear deal.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press conference at the State Department in Washington on April 22.

Maximum Pressure on Iran Won’t Work

Trump’s new Iran sanctions will hurt the United States in the long term.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif gestures during a press conference in Tehran on Feb. 13. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Foreign Minister Is Staying, but That Doesn’t Mean He’s Won the Battle of Ideas

Javad Zarif’s gambit paid off, but his attempt to be a bridge between Tehran and the West has become virtually impossible in the Trump era.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif checks his watch during a press conference in Tehran on Feb. 13. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Time Up for Zarif?

The foreign minister’s fall from grace was a long time coming.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif as he waits for the start of a meeting with P5+1, European Union, and Iranian officials at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 30, 2015, during Iran nuclear talks. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Iran Lose Its Last Link to the West?

If accepted, Foreign Minister Javad Zarif’s resignation may open the door to a new Iranian radicalism.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks at a press conference in New York on Sept. 26. (Jim Watson/ AFP)

Iran Was Closer to a Nuclear Bomb Than Intelligence Agencies Thought

If Tehran pulls out of the 2015 deal, it could have a weapon in a matter of months.

Wendy Sherman, the U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs, sits next to (from left) U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Robert Malley from the U.S. National Security Council, and European Union representative Helga Schmid during a negotiation session with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif over Iran's nuclear program in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 20, 2015. (Brian Snyder/AFP/Getty Images)

In Negotiations With Iran, ‘There’s Always One More Thing’

On the podcast: Wendy Sherman recounts the grueling path to the Iran nuclear deal.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with EU Foreign Policy Chief Federica Mogherini during a meeting at the European Union Headquarters in Brussels on May 25, 2017.

How Trump Can Get a Better Deal on Iran

The United States needs to keep Europe on board, go beyond sanctions, and ensure lasting bipartisan support for its new policy.

Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) march during a military parade in Tehran on Sept. 22.(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Tougher U.S. Sanctions Will Enrich Iran’s Revolutionary Guards

As the economic noose tightens on the Iranian economy, smugglers will thrive and the IRGC will be the first to profit.

A man passes a mural painted on the wall of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran, on May 9, 2018. (Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Iran Hawks Could Make a Bad Situation Worse

More pressure on Tehran won’t work. Here’s what Trump should really do.

Ali Akbar Velayati, chief foreign policy advisor to Iran's supreme leader, disembarks from his plane upon his arrival in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on November 7, 2017. (GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The Man Who Actually Runs Iran’s Foreign Policy

Tehran’s course is set by a shadowy figure behind the scenes—not the leaders who talk to the West.

Iranians walk past a mural in Tehran on Aug. 8. (Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Here’s How Trump Can Bring Iran Back to the Table

Maximum financial pressure might be enough to force new nuclear talks.

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