iran nuclear

A staff member positions an Iranian flag on a stage after a group picture during the Iran nuclear talks at Vienna International Centre in Austria on July 14, 2015.

With Iran, Biden Can’t Let Perfect Be the Enemy of Good

Why any new agreement would likely be worse than resuscitating the existing deal.

U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a memorandum reinstating sanctions on Iran after the U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal at the White House in Washington on May 8, 2018.

Why Biden’s Plan to Rejoin the Iran Deal Makes No Sense

This week’s escalation of tensions by Tehran looks like blackmail to force Biden to abandon sanctions—and give up leverage over the regime.

U.S. President Donald Trump

Iran: Maximum Pressure, Minimum Gain

In 2020, the Trump administration sought to bury the Iran nuclear deal for good. Biden is poised to breathe new life into the pact. 

A handout picture provided by the Iranian Army's official website on Sept. 11, 2020, shows an Iranian Ghader missile being fired during a military exercise near the strategic strait of Hormuz in southern Iran.

How Biden Can Stop Iran’s Conservatives From Undermining the Nuclear Deal

Insisting that Iran must abandon its missile program could fall into the hardliners’ trap and make a new agreement impossible.

Anti-war activists protest in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on Jan. 4, 2020.

Biden Shouldn’t Rush to Restore the Iran Nuclear Deal

Moving quickly to resurrect the JCPOA, as Biden seems set to do, would start his presidency with a hugely divisive controversy.

An Iranian man checks a display board at a currency exchange shop in Tehran, on Sept. 29.

Biden Needs to Move Fast if He Wants a New Deal With Iran

Moderates will lose the June 2021 presidential election in Iran unless there is a new agreement and sanctions relief—and the United States can forget diplomacy if hardliners win.

Members of the Iranian armed forces pray around the coffin of slain nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh during the burial ceremony in Tehran, on Nov. 30.

How Will Iran React to Another High-Profile Assassination?

The killing of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, a top nuclear scientist, will complicate the incoming Biden administration’s efforts to renew the nuclear deal—and could lead to escalation.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) speaks with then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden March 23, 2010 in Washington.

How Israel Should Prepare for Biden’s New Approach to Iran

Israeli officials should urge the new administration to maintain U.S. economic leverage over Iran while avoiding the personal vendettas and public policy feuds of the Obama era.

A picture of the front pages of Farsi newspapers with headlines featuring the 2020 U.S. presidential election results in Tehran on Nov. 8.

U.S. Hostility With Iran Only Serves Hardliners on Both Sides

The countries’ interests overlap in some key ways. Biden can work with that.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a news conference to announce the Trump administration's restoration of sanctions on Iran, on September 21, 2020, at the US State Department in Washington, DC.

U.S. Isolated at U.N. as Push to Ramp Up Pressure on Iran Fails

“We don’t need a cheering section,” said Trump’s U.N ambassador. But Washington does need international compliance to make snapback sanctions work.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani delivers a speech during the inaugural session of the new parliament following February elections, in Tehran on May 27.

For Iran, Negotiations Aren’t Optional

With its economy in trouble, Tehran will have to talk to Washington. But the next administration shouldn’t rush things.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo departs after speaking to reporters following a meeting with members of the U.N. Security Council in New York on Aug. 20.

Trump Can’t Have His Cake and Eat It Too on Iran Sanctions

Washington has no right to impose snapback sanctions on Tehran because it is no longer a participant in the Iran nuclear deal.

France's President Emmanuel Macron (L) shakes hands with his Iranian counterpart Hassan Rouhani (C) as Iran's foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif (R) and other members of the Iranian delegation stand next to them during an official meeting on September 18, 2017, in New York.

Europe Can Preserve the Iran Nuclear Deal Until November

After a humiliating defeat at the U.N. Security Council, Washington will seek snapback sanctions to sabotage what’s left of the nuclear deal. Britain, France, and Germany can still keep it alive until after the U.S. election.

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas speaks at a UN Security Council meeting at United Nations headquarters in New York on Feb. 26.

Don’t Let Iran Blow Up the U.N. Security Council

As a critical vote approaches, the fate of Iran nuclear sanctions—and decades of multilateralism—lies in the hands of Britain and France.

Pedestrians are reflected in a window displaying currency exchange rates in Tehran on June 22.

Maximum Pressure May Bring Iran Back to the Table After All

Combined with the COVID-19 pandemic, the country is struggling to stay afloat.

U.S. President Donald Trump signs a document reinstating sanctions against Iran after announcing the U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal at the White House in Washington on May 8, 2018.

Trump Misses Being Part of the Iran Deal

His administration wants to trigger the JCPOA’s snapback mechanism, but he probably can’t do that from the outside.

The Iranian military launches a missile during a naval exercise on June 18. The Iranian navy successfully tested new short- and long-range cruise missiles, coinciding with a rebound in tension with the United States, which seeks to extend the arms embargo against Iran.

Document of the Week: U.S. Pushes Doomed Iran Resolution at U.N.

Trump’s Iran gambit is sweeping, punitive, and has little chance of success.

Iranian women holding national flags and pictures of Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, take part a pro-government demonstration in Tehran on Nov. 25, 2019.

To Secure His Legacy, Khamenei Is Packing Iran’s Government With Young Radicals

The supreme leader’s youth-washing strategy could keep detente with the United States off the table for years.

Former U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks on stage during a public discussion at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina on February 17.

Did John Bolton Transform U.S. Foreign Policy or Enable Trump’s Transgressions?

The controversial former national security advisor left his mark in Washington—especially on nuclear arms deals and Iran.

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