iran nuclear

An Iranian medium range missile passes by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (center) during a military parade on September 22, 2017 in Tehran.

Length Doesn’t Matter

The United States and Europe need to get serious about limiting Iran’s missiles of all ranges — and the Missile Technology Control Regime should guide them.

Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) waits off stage before announcing he will not support President Barack Obama's Iran nuclear deal on Aug. 18, 2015 in South Orange, New Jersey. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Top Democrat’s Return Sows Uncertainty for Iran Deal

Iran hawk Bob Menendez’s reinstatement as top Democrat on Senate Foreign Relations Committee could alter politics around the nuclear deal.

Then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally organized by the Tea Party Patriots against the Iran nuclear deal in Washington, D.C., on Sep. 9, 2015. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s Where Advocates and Critics of the Iran Nuke Deal Can Agree

Supporters and detractors alike should see an opportunity in Trump's threats to the accord.

Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and the EU's foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini arrive to announce an agreement on the Iran nuclear talks on April 2, 2015 in Lausanne.

Europe Must Fight to Preserve the Iran Deal

If Washington walks away from the nuclear accord, it will undermine Europe’s security and business interests. Brussels should flex its muscles now with diplomatic and legal threats.

Iranian students protest at the University of Tehran during a demonstration driven by anger over economic problems, in the capital Tehran on Dec. 30, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Weighs Sanctions to Punish Iran Crackdown

The president offers blunt support for protesters in tweets, but a pivotal decision on the Iran nuclear deal is looming.

The U.S. capitol building on Sep. 27, 2013. (Getty Images)

Warning to Congress: Bad Iran Legislation Is Worse Than No Iran Legislation

President Trump can’t let the House and Senate play politics with Iranian nuclear deal.

Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang talks to U.S. President Donald Trump at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation leaders' summit in the Vietnamese city of Danang on Nov. 11. (Photo credit Jorge Silva/AFP/Getty Images)

Why Cozying Up to Trump Works

The rest of the world may not particularly like the U.S. president’s bluster, but playing to his ego is a pretty good strategy.

An IRGC Raad air defense system on display in Tehran on Sept. 21, 2012. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Did Iran Sanctions Make the Revolutionary Guard Stronger?

Sanctions regimes aren't simple, and they only work when their negative secondary effects do not outweigh their primary achievements.

Senator Bob Corker speaks to the press on Sep. 9, 2015. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Corker and Cotton’s False Promises Would Push Iran Toward Nuclearization

The Republican senators want to keep the JCPOA while adding new restrictions. It won’t work.

President Donald Trump in the Oval Office on Oct. 13. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

The Slippery ‘Spirit’ of Nixing the Iran Deal

Obama's JCPOA terms actually give the White House sound legal footing for decertification. But now Trump owns the consequences.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, right, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at U.N. headquarters in New York on Sept. 18. (Kevin Hagen/Getty Images)

Trump Has an Iran Strategy — But It Will Be Very Tough to Pull Off

The Trump administration’s game plan has a certain logic, but executing it will be the most difficult diplomatic gambit his team has attempted thus far.

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Trump Is Inching Toward War With Iran’s Revolutionary Guards

Decertifying the nuclear deal isn't the most dangerous decision about Iran the president will soon make.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover