iran sanctions

From left, EU Foreign Policy Chief Federica Mogherini, Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, Germany's Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, and then-British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the EU headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018.

How Europe Can Save What’s Left of the Iran Nuclear Deal

With the help of Russia and China, European leaders can prevent the total collapse of the 2015 agreement—and keep the region safer.

European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs Federica Mogherini (L); Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammad Javad Zarif (C) take part in a ministerial meeting on the Iran nuclear deal on July 6, 2018 in Vienna, Austria.

Iran Isn’t Trying to Build a Bomb Tomorrow. It Wants Sanctions Relief.

Iran’s decision to surpass uranium enrichment limits isn’t a dangerous provocation. It’s a calculated effort to get European leaders to reinforce the nuclear deal and halt the drift toward war.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (left) and then-Swiss President Alain Berset hold a joint press conference in Bern, Switzerland, on July 3, 2018.

How Close Is Iran to a Nuclear Bomb, Really?

Experts say Tehran has the capability to build a nuclear weapon within a few years but perhaps not the intent.

Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) and U.S. President Donald Trump arrive for a group photo at the G-20 Summit in Osaka on June 28.

G-20 Kicks Off in Osaka

Plus: Iran talks continue in Vienna, the aftermath of Ethiopia's attempted coup, and the other stories we're following today.

Hassan Rouhani attends the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, on June 14.

Rouhani to America: You’re Confused

A transcript of the Iranian president’s June 25 remarks.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani addresses a High-Level Meeting on Nuclear Disarmament during the 68th United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York City on Sept. 26, 2013.

A Dangerous Game of Nuclear Brinkmanship

By threatening to breach the nuclear deal, Tehran hopes to scare Europe into prodding the United States back to the negotiating table. It may not work.

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani attends the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit in Bishkek on June 14.

Iran in Retreat From Nuclear Deal

Plus: Hong Kong enters its second week of protest, Mexico begins its migration crackdown, and what to watch in the world this week.

Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammad Javad Zarif and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov meet in Moscow on May 8.

Trump Is Driving Iran into Russia’s Arms

U.S. sanctions won’t necessarily isolate Tehran. They could spur new strategic alliances.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani attends a military parade marking the country’s annual Army Day in Tehran on April 18.

How to Prevent an Accidental War With Iran

With the dangers of miscalculation or misunderstanding high, Trump should act now to make sure the only wars the United States enters are the ones it really wants to.

An Iraqi policeman stands guard at a border crossing between Iran and Iraq near the southern Iraqi city of Basra on Feb 26, 2007.

Iraq Is Not an Iranian Vassal State

These days, Tehran is having trouble getting what it wants from its neighbor—a development Washington can encourage by backing off.

Iranians gather in Tehran during a demonstration to support the goverment's decision to pull out from the nuclear deal on May 10.

Iranians Will Tolerate Hardship but Not Capitulation

Tehran’s recent nuclear policy announcements were driven by the inescapable constraints of domestic politics.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally in Tehran on May 10. US President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the agreement in May of last year and reinstated unilateral economic sanctions. (Photo by STR / AFP)        (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran Still Doesn’t Want an Escalation

The country may have threatened to walk away from the nuclear deal, but its actions say it may be prepared to stay.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks during a cabinet meeting in Tehran on April 24.

Rouhani’s Warning to Trump

The Iranian president’s remarks about the future of the Iran nuclear deal.

A customer looks at an Iranian-made washing machine at a store in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, on Aug. 8, 2018.

Don’t Let Iraq Fall Victim to U.S.-Iran Rivalry

Baghdad must insulate itself from the fallout by weaning itself from exclusive dependence on two outside backers.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press conference at the State Department in Washington on April 22.

Maximum Pressure on Iran Won’t Work

Trump’s new Iran sanctions will hurt the United States in the long term.

An Iranian laborer walks on the platform of the oil facility on Kharg Island off the coast of Iran.

Trump’s Big Iran Oil Gamble

By seeking to cut Iranian exports to zero, the U.S. president is taking a major economic and political risk.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

Kolbars carrying smuggled goods return from Iraq down the Kuh-e Takht mountain in Iran on Dec. 12, 2018. (Sergio Colombo and Andrea Prada Bianchi for Foreign Policy)

For Kurdish Smugglers, Iran Sanctions Are Starting to Bite

The kolbars brave subfreezing temperatures and border guards’ bullets to carry heavy loads over the mountains in an unemployment-plagued region that Iran’s government has all but forgotten.

Supporters of  Hezbollah hold posters of Iran's Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and the movement's slain former military commander, Imad Mughniyeh, on Sept. 20, 2018 in Beirut.

From Rogue to Regular

What will it take for Washington to accept Iran as a “normal” state?

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.