iran sanctions

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and China's President Xi Jinping attend a meeting in Shanghai on May 22, 2014.

Iran’s Pact With China Is Bad News for the West

Tehran’s new strategic partnership with Beijing will give the Chinese a strategic foothold and strengthen Iran’s economy and regional clout.

An International Atomic Energy Agency inspector visits the Natanz enrichment facility, south of Tehran, on Jan. 20, 2014.

Despite U.S. Sanctions, Iran Expands Its Nuclear Stockpile

Two years after Trump withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal, Tehran has cut in half the time it would need to produce enough weapons-grade fuel for a nuclear bomb.

Iranians shop at the Grand Bazaar in Tehran on April 20 as the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic lingers.

Why Hassan Rouhani Ended Iran’s Lockdown

The Islamic Republic could face a devastating second wave of coronavirus infections, but keeping the economy closed down without a safety net would have likely led to unrest and collapse.

Cuban health workers go door to door looking for possible cases of the novel coronavirus in Havana on March 31.

Ukraine to World: This Is Not the Time to Go Wobbly on Sanctions

With the coronavirus pandemic, the United States faces the greatest global challenge to its sanctions policy since the 1990s.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani walks past a portrait of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran on Feb. 16.

The Coronavirus Is Absolutely No Excuse to Lift Sanctions on Iran

Exploiting Iran's coronavirus crisis to demand an end to sanctions is fundamentally dishonest—and panders to a brutal regime.

A woman wearing a mask in Iran

Democrats Push Back on Sanctions, Citing Coronavirus Fears 

They want waivers to speed medical supplies and humanitarian aid to Iran and other sanctioned nations hit hard by the pandemic.

Iranians, some wearing protective masks

U.N. Calls for Rolling Back Sanctions to Battle Pandemic

Secretary-General Guterres says it’s time for “solidarity not exclusion.”

Iranian Deputy Health Minister Iraj Harirchi wipes the sweat off his face, during a press conference with the Islamic republic's government spokesman Ali Rabiei in Tehran on Feb. 24. He confirmed on Feb. 25 that he has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, amid a major outbreak in Iran.

As Coronavirus Spreads, Iranian Doctors Fear the Worst

Iran’s political and economic isolation hasn’t stopped COVID-19—but sanctions are threatening to turn an outbreak into a catastrophe.

An Iranian flag flies in front of the Bushehr nuclear power plant during an official ceremony to kick-start work on a second reactor at the facility on Nov. 10, 2019.

Europe Puts What Remains of the JCPOA in Limbo

By triggering the Iran deal’s dispute resolution mechanism, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom are hoping to push the sides back to the negotiating table—but they may escalate instead.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (C) with Britain's then-Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson (R), France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L), Germany Foreign Minister Heiko Maas (2nd L) at the EU headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018.

Europe Is Running Out of Time to Save the Iran Deal

After initiating a dispute resolution process, European leaders have a limited window to provide Iran with meaningful economic relief and seek to reduce tensions between Tehran and Washington.

Members of Code Pink protest

Trump Has Made Sanctions a Path to Strikes

Economic measures can de-escalate tensions, but not if used crudely.

Iranian mourners attend the funeral of Morteza Ebrahimi, a commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, who was killed during demonstrations against a surprise gasoline price hike, in Shahriar on Nov. 20.

Don’t Expect a Thaw in Iran

The protests and prisoner exchange may put talks with the United States further off.

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani speaks at parliament in Tehran on Sept. 3.

For Many Iranians, Staying In the Nuclear Deal No Longer Makes Sense

Talks have little appeal because Tehran is convinced that Trump can’t be trusted to negotiate in good faith. And there isn’t much political support for observing what’s left of the deal while Washington wages economic war.

U.S. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper and Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Joseph Dunford hold a media briefing at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on Aug. 28.

In Muted Response to Iran Strikes, U.S. to Send Reinforcements to Saudi Arabia

Deployment will include missile defense capabilities and a “moderate” increase in troops.

A man uses binoculars to view the border with Israel on Sept. 2 at the "Garden of Iran" Park, which was built by the Iranian government, in the southern Lebanese village of Maroun al-Ras.

How to Make a Lasting Deal With Iran

Maximum pressure won’t make Tehran capitulate. Letting it enhance its conventional military capabilities could convince it to rein in proxies and curb its nuclear and missile programs.

An Iranian cancer patient at her parents' house in Tehran on Oct. 18, 2013.

U.S. Sanctions Are Killing Cancer Patients in Iran

Washington claims that maximum pressure won’t stop the supply of medicine and other humanitarian necessities, but banking sanctions are driving up import prices, blocking supply chains, and creating deadly drug shortages.

From left, EU Foreign Policy Chief Federica Mogherini, Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, Germany's Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, and then-British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the EU headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018.

How Europe Can Save What’s Left of the Iran Nuclear Deal

With the help of Russia and China, European leaders can prevent the total collapse of the 2015 agreement—and keep the region safer.

European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs Federica Mogherini (L); Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammad Javad Zarif (C) take part in a ministerial meeting on the Iran nuclear deal on July 6, 2018 in Vienna, Austria.

Iran Isn’t Trying to Build a Bomb Tomorrow. It Wants Sanctions Relief.

Iran’s decision to surpass uranium enrichment limits isn’t a dangerous provocation. It’s a calculated effort to get European leaders to reinforce the nuclear deal and halt the drift toward war.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (left) and then-Swiss President Alain Berset hold a joint press conference in Bern, Switzerland, on July 3, 2018.

How Close Is Iran to a Nuclear Bomb, Really?

Experts say Tehran has the capability to build a nuclear weapon within a few years but perhaps not the intent.

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