iran sanctions

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani attends a military parade marking the country’s annual Army Day in Tehran on April 18.

How to Prevent an Accidental War With Iran

With the dangers of miscalculation or misunderstanding high, Trump should act now to make sure the only wars the United States enters are the ones it really wants to.

An Iraqi policeman stands guard at a border crossing between Iran and Iraq near the southern Iraqi city of Basra on Feb 26, 2007.

Iraq Is Not an Iranian Vassal State

These days, Tehran is having trouble getting what it wants from its neighbor—a development Washington can encourage by backing off.

Iranians gather in Tehran during a demonstration to support the goverment's decision to pull out from the nuclear deal on May 10.

Iranians Will Tolerate Hardship but Not Capitulation

Tehran’s recent nuclear policy announcements were driven by the inescapable constraints of domestic politics.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally in Tehran on May 10. US President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the agreement in May of last year and reinstated unilateral economic sanctions. (Photo by STR / AFP)        (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran Still Doesn’t Want an Escalation

The country may have threatened to walk away from the nuclear deal, but its actions say it may be prepared to stay.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks during a cabinet meeting in Tehran on April 24.

Rouhani’s Warning to Trump

The Iranian president’s remarks about the future of the Iran nuclear deal.

A customer looks at an Iranian-made washing machine at a store in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, on Aug. 8, 2018.

Don’t Let Iraq Fall Victim to U.S.-Iran Rivalry

Baghdad must insulate itself from the fallout by weaning itself from exclusive dependence on two outside backers.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press conference at the State Department in Washington on April 22.

Maximum Pressure on Iran Won’t Work

Trump’s new Iran sanctions will hurt the United States in the long term.

An Iranian laborer walks on the platform of the oil facility on Kharg Island off the coast of Iran.

Trump’s Big Iran Oil Gamble

By seeking to cut Iranian exports to zero, the U.S. president is taking a major economic and political risk.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

Kolbars carrying smuggled goods return from Iraq down the Kuh-e Takht mountain in Iran on Dec. 12, 2018. (Sergio Colombo and Andrea Prada Bianchi for Foreign Policy)

For Kurdish Smugglers, Iran Sanctions Are Starting to Bite

The kolbars brave subfreezing temperatures and border guards’ bullets to carry heavy loads over the mountains in an unemployment-plagued region that Iran’s government has all but forgotten.

Supporters of  Hezbollah hold posters of Iran's Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and the movement's slain former military commander, Imad Mughniyeh, on Sept. 20, 2018 in Beirut.

From Rogue to Regular

What will it take for Washington to accept Iran as a “normal” state?

A woman walks past a currency exchange shop in Tehran's grand bazaar on Nov. 3, 2018.

Can a New Currency End Tehran’s Economic Woes?

The Central Bank of Iran wants to take four zeros off the rial—but redenomination won’t work miracles.

Iraqi boys walk past a shop in a local market in the northern city of Mosul on Nov. 21. ( Zaid al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Sanctions on Iran Will Harm Iraq

Baghdad is heavily dependent on trade with Tehran. Without an exemption from Washington, Iraqis—and the stability of the country—will suffer.

Iranian members of parliament display their disagreement over a bill, one of four put forward by the government to meet demands set by the international Financial Action Task Force,  in Tehran on Oct. 7. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Sanctions Are Just the Beginning for Iran

The economic blow to Tehran will be compounded if it fails to comply with global financial transparency rules.

An Iranian man shops at a drugstore at the Nikan hospital in Tehran on September 11, 2018.

How Europe Could Blunt U.S. Iran Sanctions Without Washington Lifting A Finger

If the EU gives its special purpose vehicle for Iran trade a humanitarian focus, the Trump administration won’t be able to stop it without trampling longstanding U.S. exemptions.

An Iranian woman walks past a mural in Tehran on Nov. 5. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran and the United States Can be Friends

They almost were, and now Hassan Rouhani could help get things back on track.

Iranian protesters carry placards that mock U.S. President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia’s King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman during a demonstration outside the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran on Nov. 4. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Iran Sanctions Could Work

In the medium term, they’ll make it hard for the country to keep up oil production, satisfy domestic demand, and fund the government.

A woman walks past a mural in Tehran on Nov. 6.(Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Trump’s Magical Thinking on Iran Sanctions Won’t Advance U.S. Interests

Far from convincing Tehran to cooperate, new U.S. measures are on track to achieve the exact opposite.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani shrugs during a press conference with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Tehran on Sept. 7. (Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)

Trump Waives Iran Sanctions for Turkey

How Erdogan could use the exception to outsmart the United States, again.

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