Iran

A partial view of the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, is reflected in the visor of a U.S. Army helicopter crew member as he looks out of a  Chinook helicopter flying  from the U.S. Embassy to Baghdad International airport on Jan. 9. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

Iraq Prepares to Evict U.S. Troops

Pro-Iran factions are pushing for the move just as the Islamic State is starting to hit back.

An image grab taken from the state-run Islamic Republic of Iran News Network (IRINN) on Feb. 4, 2008 shows a large rocket fired from the country's first space center in a desert in northern Semnan province. (AFP/Getty Images)

Iran Is Mastering the Final Frontier

Tehran’s military is advancing ever farther into outer space—and the threat is bigger than Washington is letting on.

Pakistani army soldiers gather near a vehicle at a border terminal in Ghulam Khan, a town in North Waziristan, on the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan, on January 27, 2019.

Everyone Wants a Piece of Afghanistan

A U.S. withdrawal has opened the door to a possible political settlement, but success will depend on regional powers and the country’s neighbors.

Protestors confront police at a rally marking International Women's Day in Istanbul on March 8. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, the world marked International Women’s Day, and the U.S. State Department canceled an award for a Finnish journalist who criticized Trump.

Protesters against the veil, protected by young men, march in central Tehran during demonstrations for women's rights on March 10, 1979. (Bettmann Archives/Getty Images)

The Flame of Feminism Is Alive in Iran

While Western activists defend the right of Muslims to wear the veil, Iranian women are fighting for a bigger cause: choice.

U.S. President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable discussion at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Targeting Center in Sterling, Virginia, on Feb. 2, 2018. (Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)

Maximum Pressure Yields Minimum Results

Trump’s favorite foreign-policy doctrine has failed.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif smiles during a press conference in Tehran on Feb. 13, 2019. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

How to Succeed in Iranian Politics Without Really Resigning

Iranian foreign minister Javad Zarif protested his weakness—and became stronger than ever.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif gestures during a press conference in Tehran on Feb. 13. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Foreign Minister Is Staying, but That Doesn’t Mean He’s Won the Battle of Ideas

Javad Zarif’s gambit paid off, but his attempt to be a bridge between Tehran and the West has become virtually impossible in the Trump era.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif checks his watch during a press conference in Tehran on Feb. 13. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Time Up for Zarif?

The foreign minister’s fall from grace was a long time coming.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif as he waits for the start of a meeting with P5+1, European Union, and Iranian officials at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 30, 2015, during Iran nuclear talks. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Iran Lose Its Last Link to the West?

If accepted, Foreign Minister Javad Zarif’s resignation may open the door to a new Iranian radicalism.

Iranians walk near the "Si-o-Se Pol" bridge (33 Arches bridge) over the Zayandeh Rud river in Isfahan on April 11, 2018. 
(Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran Is Committing Suicide by Dehydration

The Islamic Republic’s corruption is draining the country of its most precious resource: water.

Kolbars carrying smuggled goods return from Iraq down the Kuh-e Takht mountain in Iran on Dec. 12, 2018. (Sergio Colombo and Andrea Prada Bianchi for Foreign Policy)

For Kurdish Smugglers, Iran Sanctions Are Starting to Bite

The kolbars brave subfreezing temperatures and border guards’ bullets to carry heavy loads over the mountains in an unemployment-plagued region that Iran’s government has all but forgotten.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman laughs with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires on Nov. 30, 2018. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

Who’s Afraid of Saudi Nukes?

Riyadh’s reckless behavior foments widespread mistrust of its plans to buy nuclear reactors.

President Donald Trump salutes while joined by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo as a military carry team moves the transfer case containing the remains of Scott A. Wirtz during a dignified transfer at Dover Air Force Base, Jan. 19, 2019 in Dover, Delaware. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

All This Should Remind You of the Run-Up to the Iraq War

The march to war against Iran is echoing the drumbeats of America's last major Middle Eastern invasion.

Maverick, an American shorthair, keeps his claw on the mouse as he uses a computer at a press preview for the Cat Fanciers’ Association show at Madison Square Garden in New York on Oct. 10, 2007. (Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet ‘Charming Kitten,’ the Iranian Hackers Linked to Air Force Defector

Monica Witt fled to Iran and was indicted for espionage—alongside an Iranian hacking luminary.

President Hassan Rouhani speaks to the Iranian parliament in Tehran on Dec. 25, 2018. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Economy Is Crumbling, but Collapse Is a Long Way Off

Things will only get worse under Trump’s sanctions, but China, India, and other countries are still defiantly buying oil.

Haleh Esfandiari speaks during a press conference in Washington on Sept. 10, 2007. (Stephanie Kuykendal/Getty Images)

Transformation in Iran Will Come From Women

On the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, a former political prisoner assesses the prospect of change in Iran.

Prime Minister-elect Adel Abdul Mahdi addresses the Iraqi parliament during a vote on the new government in Baghdad on Oct. 24, 2018. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Iraq’s Old Divisions Undermine Its New Prime Minister?

In his first hundred days on the job, Adel Abdul Mahdi has hit entrenched political roadblocks to choosing cabinet ministers and changing a system of political patronage.

A U.S. Marine prepares to board an MV-22 Osprey on his way to a site near al-Tanf Garrison, Syria, on Sept. 7, 2018. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Carlos Lopez)

How U.S. Mission Creep in Syria and Iraq Could Trigger War With Iran

One previously unreported incident from 2017 illustrates the risks of Trump’s latest plan.

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