Iran

Wendy Sherman, the U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs, sits next to (from left) U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Robert Malley from the U.S. National Security Council, and European Union representative Helga Schmid during a negotiation session with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif over Iran's nuclear program in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 20, 2015. (Brian Snyder/AFP/Getty Images)

In Negotiations With Iran, ‘There’s Always One More Thing’

On the podcast: Wendy Sherman recounts the grueling path to the Iran nuclear deal.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with EU Foreign Policy Chief Federica Mogherini during a meeting at the European Union Headquarters in Brussels on May 25, 2017.

How Trump Can Get a Better Deal on Iran

The United States needs to keep Europe on board, go beyond sanctions, and ensure lasting bipartisan support for its new policy.

An Iranian tanker and a South Korean tanker docking at the platform of the oil facility in the Khark Island, on the shore of the Persian Gulf on March 12, 2017.

The Road to Tehran Runs Through Oslo

Norway—and Oman—can help end the impasse over Iran sanctions by creating an externally-managed and guaranteed oil fund.

Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) march during a military parade in Tehran on Sept. 22.(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Tougher U.S. Sanctions Will Enrich Iran’s Revolutionary Guards

As the economic noose tightens on the Iranian economy, smugglers will thrive and the IRGC will be the first to profit.

(Illustration by Matt Chase for Foreign Policy)

The Future of War Will Be ‘Liked’

In the social media age, what you share is deciding what happens on the battlefield.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks at the United Against Nuclear Iran Summit in New York on Sept. 25. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

John Bolton Is Living the Dream—for Now

After being snubbed his entire career, the national security advisor’s fierce unilateralism has at last become U.S. policy. But even he can’t stop Trump from making deals.

Yemeni mourners bury the bodies of Houthis killed in a car bomb attack which targeted a Shiite Muslim mosque in Sanaa during a group funeral procession in the Yemeni capital on July 22, 2015.

America Is Not an Innocent Bystander in Yemen

Washington has left a vacuum in the Middle East, letting U.S. allies do as they please—no matter how high the body count.

U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis and National Security Advisor John Bolton attend the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels on July 11.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Bolton Puts Mattis in a Tight Spot on Syria

Legally, the U.S. has to use troops there to fight the Islamic State. But the White House wants them to deter Iran.

Iranian women mourn during a public funeral in Ahvaz on Sept. 24. The ceremony was for those killed during an attack on a military parade over the weekend. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Did a Terrorist Attack Just Save the Iranian Regime?

After a strike on a military parade, nationalist sentiment is on the rise—and not a moment too soon for a government that was facing deepening discontent.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks next to European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini during a plenary session at the United Nations building in Vienna, Austria on July 14, 2015. (Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images)

Is the Iran Deal Finally Dead?

Europe’s frantic efforts to save the nuclear pact at the U.N. probably won’t work.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 25. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Trump Takes Aim at Iran, China, and the Global System in Big U.N. Speech

And draws a rare laugh from world leaders while boasting of his accomplishments.

A man passes a mural painted on the wall of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran, on May 9, 2018. (Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Iran Hawks Could Make a Bad Situation Worse

More pressure on Tehran won’t work. Here’s what Trump should really do.

A Yemeni man walks past burning tires in Aden on Sept. 6. (Saleh al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Doubles Down on War in Yemen

Despite mounting violence, the United States will continue supporting airstrikes against Iran-backed Houthi rebels.

Chinese shipping containers await transportation at the Port of Long Beach in California on July 12. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Trade War With China Is About to Get Supersized

Washington is levying more tariffs, leaving Beijing to retaliate in other painful ways, from Iran to North Korea.

Massoud Barzani, a leader of the Kurdish Democratic Party, in Iraq's Nineveh province in Nov. 2015. (Reza/Getty Images)

This Is Where Iran Defeats the United States

Iraq’s Kurdish kingmakers used to side with Washington. Now, Tehran seems like a more attractive partner.

The dollar’s dominant role in the global financial system, and thus U.S. sanctions power, is driving the search for alternatives. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

The Buck Stops Here: Europe Seeks Alternative to U.S.-Dominated Financial System

Germany and France complain that the U.S. is abusing sanctions power to bully even its allies.

Ali Akbar Velayati, chief foreign policy advisor to Iran's supreme leader, disembarks from his plane upon his arrival in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on November 7, 2017. (GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The Man Who Actually Runs Iran’s Foreign Policy

Tehran’s course is set by a shadowy figure behind the scenes—not the leaders who talk to the West.

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