Iraq

Britain's Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, gestures to the crowd not to cheer him before he speaks during a rally in central London on May 12, 2018.

Jeremy Corbyn Has a Soft Spot for Extremists

The British Labour leader misses no opportunity to condemn the West, but he’s full of praise for violent revolutionaries.

Massoud Barzani, a leader of the Kurdish Democratic Party, in Iraq's Nineveh province in Nov. 2015. (Reza/Getty Images)

This Is Where Iran Defeats the United States

Iraq’s Kurdish kingmakers used to side with Washington. Now, Tehran seems like a more attractive partner.

Iraqis celebrate with a picture of the Shiite cleric, Muqtada al-Sadr, after the general election in Baghdad on May 14, 2018.

I Fought Against Muqtada al-Sadr. Now He’s Iraq’s Best Hope.

The former militia leader who once terrorized U.S. forces has reinvented himself as an Iraqi nationalist and a pragmatist.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (R) shakes hands with Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (L) at the Great Hall of the People on March 17, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Lintao Zhang - Pool/Getty Images)

China Smells Opportunity in the Middle East’s Crisis

Beijing is using the region's ongoing woes to solidify its own geopolitical agenda.

A man watches a television news screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a railway station in Seoul on May 16, 2018. (JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

North Korea Is Following the Saddam Hussein Playbook

The big question for the world is whether the United States will now follow its old Iraq playbook, too.

G-7 leaders participate in a working session in Quebec, Canada, on June 8. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States and Europe Still Need Each Other

In the run-up to the G-7 summit, Trump seemed to forget a key lesson from history.

Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr attends the demonstration against the western bombings of Syria, which he called for, on april 15, 2018, in Najaf. (HAIDAR HAMDANI/AFP/Getty Images)

Iraq’s Top 10 Potential Prime Ministers

Will it be the Harvard- and MIT-educated mandarin, the coveralls-wearing man of the people — or someone else the world has never heard of?

U.S. President Donald Trump in the White House after announcing his decision to leave the Iran nuclear deal on May 8. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Will the End of the Iran Deal Mark the Beginning of an Iran Strategy?

The time is ripe for a U.S. approach based on pushing Iranian domestic politics into crisis.

A member of the Iraqi security forces after voting in Baghdad on May 10. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

As Iraq Goes to the Polls, the U.S. and Iran Hang Back

For the first time since the military defeat of the Islamic State, Iraqis are voting for a new parliament. And Tehran and Washington aren’t getting in the way.

A torn up campaign poster for Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, for the upcoming parliamentary elections in the capital of the northern Iraqi Kurdish autonomous region Arbil. (SAFIN HAMED / AFP)

Welcome to Iraq’s First Post-Sectarian Election

Iraqi politicians are finally crossing ethnic and religious lines. But how long can the good vibes last?

A Turkish tank on a hilltop overlooking the Turkey-Syria border on Oct. 9, 2014. (Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

When Diplomacy Disappears

The Trump Administration’s lack of engagement has made the terrorist threat worse.

A U.S. convoy of armored vehicles on the outskirts of the Syrian city of Manbij on March 5, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Iranian-Backed Militias Set Sights on U.S. Forces

Airstrikes against Syria may galvanize support against the United States.

Chris Gash illustration for Foreign Policy

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.

A convoy of U.S. armored vehicles near the northern Syrian city of Manbij, on March 5, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Contradicts Top Officials on Syria Policy

Two events, just minutes apart, had very different messages.

A member of the Iraqi security forces walks past an Islamic State logo on the outskirts of Mosul on March 1, 2017. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS 2.0 Is Really Just the Original ISIS

Without territory, the Islamic State has quickly reverted back to its origins as a terrorist group.

Members of Iraq's Popular Mobilization Forces in the city of Basra watch a televised statement by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi on Dec. 9, 2017. (Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Can’t Afford to Forget About Iraq

Having won the war, will the United States end up yet again squandering the peace?

Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama at the Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Boston on Aug. 29, 2009. (Brian Snyder-Pool/Getty Images)

The Middle East’s Age of Innocence Is Over

The traditional object of the West’s romantic foreign-policy visions is now the graveyard of its idealism.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., tours a U.S.-funded supermarket in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan on May 21, 2017.  (Raad Adayleh/AFP/Getty Images)

Haley: Vote With U.S. at U.N. or We’ll Cut Your Aid

In a proposed aid overhaul, Nikki Haley embraces an “America first” foreign policy.

A burning mural of Saddam Hussein in Kirkuk on April 11, 2003. (Patrick Barth/Getty Images)

Baathism Caused the Chaos in Iraq and Syria

The United States invaded the Levant 15 years ago – but the region’s scorched-earth ideology has kept the fire burning.

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