Iraq

Iraqi men flash the victory gesture from inside a car during the Hashed Shaabi (Popular Mobilisation) paramilitary forces' celebrations marking the first anniversary of victory over the Islamic State (IS) group on December 10, 2018. (Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images)

Start Small to Stop the Next ISIS

One year on from the defeat of the Islamic State, the new U.S. Congress should draw on lessons learned from efforts to counter violent extremism.

U.S. President George H.W. Bush in the White House on Sept. 27, 1991 (Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images)

 George H.W. Bush’s Misunderstood Presidency

The late 41st U.S. president’s prudence was once derided as the wimp factor, but it has aged well.

Herto Hamrash Minut, 74, sits outside his house on Sinjar Mountain, where he lives with his two wives and 12 children. Four years ago, he was kidnapped and tortured by the Islamic State for eight months. (Sam Mednick for Foreign Policy)

ISIS May Be Gone, But Iraq’s Yazidis Are Still Suffering

The defeat of the Islamic State has created a power vacuum in the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar, leaving the Yazidi minority at the mercy of competing militias.

Iraqi protesters watch an official building in flames as they demonstrate against the government and the lack of basic services in Basra on Sept. 6. (Haidar Hohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

Northern Iraq May Be Free, but the South Is Seething

The world has focused on rebuilding the country’s north after defeating the Islamic State while ignoring festering resentment and poverty in Basra.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh on October 23, 2018. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Is the Next Saddam Hussein

In the 1980s, the United States embraced a brutal Middle Eastern tyrant simply because he opposed Iran. Washington should not repeat the same mistake today.

Demonstrators take part in the People's Vote march calling for a referendum on a final Brexit deal in central London on Oct. 20. (Nikilas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images)

Referendum Redux?

Two years after deciding to leave the European Union, many Brits want a second vote on Brexit.

Britain's Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, gestures to the crowd not to cheer him before he speaks during a rally in central London on May 12, 2018.

Jeremy Corbyn Has a Soft Spot for Extremists

The British Labour leader misses no opportunity to condemn the West, but he’s full of praise for violent revolutionaries.

Massoud Barzani, a leader of the Kurdish Democratic Party, in Iraq's Nineveh province in Nov. 2015. (Reza/Getty Images)

This Is Where Iran Defeats the United States

Iraq’s Kurdish kingmakers used to side with Washington. Now, Tehran seems like a more attractive partner.

Iraqis celebrate with a picture of the Shiite cleric, Muqtada al-Sadr, after the general election in Baghdad on May 14, 2018.

I Fought Against Muqtada al-Sadr. Now He’s Iraq’s Best Hope.

The former militia leader who once terrorized U.S. forces has reinvented himself as an Iraqi nationalist and a pragmatist.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (R) shakes hands with Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (L) at the Great Hall of the People on March 17, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Lintao Zhang - Pool/Getty Images)

China Smells Opportunity in the Middle East’s Crisis

Beijing is using the region's ongoing woes to solidify its own geopolitical agenda.

A man watches a television news screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a railway station in Seoul on May 16, 2018. (JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

North Korea Is Following the Saddam Hussein Playbook

The big question for the world is whether the United States will now follow its old Iraq playbook, too.

G-7 leaders participate in a working session in Quebec, Canada, on June 8. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States and Europe Still Need Each Other

In the run-up to the G-7 summit, Trump seemed to forget a key lesson from history.

Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr attends the demonstration against the western bombings of Syria, which he called for, on april 15, 2018, in Najaf. (HAIDAR HAMDANI/AFP/Getty Images)

Iraq’s Top 10 Potential Prime Ministers

Will it be the Harvard- and MIT-educated mandarin, the coveralls-wearing man of the people — or someone else the world has never heard of?

U.S. President Donald Trump in the White House after announcing his decision to leave the Iran nuclear deal on May 8. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Will the End of the Iran Deal Mark the Beginning of an Iran Strategy?

The time is ripe for a U.S. approach based on pushing Iranian domestic politics into crisis.

A member of the Iraqi security forces after voting in Baghdad on May 10. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

As Iraq Goes to the Polls, the U.S. and Iran Hang Back

For the first time since the military defeat of the Islamic State, Iraqis are voting for a new parliament. And Tehran and Washington aren’t getting in the way.

A torn up campaign poster for Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, for the upcoming parliamentary elections in the capital of the northern Iraqi Kurdish autonomous region Arbil. (SAFIN HAMED / AFP)

Welcome to Iraq’s First Post-Sectarian Election

Iraqi politicians are finally crossing ethnic and religious lines. But how long can the good vibes last?

A Turkish tank on a hilltop overlooking the Turkey-Syria border on Oct. 9, 2014. (Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

When Diplomacy Disappears

The Trump Administration’s lack of engagement has made the terrorist threat worse.

A U.S. convoy of armored vehicles on the outskirts of the Syrian city of Manbij on March 5, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Iranian-Backed Militias Set Sights on U.S. Forces

Airstrikes against Syria may galvanize support against the United States.

Chris Gash illustration for Foreign Policy

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.

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