Ireland

Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street on Nov. 14, 2018 in London, England.

Theresa May’s Last Dash for a Deal

The British prime minister wins minor concessions in an 11th-hour effort to save Brexit—and her premiership.

A 'Leave Means Leave' sticker on Westminster Bridge near the Houses of Parliament on Jan. 18, in London, England. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Will Brexit Blow Up Britain’s Conservative Party?

Europe has ended the careers of many a Tory prime minister. If Theresa May can’t forge a deal that carries a majority, she could send the party into the political wilderness.

Protesters attend an anti-government demonstration in support of abortion rights in Warsaw on April 9, 2016.

Poland Is Trying to Make Abortion Dangerous, Illegal, and Impossible

Ireland voted to liberalize abortion laws. The far-right government in Warsaw is moving in the opposite direction.

People celebrate the results of the Irish referendum to overturn the country’s abortion ban in Dublin on May 26, 2018. (Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

A Jury of Peers

How Ireland used a Citizens’ Assembly to solve some of its toughest problems.

Conservative member of Parliament Jacob Rees-Mogg speaks to the media after submitting a letter of no confidence in Prime Minister Theresa May  on November 15, 2018 in London.

Will the Tories Sacrifice Theresa May to Survive?

Britain’s prime minister is fighting a three-front battle to save her Brexit deal. Most of the party claims to support her, but the prospect of losing power to Jeremy Corbyn might motivate Conservatives to replace their leader.

British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on November 16, 2018.

The Brexit Deal Won’t Destroy Britain

Theresa May’s proposed deal with the European Union won’t put Jeremy Corbyn in power, but it might cost the prime minister her job.

British Prime Minister Theresa May and Arlene Foster, the leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) visit Belleek Pottery, on July 19, 2018 in St Belleek, Northern Ireland. (Clodagh Kilcoyne - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

The Democratic Unionist Party Isn’t Bluffing on Brexit. It’s Being ‘Thran.’

The small Northern Irish party that props up the British government has a history of belligerence and brinkmanship. But ultimately it will blink.

Britain's Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, gestures to the crowd not to cheer him before he speaks during a rally in central London on May 12, 2018.

Jeremy Corbyn Has a Soft Spot for Extremists

The British Labour leader misses no opportunity to condemn the West, but he’s full of praise for violent revolutionaries.

British Prime Minister Theresa May looks back as she and other leaders depart at a summit of leaders of the European Union on September 20, 2018 in Salzburg, Austria.

Theresa May’s Government Is Steering Britain Toward an Iceberg

The Conservative Party's negotiating strategy is premised on telling the EU one thing and British voters another. Doublespeak won't deliver a deal; it will lead to economic and political disaster.

DUBLIN, IRELAND - AUGUST 26:  People gather for the Closing Mass in Phoenix Park on August 26, 2018 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Pope Francis Can’t Redeem Irish Catholicism

If the Church doesn't embrace the people's demand for change, it'll wither away.

A mural in Dublin's city center by art group Subset calls to Repeal the 8th ahead May 25 ahead of the successful referendum to overturn the 8th Amendment of the Irish Constitution, which bans abortion. Brian Lawless/Press Association via AP

How Ireland Beat Dark Ads

Shady tactics failed to pay off in a divisive abortion referendum.

Pedestrians pass a billboard urging a 'no' vote in the referendum to preserve the eighth amendment of the Irish constitution in Dublin on May 13, 2018.

Ireland’s Nasty No Campaign

Anti-abortion activists are deploying every imaginable scare tactic to defeat a referendum that would grant Irish women the right to choose.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 26: Britain's Prime Minister, Theresa May (C-L), greets Arlene Foster, the leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (C-R), deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, Nigel Dodds (L) and DUP MP Jeffrey Donaldson (R) as they arrive in Downing Street on June 26, 2017 in London, England. Mrs Foster has said a deal between her party and the Conservatives to support a minority government is close. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

Britain Has New Northern Ireland Troubles

The British are angry that their new government is forcing them to be reminded of a part of their country they’d prefer to ignore.

BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - JUNE 09: DUP leader and Northern Ireland former First Minister Arlene Foster (C) holds a brief press conference with the DUP's newly elected Westminster candidates who stood in the general election on June 9, 2017 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. After a snap election was called by Prime Minister Theresa May the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday. The closely fought election has failed to return a clear overall majority winner and a hung parliament has been declared. Arlene Foster and the Democratic Unionist party with their ten Westminster seats have today stated that they will back Theresa May and the Conservatives in a prop up goverment. The two parties will continue talks about the finer details of the arrangement. (Photo by Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)

Will Theresa May’s Coalition Bring New Troubles to Northern Ireland?

Hard-line unionist politics and a resurgent Sinn Fein are butting heads in Belfast. But with the DUP as kingmaker in Westminster, things could get really ugly.

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Irish PM Kenny Meets Trump Ahead of St. Patrick’s Day

Kenny raises issue of undocumented Irish, Pence recalls his Irish grandfather.

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Oh, So Now You Want to Go to Ireland?

It's becoming increasingly difficult to move away from the rising far-right.

An apple logo sit on a sign at Apple Inc.'s campus in Cork, Ireland, on Tuesday, June 4, 2013. Speaking to lawmakers in Dublin last month, Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan insisted the country is no tax haven, after a congressional hearing in Washington focused attention on Apple Inc.'s maneuvers to minimize its tax bill through its operations in Cork in the south of Ireland. Photographer: Aidan Crawley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Life in Apple’s Ireland

The strange nature of living in a tax haven, where 26 percent GDP growth is accompanied by austerity and a homelessness crisis.

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Europe Says Apple Owes More than $14 Billion in Unpaid Taxes

European authorities allege Apple paid less than 1 percent on some of its profits.

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Microsoft Wins Closely Watched Email Privacy Case Over Feds

Federal agents can't get access to emails stored overseas, court rules.

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The Brexit Could Be Bad News for ‘Game of Thrones’

The European Union helps fund production of HBO’s epic in Northern Ireland. If the U.K. leaves, that money could too.

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