ISIS

Iraqi men flash the victory gesture from inside a car during the Hashed Shaabi (Popular Mobilisation) paramilitary forces' celebrations marking the first anniversary of victory over the Islamic State (IS) group on December 10, 2018. (Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images)

Start Small to Stop the Next ISIS

One year on from the defeat of the Islamic State, the new U.S. Congress should draw on lessons learned from efforts to counter violent extremism.

Herto Hamrash Minut, 74, sits outside his house on Sinjar Mountain, where he lives with his two wives and 12 children. Four years ago, he was kidnapped and tortured by the Islamic State for eight months. (Sam Mednick for Foreign Policy)

ISIS May Be Gone, But Iraq’s Yazidis Are Still Suffering

The defeat of the Islamic State has created a power vacuum in the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar, leaving the Yazidi minority at the mercy of competing militias.

Demonstrators gather outside a deradicalization center in Pontourny, France, the country's first Center for Prevention, Integration, and Citizenship on February 11, 2017 during a protest demanding its closure.

Want to Deradicalize Terrorists? Treat Them Like Everyone Else.

Many counter-extremism efforts falter because ideological reform programs run by governments lack credibility. Appealing to the basic psychological needs of ex-radicals is more promising.

Iraqi protesters watch an official building in flames as they demonstrate against the government and the lack of basic services in Basra on Sept. 6. (Haidar Hohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

Northern Iraq May Be Free, but the South Is Seething

The world has focused on rebuilding the country’s north after defeating the Islamic State while ignoring festering resentment and poverty in Basra.

U.S. forces, accompanied by the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), drive armored vehicles near the northern Syrian village of Darbasiyah on April 28, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S.-Turkish Ties May Be Cut for Good in Syria

The two countries are trying to work together in Manbij, and it isn’t going well.

An arrested woman appears before Iraqi judges in a makeshift courtroom in Baghdad on April 17. (Afshin Ismaeli/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Iraq Is Tempting Fate by Punishing Women

The country isn't just flouting international law by collectively punishing the wives of Islamic State fighters—it's inviting a return to war.

A picture shows a mural depicting the emblem of the Islamic State in Hawija, Iraq, on Oct. 5, 2017. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS’s New Plans to Get Rich and Wreak Havoc

The terrorist organization has lost almost all its territory but has found new ways to make vast sums of money.

U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan's Nangarhar Province on July 7. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Needs an Afghanistan Exit Strategy

Washington should hand over U.S. military and political roles to other countries, including China.

Tourists and Tunisians take part in a ceremony on July 3, 2015, in memory of those killed the previous week by a jihadist gunman in front of the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis. (Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

The Fight Against Terror Needs Better Data

The case of Tunisia shows that the anger of disappointed middle-class youths is driving radicalization more than poverty or unemployment.

Syrian rebel fighters in the northern countryside of Idlib province on Sept. 11. (Aaref Warad/AFP/Getty Images)

Turkey and the United States Should Work Together to Avert Disaster in Idlib

Despite their differences, Trump and Erodgan share an interest in avoiding a new humanitarian catastrophe in Syria.

A firing line of Syrian Democratic Forces soldiers take aim and fire at targets during a marksmanship training exercise to prepare for Operation Roundup, an SDF-led campaign to clear the last Islamic State strongholds, near Shaddadi, Syria, on May 27. (Staff Sgt. Timothy R. Koster/U.S. Army)

U.S.-led Coalition Set to Launch Final Fight Against ISIS in Syria

The jihadi group has lost nearly all its territory but is still seen as a threat.

Lior Raz, right, and Doron Ben-David play undercover Israeli operatives in Fauda, now available on Netflix. (Netflix)

The Occupation as Entertainment

The second season of the acclaimed TV thriller “Fauda” obscures the dark realities of Israeli rule in the West Bank.

U.S. forces near the northern Syrian village of Darbasiyah on April 28, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Three Months After U.S. Freeze, Syrian Recovery Stuck in Limbo

Short on funding, U.S. and European programs designed to help rebuild after the Islamic State are faltering.

Children working as street hawkers at a bazaar in western Kabul say their biggest fears are “terrorist attacks”
where they work and kidnappings. (Preethi Nallu/Samuel Hall)

Children Are Paying the Price for Afghanistan’s Endless War

As schools become targets, young Afghans are living and working on the streets — and the government isn’t doing much to protect them.

Iraqis celebrate with a picture of the Shiite cleric, Muqtada al-Sadr, after the general election in Baghdad on May 14, 2018.

I Fought Against Muqtada al-Sadr. Now He’s Iraq’s Best Hope.

The former militia leader who once terrorized U.S. forces has reinvented himself as an Iraqi nationalist and a pragmatist.

A member of the Iraqi security forces after voting in Baghdad on May 10. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

As Iraq Goes to the Polls, the U.S. and Iran Hang Back

For the first time since the military defeat of the Islamic State, Iraqis are voting for a new parliament. And Tehran and Washington aren’t getting in the way.

A Turkish tank on a hilltop overlooking the Turkey-Syria border on Oct. 9, 2014. (Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

When Diplomacy Disappears

The Trump Administration’s lack of engagement has made the terrorist threat worse.

A U.S. convoy of armored vehicles on the outskirts of the Syrian city of Manbij on March 5, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Iranian-Backed Militias Set Sights on U.S. Forces

Airstrikes against Syria may galvanize support against the United States.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing on Syria in the White House on April 9. From left: U.S. Army Chief of Staff Mark Milley, Vice President Mike Pence, Trump, and National Security Advisor John Bolton. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Trump’s Passive-Aggressive Syria Policy Risks Creating More Mayhem in the Middle East

The United States is pursuing a worst-of-both-worlds mix of hawkish confrontation and strategic retrenchment.

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