Kim Jong-un

Then-North Korean leader Kim Jong Il meets then-U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright during her visit to Pyongyang on Oct. 24, 2000.  (Photo credit: Chien-min Chung/AFP/Getty Images)

Decades of U.S. Diplomacy With North Korea: a Timeline

Trump's potential meeting with Kim Jong Un follows decades of mostly failed U.S. talks with the Hermit Kingdom.

North Koreans attend a mass rally in Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang on Dec. 1, 2017. (Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Needs to Get Serious About Human Rights in North Korea

More than 20 million North Koreans have their human dignity trampled upon daily. The United States should do more for them.

North Korea's all-female Moranbong band perform in Pyongyang on May 11, 2016. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

How a Girl Band May Unify Korea

How to solve the Korean crisis through the power of kitschy, hyperpatriotic pop music.

A South Korean government official checks the direct communications hotline to talk with the North Korean side at the border village of Panmunjom on Jan. 3, in Panmunjom, South Korea. (South Korean Unification Ministry via Getty Images)

What’s a Nuclear Hotline Good For Anyway?

North and South Korea have revived their dormant direct line. That’s good news for the rest of the world.

U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers flying with F-35B fighter jets and South Korean Air Force F-15K fighter jets on September 18, 2017 in Gangwon-do, South Korea. (Getty Images)

It’s Time to Bomb North Korea

Destroying Pyongyang’s nuclear arsenal is still in America’s national interest.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley votes during a U.N. Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters in New York City on Dec. 22. (Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images)

U.N. Votes For New Sanctions Against North Korea

North Koreans working abroad are a source of cash. They won’t be anymore.

South Korean policemen participate in an anti-terror drill at the Olympic Staduim, venue of the Opening and Closing ceremony on Dec. 12, in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Will North Korea Blow Up the Winter Olympics?

It’s possible. But here are a few steps Washington, Seoul, and Pyongyang can take to keep the 2018 Winter Games peaceful.

This picture from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) released on Aug. 30 shows North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 lifting off at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Your Apocalyptic Fantasies Aren’t Helping the North Korea Crisis

Stop speculating about nuclear war, and start asking these six questions about the Trump administration’s policies toward Pyongyang.

US President Donald Trump listen as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (out of frame) speaks at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, on February 11, 2017, after North Korea reportedly fired a ballistic missile, the first since Donald Trump became US president. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Needs a Diplomatic Surge for North Korea

The White House’s policy of maximum pressure is having precisely the wrong effect.

TOPSHOT - This picture from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) taken on August 29, 2017 and released on August 30, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (C) watching the launch of an intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang.
Nuclear-armed North Korea said on August 30 that it had fired a missile over Japan the previous day, the first time it has ever acknowledged doing so. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIA KNS / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT   ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP.  / The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by STR has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang] instead of [in Pyongyang]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.        (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

U.N. Report: Sanctions Aren’t Stopping North Korea’s Nuclear Program

The U.S. campaign to hammer North Korean sanctions-busters is turning into an international game of whack-a-mole.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during the Dialogue of Emerging Market and Developing Countries on the sidelines of the 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, southeastern China's Fujian Province on September 5, 2017.
Xi opened the annual summit of BRICS leaders that already has been upstaged by North Korea's latest nuclear weapons provocation. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / WU HONG        (Photo credit should read WU HONG/AFP/Getty Images)

A Nuclear Slap in China’s Face

Kim Jong Un has caused Xi Jinping to lose face. What will China do about it?

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