Kim Jong-un

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, speaks with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, left, at the Peace House in Panmunjom, South Korea, on April 27. (Korea Summit Press Pool/Getty Images)

Don’t Overestimate the Power of Historic Summits

The potential for progress on the Korean Peninsula is real, but the pitfalls are plentiful.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Panmunjom, South Korea, on April 27. (Korea Summit Press Pool/AFP/Getty Images)

Pyongyang Is Playing Washington and Seoul

Hollow summits between North Korea, South Korea, and the United States only serve to benefit the North.

A South Korean soldier walks past a television displaying images of U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a railway station in Seoul on March 9. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Should Do His Nuke Deal Homework

The Iran nuclear accord contains lessons for talks with North Korea.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves from his train as it prepares to depart from Beijing railway station. (-/AFP/Getty Images)

Did Kim’s Visit Just Hand China a Trump Card?

An unannounced visit boosted both Beijing’s and Pyongyang’s leverage in negotiations, but Washington still seems to have no plan.

Then-North Korean leader Kim Jong Il meets then-U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright during her visit to Pyongyang on Oct. 24, 2000.  (Photo credit: Chien-min Chung/AFP/Getty Images)

Decades of U.S. Diplomacy With North Korea: a Timeline

Trump's potential meeting with Kim Jong Un follows decades of mostly failed U.S. talks with the Hermit Kingdom.

North Koreans attend a mass rally in Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang on Dec. 1, 2017. (Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Needs to Get Serious About Human Rights in North Korea

More than 20 million North Koreans have their human dignity trampled upon daily. The United States should do more for them.

North Korea's all-female Moranbong band perform in Pyongyang on May 11, 2016. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

How a Girl Band May Unify Korea

How to solve the Korean crisis through the power of kitschy, hyperpatriotic pop music.

A South Korean government official checks the direct communications hotline to talk with the North Korean side at the border village of Panmunjom on Jan. 3, in Panmunjom, South Korea. (South Korean Unification Ministry via Getty Images)

What’s a Nuclear Hotline Good For Anyway?

North and South Korea have revived their dormant direct line. That’s good news for the rest of the world.

U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers flying with F-35B fighter jets and South Korean Air Force F-15K fighter jets on September 18, 2017 in Gangwon-do, South Korea. (Getty Images)

It’s Time to Bomb North Korea

Destroying Pyongyang’s nuclear arsenal is still in America’s national interest.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley votes during a U.N. Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters in New York City on Dec. 22. (Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images)

U.N. Votes For New Sanctions Against North Korea

North Koreans working abroad are a source of cash. They won’t be anymore.

South Korean policemen participate in an anti-terror drill at the Olympic Staduim, venue of the Opening and Closing ceremony on Dec. 12, in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Will North Korea Blow Up the Winter Olympics?

It’s possible. But here are a few steps Washington, Seoul, and Pyongyang can take to keep the 2018 Winter Games peaceful.

This picture from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) released on Aug. 30 shows North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 lifting off at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Your Apocalyptic Fantasies Aren’t Helping the North Korea Crisis

Stop speculating about nuclear war, and start asking these six questions about the Trump administration’s policies toward Pyongyang.

US President Donald Trump listen as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (out of frame) speaks at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, on February 11, 2017, after North Korea reportedly fired a ballistic missile, the first since Donald Trump became US president. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Needs a Diplomatic Surge for North Korea

The White House’s policy of maximum pressure is having precisely the wrong effect.

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