kosovo

Supporters of Russian President Vladimir Putin wait for his arrival in front of Belgrade's Saint Sava Church on January 17, 2019.

There’s One Country in Europe Where Putin Is a Rock Star

The Russian president’s visit to Serbia was a lovefest—but beyond the odes to Orthodox brotherhood, the two authoritarian leaders are using one another to advance a geopolitical agenda.

People gather to celebrate the return of the formerly banned anti-government group the Oromo Liberation Front at Mesquel Square in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on Sept. 15, 2018.

Don’t Let Ethiopia Become the Next Yugoslavia

Federations of ethnonational states can become explosive during moments of political liberalization. Abiy Ahmed must tread carefully to avoid a Balkan nightmare.

(Illustration by Joan Wong for Foreign Policy; photos by U.S. Navy/ Roger Lemoyne/Getty Images/Charlie Archambalt/Getty Images/Couple/Globalphoto.com/Liaison/Getty Images)

The Small War That Wasn’t

Why the Kosovo conflict still matters today.

A Kosovar police officer walks past burning logs as Kosovo Albanians gather around a barricade blocking access to a village due to be visited by the Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, on the main road between Mitrovica, in the north of Kosovo, and the village of Banje, a Serbian enclave on Sept. 9.

Partition in Kosovo Will Lead to Disaster

Ill-advised land swaps and population transfers won’t bring peace. They’re more likely to revive the bloodshed that plagued the Balkans during the 1990s.

Kosovo-Albanian waves an Albanian and a American flag when he ride a horse during the celebration of Kosovo's expected declaration of independence on February 16, 2008 in  Pristina, Kosov. (Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

How to Restart War in the Balkans

The Trump administration will regret looking for simple solutions to Eastern Europe's territorial disputes.

Montenegrin Army soldiers fire artillery look at the Montenegro flag during preparations on the eve of Independence day, on May 20, 2010 in Cetinje, Montenegro.

A Russian Attack on Montenegro Could Mean the End of NATO

Trump doesn’t think the country is worth defending. Putin has already tried to destabilize it once—the West can’t let it happen again.

Flags with the logo and the World Cup 2018 mascot Zabivaka are seen in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow on June 30, 2018 during the Russia 2018 World Cup football tournament. (Photo by Vasily MAXIMOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of the 2018 World Cup

War is politics by other means — and so is the World Cup.

Swiss winger Xherdan Shaqiri celebrates after scoring the winning goal in the 2018 World Cup match between Serbia and Switzerland at Kaliningrad Stadium on June 22. (Clive Rose/Getty Images)

For Serbs, Switzerland Isn’t Neutral

Serbia’s nationalist soccer fans hoped to restore their national pride by beating a Swiss team led by Kosovar stars. Instead, the Kosovo-born Xherdan Shaqiri handed them a humiliating defeat.

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.