kurdistan

Turkish-backed Syrian fighters patrol the northern Syrian Kurdish town of Tal Abyad on the border with Turkey on Oct. 31.

The Kurds Are the Nation-State’s Latest Victims

The global order has been stuck with states since 1648. It’s time to move on.

Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran meets U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

The Secret Origins of the U.S.-Kurdish Relationship Explain Today’s Disaster

The seeds of Washington’s abandonment of the Kurds traces back to a classified document written in the 1970s by Henry Kissinger.

A woman sits in front of the tomb a Syrian Democratic Forces fighter.

An Angry Congress Prepares to Rebuke Trump Over Kurds

Lawmakers expect to get a veto-proof majority backing sanctions against Turkey.

Workers install electric wires at the Khazir refugee camp west of Erbil on Nov. 21, 2016.

How to Keep the Lights on in Kurdistan

Caught between the United States and Iran, Iraq is facing deep energy insecurity. In Kurdistan, the solution may be solar power.

Herto Hamrash Minut, 74, sits outside his house on Sinjar Mountain, where he lives with his two wives and 12 children. Four years ago, he was kidnapped and tortured by the Islamic State for eight months. (Sam Mednick for Foreign Policy)

ISIS May Be Gone, But Iraq’s Yazidis Are Still Suffering

The defeat of the Islamic State has created a power vacuum in the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar, leaving the Yazidi minority at the mercy of competing militias.

Massoud Barzani, a leader of the Kurdish Democratic Party, in Iraq's Nineveh province in Nov. 2015. (Reza/Getty Images)

This Is Where Iran Defeats the United States

Iraq’s Kurdish kingmakers used to side with Washington. Now, Tehran seems like a more attractive partner.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan arrives to deliver a speech with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto (out of frame) at the National Palace in Mexico City on February 12, 2015. Erdogan is in Mexico for a two-day official visit.  AFP PHOTO/ Yuri CORTEZ / AFP PHOTO / Yuri CORTEZ        (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Turkey’s Double ISIS Standard

Ankara claims to oppose the Islamic State. Its actions suggest otherwise.

Mike Pompeo during his confirmation hearing to be CIA director in Washington on Jan. 12, 2017. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Here’s What the Senate Should Ask Mike Pompeo

Democratic foreign-policy veterans want answers from Trump’s pick for secretary of state.

People gather in Istanbul to support the Turkish government following a failed coup attempt on July 16, 2016. (Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Alliance With Turkey Is Worth Preserving

Ankara is a difficult friend. That doesn't mean the United States should cut it loose.

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu and U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speak in a press conference in Ankara, Turkey on Feb. 16, 2018. (Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images)

Tillerson Can’t Fix What Ails U.S. Ties With Turkey

The Trump administration’s not-so-charm offensive may have steered U.S.-Turkey relations away from the brink of collapse. That’s no cause for a victory lap just yet.

A woman reads names on a commemorative plaque during a memorial ceremony for victims of an Islamic State attack at Istanbul's Ataturk airport, on June 28, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan’s Fatal Blind Spot

The real threat to Turkey isn’t the Kurds. It’s the Islamic State.

Turkish tanks pass front of a giant poster of Recep Tayyip Erdogan on August 30,2014 in Istanbul. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

General Erdogan’s First War

Turkey’s Islamist president is the first civilian with control over his country’s military – and you can tell by the results.

Vladimir Putin walks near a new Russian fighter jet Sukhoi T-50 on June 17, 2010. (ALEXEY DRUZHININ/AFP/Getty Images)

Vladimir Putin’s ‘Mission Accomplished’ Moment

Russia's highly-touted peace conference to end the war in Syria was an utter debacle.

Turkish army tanks gather close to the Syrian border on January 21, 2018 at Hassa, in Hatay province.

How to Stop the War Between Turkey and the Syrian Kurds

Fighting between two vital U.S. allies will only strengthen Assad and Iran.

A Turkish tank on the Syrian-Turkish border on Aug. 25, 2016. (Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

Turkey Wants to Crush U.S. Allies in Syria. That Shouldn’t Surprise Anybody.

America’s partners are at each other’s throats, and Washington doesn’t have a plan to pull them apart.

Supporters wave flags as they wait for Masoud Barzani’s arrival during a rally in Erbil, Iraq, on Sept. 22, 2017, for the independence referendum later that month. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Twilight of the Kurds

Kurdish officials once dreamed of forging their own state out of the ashes of the war against the Islamic State. Now they are fighting for their very survival.

Then-Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the G-20 opening ceremony in Hangzhou, China on Sep. 4, 2016. (Nicolas Asfouri/Pool/Getty Images)

Tehran Is Winning the War for Control of the Middle East

And there’s no indication that, despite Mohammed bin Salman’s bold moves, Saudi Arabia stands a chance of turning the tide.

The insignia of the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) on a member's uniform in al-Karamah, Syria on May 10. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kurdish Explosion Is Unleashing Demons

The United States needs to put a stop to this flashpoint before it’s too late.

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