Latin America

A man and his family walk past closed vegetable stalls.

The Coronavirus Could Topple Governments Around the World

The coronavirus pandemic might not disrupt politics in wealthy Western democracies, but it is likely to unleash political instability—and even regime change—in developing countries already suffering from an economic crisis.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Russian President Vladimir Putin, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro attend the 11th BRICS Summit in Brasilia, Brazil, on Nov. 14, 2019.

The Coronavirus Is the Biggest Emerging Markets Crisis Ever

The pandemic is starting to topple one of the pillars of the globalization era.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani greets Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro

Iran May Be Eyeing the United States’ Soft Underbelly

When Iran takes revenge for the killing of Qassem Suleimani, history suggests it could happen in Latin America.

Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg

No, Pete Buttigieg Is Not a CIA Asset

The agency’s history of bloody-handed bungling abroad has come back to haunt U.S. politics.

Venezuelan migrant Johan Castillo receives cakes on his birthday from members of the Red Cross in Bucaramanga, Colombia, on Dec. 17, 2019.

Could Venezuela’s Loss Be Latin America’s Gain?

The world’s second-largest refugee crisis could change North and South America for the better, but host countries can’t shoulder the burden without international help.

A protester walks past barricades in Haiti.

10 Important Stories You Might Have Missed in 2019

China’s designs in space, a drought crisis in southern Africa, and other stories you may have missed during this year’s chaotic and nonstop news cycle.

Students attend a rally at Edinburgh Place in Hong Kong on Aug. 22.

2019: A Year of Global Protest

Even as right-wing forces took hold in many places around the world, grassroots democracy proved itself alive and well.

A supporter of former Bolivian President Evo Morales

Evo Morales’s Chaotic Departure Won’t Define His Legacy

History won’t remember him for the ongoing unrest, but for the enfranchisement of Bolivia’s indigenous population.

Bolivia's interim President Jeanine Áñez (center) speaks during a press conference at the presidential palace.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Uncertainty in Bolivia after the resignation of President Evo Morales, a resurgence of Iraqi nationalism challenges long-term U.S. interests, and the United States is using diplomacy to crack into Greenland.

Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra (right) shakes hands with his Bolivian counterpart, Evo Morales, during their fifth joint staff meeting in Peru on June 25.

Latin America Is Too Polarized to Help Stabilize Bolivia

Riven by ideological divisions and facing a lack of adequate regional mechanisms, neighboring countries cannot even agree on whether Evo Morales’s ouster constitutes a coup.

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales speaks during a press conference after being granted asylum in Mexico City on Nov. 13.

Who Wants to Be the Next Former President of Bolivia?

Evo Morales’s successor faces an unenviable set of challenges to stabilize the country.

A technician extracts blood from a patient for an HIV test in Mexico City on July 18.

Mexico Is Setting a Global Example on HIV Treatment

But the president’s recent funding cuts to civil society organizations threaten to imperil their progress.

Then-Bolivian President Evo Morales speaks at a press conference in La Paz, Bolivia, on Oct. 24.

Why Is Evo Morales Suddenly No Longer President of Bolivia?

The ousted leader is calling it a “coup,” but he entered dangerous legal territory in pushing for an unprecedented fourth term.

West German schoolchildren on the way to school peer at East German border guards at a new opening in the Berlin Wall

Our Top Weekend Reads

The world marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Hezbollah is stuck between the establishment and the protesters, and Palestinian Israelis wield newfound political power.

A demonstrator waves a Chilean flag at a barricade during a protest against the government's economic policies in Santiago on Oct. 29.

Latin America’s Protests Are Likely to Fail

The popular uprisings in Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, and Haiti have many different causes and one thing in common: If history is any indicator, the outlook for genuine, lasting change is grim.

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