Latin America

Jair Bolsonaro, the president-elect of Brazil, casts his vote in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28. (Ricardo Moraes-Pool/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro Can’t Destroy Brazilian Democracy

Brazil’s new president is a throwback to its authoritarian past—but the country is more resilient than it used to be.

Demonstrators take part in a protest against Brazilian right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 20. (Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

How Women Could Win It for Bolsonaro

Brazil’s far-right presidential front-runner made hateful comments a hallmark of his political life. That hasn’t held him back.

A supporter of Brazil's far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a rally in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 21. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Just the Right That’s Voting for Bolsonaro. It’s Everyone.

Brazil’s populist firebrand is relying on conservative values, fear of crime, anger about corruption, and rampant fake news to gain support from across the political spectrum.

Brazilian far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro talks to the press in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 25. (Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

Investors Love Bolsonaro. Can He Deliver?

Markets are soaring ahead of Brazil’s runoff election—on what may turn out to be mere wishful thinking.

Far-right Brazilian presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro at a press conference in Rio de Janeiro on Oct 11. (Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images)

The Sad Decline of Brazil’s Political Establishment

Voters are manifesting their profound unhappiness with the status quo. Jair Bolsonaro is the result.

Jair Bolsonaro looks on during a press conference he called to announce his intention to run for the Brazilian presidency in the October 2018 election, in Rio de Janeiro on August 10, 2017. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images)

Jair Bolsonaro’s Model Isn’t Berlusconi. It’s Goebbels.

The far-right Brazilian leader isn’t just another conservative populist. His propaganda campaign has taken a page straight from the Nazi playbook.

Activists in favor of the legalization of abortion dressed as characters from "The Handmaid's Tale" protest in Buenos Aires, on August 5, 2018. (Alejandro Pagni/AFP/Getty Images)

Latin America’s Rights Riddle

Why the region says yes to same-sex marriage and no to abortion.

Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega (L) delivers a speech beside Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo (R), president of the National Commission for Verification, Reconciliation, Peace and Justice of the Sandinista government, on November 03, 2008 in Managua. (MIGUEL ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

How a Nicaraguan Priest Made a Deal With the Devil

Catholic clerics have been on the frontlines protesting Daniel Ortega's bloody crackdown—but one of them also helped fuel his rise.

Peruvian players huddle prior before the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between Australia and Peru at Fisht Stadium on June 26 in Sochi, Russia. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

Peru’s National Identity Was Bound Up With Conflict and Corruption for Decades — Then It Qualified for the World Cup.

On our podcast, how a country scores two goals in the soccer tournament and finds redemption.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador gestures after voting during general elections, in Mexico City, on July 1, 2018.

López Obrador Is a Pragmatist, Not an Ideologue

Don’t expect Mexico’s new president to radically shift the country’s approach to foreign policy.

Anti-government demonstrators hold a protest demanding Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, to stand down, in Managua on May 26, 2018.

Can Nicaragua’s Military Prevent a Civil War?

President Daniel Ortega’s crackdown on protests has driven the country to the brink. If the violence escalates, it could spark a refugee crisis and destabilize all of Central America.

Mexican President Elect Andres Manuel López Obrador speaks after his electoral victory, Mexico City, Mexico, Jul. 1, 2018. (Pedro Mera/Getty Images)

Mexico’s Populist New President Unlikely to Derail Energy Reform

López Obrador won’t reverse the country’s historic oil opening — but he won’t expand it, either.

Venezuelan opposition leader Maria Corina Machado (C) takes part in a women's march in Caracas on May 6, 2017.

Don’t Let Venezuela’s Government Smear the Opposition’s Brightest Star

Maduro’s autocratic regime is going after María Corina Machado because she is fearless and incorruptible. She needs Washington’s support.

A supporter of Sen. Bernie Sanders yells at a Trump supporter at MLK Jr. Park on Aug. 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California. (Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

America’s Uncivil Protests Are Straight Out of Latin America

Donald Trump’s domestic critics are following South America’s successful anti-strongman playbook.

Brazilian congressman and presidential candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, waves to the crowd during a military event in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 3, 2018.

Latin America’s Center Cannot Hold If It Doesn’t Exist

Mainstream establishment parties across the continent have been replaced by populists offering easy and empty answers.

A child at the U.S.-Mexico fence in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on April 4. (Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Playing Chicken With Children’s Lives

The U.S. child welfare system is strained to its limits. Family separation could push it over the edge.

Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro at a press conference in Bogotá on June 14. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Hugo Chávez Is Haunting Colombia’s Election

Some Colombians fear that their country could go the way of Venezuela.

A supporter of Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro for the Colombia Humana Party holds a poster during a campaign rally in Cali, Colombia, on June 9, (Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

Peace Pact in the Balance As Colombians Vote

Sunday’s election is widely seen as a referendum on the historic peace accord with the FARC.

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