Latin America

Residents of the Galápagos Islands hold a demonstration outside the court where the crew of a Chinese-flagged ship confiscated by the Ecuadorian Navy is attending a hearing, on Aug. 25, 2017.

China’s Hunger for Seafood Is Now Latin America’s Problem

Massively in debt to Beijing, countries in the region can’t stand up to China to protect their coasts.

An aerial view shows graves in the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, on July 20.

Brazil’s First Wave Isn’t Over Yet

Coronavirus cases are spiking again in the country’s north, threatening to increase strain on public hospitals. This time, local governments face even more political pressure to lift restrictions.

chile-FACHO-fascism-pinochet-MAURO-ANDRÉS-illustration-02

In Chile, One Word Defines the Political Revolution

The Chilean term “facho” evokes the image of Chile’s fascist past—but also of present-day tenacity that thumbs its nose at institutional power.

A man holds his child inside a malnutrition ward supported by the World Food Programme at Al-Sabeen hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, on Oct. 10.

A U.N. Agency Lauded for Its Work Faces a Funding Shortage

The World Food Program will need more than a Nobel Prize to feed the millions who are newly food-insecure.

Demonstrators hold flags with the face of former president Evo Morales during a Movement for Socialism closing rally ahead of presidential elections in El Alto, Bolivia, on Oct. 14.

Will Bolivia’s Elections Usher in a New Wave of Socialism in Latin America?

A year after the leftist leader fled La Paz, Morales is looming over the upcoming vote.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo travels to Brazil.

Pompeo’s Preelection Politicking Is Wearing Thin, Even With Allies

From the Vatican to Brazil, foreign officials are getting tired of Pompeo dragging their governments into Trump’s reelection campaign.

Colombian President Iván Duque shakes hand with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo during the III Hemispheric Ministerial Conference of Fight Against Terrorism in Bogota, on Jan. 20, 2020.

Washington’s ‘Blind Eye’ Toward Human Rights Abuses in Latin America

Would a Biden administration put the swagger back into America’s championing of human rights in the region?

A nurse in Caracas passes an anti-imperialism mural

Latin America Is Off the Global Stage, and That’s OK

The region doesn’t have a seat at the geopolitical table, but at least it’s off the menu.

Mauricio Claver-Carone

Trump’s Candidate Would Be a Disaster for Latin America’s Bank

The Inter-American Development Bank has never been led by a U.S. citizen before.

Alicia Barcena, chief of the United Nations Economic Committee for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), attends a panel during the U.N. Global Compact for Migration in Marrakesh in 2018.

After COVID-19, Latin America Braces for ‘Lost Decade’

Already one of the most unequal regions in the world, it may face an unprecedented rise in inequality and poverty due to the economic carnage of the pandemic.

Ricardo Ospina, a journalist at Caracol TV, and Mauricio Claver-Carone, a senior director at the U.S. National Security Council, speak at the 2019 Concordia Americas Summit in Bogotá on May 14, 2019.

Latin America Won’t Give In to Trump Without a Fight

In the tussle over the Inter-American Development Bank, the region is prepared to wait him out.

Mauricio Claver-Carone​ attends the conversation 'Trump Administration Priorities in the Americas' at the 2019 Concordia Americas Summit in Bogota, Colombia, on May 14, 2019.

Trump’s Pick to Run Latin America’s Development Bank Is the Last Thing It Needed

Foisting a divisive, first-ever U.S. president on the Inter-American Development Bank will likely hinder—not help—the bank’s quest to raise cash during the coronavirus pandemic.

People protest against corruption in Lima on January 3, 2019.

How to Tackle Coronavirus Corruption

Latin American governments have a chance to model a better version of the inspector general, with even greater autonomy, to address graft in the public health sector.

A Chilean demonstrator holds a Mapuche Indigenous flag

Toppling Statues Isn’t Enough in Latin America

Rethinking the past is a tough challenge when colonial structures run deep.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks with French President Emmanuel Macron prior to the start of an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels on July 18.

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Beirut’s blast reopens old political wounds, why Europe must stand up for Belarus, and Colombian armed groups spread fear amid lockdown.

Children talk with soldiers in a municipality of Chocó, Colombia, on June 9, 2017. The area has grown used to the sight of heavily armed soldiers and continues to see swarms of villagers displaced by clashes between armed groups.

In Colombia, the Pandemic Provides Fertile Ground for Illegal Armed Groups

Criminal bands and fighters are capitalizing on fear to expand their control in vulnerable communities.

A volunteer disinfects an area inside Santa Marta Favela in Brazil

Latin America Can’t Survive the Coronavirus Crisis Alone

Countries are too rich to access conventional aid, but they can’t cope by themselves.

A health worker at Carrasco International Airport near Uruguay's capital, Montevideo

Uruguay Emerges as a Rare Pandemic Winner in Latin America

Despite the border with hard-hit Brazil, the coronavirus is well under control in the country.

Indian Malaria Fumigation

Malaria May Still Be 2020’s Biggest Killer

The coronavirus has shut down large-scale treatment and prevention programs around the globe, which could send malaria deaths skyrocketing this year.

Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega (left) and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif at a meeting in Managua on July 22, 2019.

Iran Is Working Hard to Revive Anti-U.S. Operations in Latin America

Reactivating old alliances in America’s soft underbelly is not as easy as it seems.