Latin America

Worshipers at an evangelical church in Brasília, Brazil, on Sept. 21, 2018, pray for the recovery of then-presidential contender Jair Bolsonaro after he was injured in a knife attack. (Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro’s Christian Coalition Remains Precarious

A loose alliance of Catholic and evangelical conservatives helped Brazil’s new president to power. But their continued support is far from certain.

Brazilian Judge Sergio Moro gestures as he leaves the house of Brazilian President-elect Jair Bolsonaro after a meeting, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on November 1, 2018. (MAURO PIMENTEL/AFP/Getty Images)

Judging Bolsonaro

Brazil’s judiciary will be a major check on the country’s far-right president-elect.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez addresses supporters during a campaign rally on August 3, 2012. (JUAN BARRETO/AFP/GettyImages)

Chávez’s Real Legacy Is Disaster

It's easy to blame Maduro, but the seeds of calamity were sown by his predecessor.

Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a press conference in Mexico City on Oct. 29. (Ulises Ruiz /AFP/Getty Images)

How Will AMLO Govern Mexico?

Mexico’s new president promises to fight corruption and inequality, but critics worry he’ll be the country’s Hugo Chávez.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton in the White House in Washington on Oct. 3.

Bolton Is Building a Confrontational Latin America Strategy

The Trump administration is right to call out the region’s rogues for their destabilizing behavior.

Jair Bolsonaro, the president-elect of Brazil, casts his vote in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28. (Ricardo Moraes-Pool/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro Can’t Destroy Brazilian Democracy

Brazil’s new president is a throwback to its authoritarian past—but the country is more resilient than it used to be.

Demonstrators take part in a protest against Brazilian right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 20. (Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

How Women Could Win It for Bolsonaro

Brazil’s far-right presidential front-runner made hateful comments a hallmark of his political life. That hasn’t held him back.

A supporter of Brazil's far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a rally in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 21. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Just the Right That’s Voting for Bolsonaro. It’s Everyone.

Brazil’s populist firebrand is relying on conservative values, fear of crime, anger about corruption, and rampant fake news to gain support from across the political spectrum.

Brazilian far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro talks to the press in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 25. (Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

Investors Love Bolsonaro. Can He Deliver?

Markets are soaring ahead of Brazil’s runoff election—on what may turn out to be mere wishful thinking.

Far-right Brazilian presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro at a press conference in Rio de Janeiro on Oct 11. (Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images)

The Sad Decline of Brazil’s Political Establishment

Voters are manifesting their profound unhappiness with the status quo. Jair Bolsonaro is the result.

Jair Bolsonaro looks on during a press conference he called to announce his intention to run for the Brazilian presidency in the October 2018 election, in Rio de Janeiro on August 10, 2017. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images)

Jair Bolsonaro’s Model Isn’t Berlusconi. It’s Goebbels.

The far-right Brazilian leader isn’t just another conservative populist. His propaganda campaign has taken a page straight from the Nazi playbook.

Activists in favor of the legalization of abortion dressed as characters from "The Handmaid's Tale" protest in Buenos Aires, on August 5, 2018. (Alejandro Pagni/AFP/Getty Images)

Latin America’s Rights Riddle

Why the region says yes to same-sex marriage and no to abortion.

Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega (L) delivers a speech beside Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo (R), president of the National Commission for Verification, Reconciliation, Peace and Justice of the Sandinista government, on November 03, 2008 in Managua. (MIGUEL ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

How a Nicaraguan Priest Made a Deal With the Devil

Catholic clerics have been on the frontlines protesting Daniel Ortega's bloody crackdown—but one of them also helped fuel his rise.

Peruvian players huddle prior before the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between Australia and Peru at Fisht Stadium on June 26 in Sochi, Russia. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

Peru’s National Identity Was Bound Up With Conflict and Corruption for Decades — Then It Qualified for the World Cup.

On our podcast, how a country scores two goals in the soccer tournament and finds redemption.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador gestures after voting during general elections, in Mexico City, on July 1, 2018.

López Obrador Is a Pragmatist, Not an Ideologue

Don’t expect Mexico’s new president to radically shift the country’s approach to foreign policy.

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