Latin America

Tourists visit La Clandestina, a private shop in Havana, on March 28, 2018. Entrepreneurs known as cuentapropistas and their employees represent 12 percent of the country’s work force—some 580,000 Cubans.

The End of Cuba’s Entrepreneurship Boom

It isn’t just Trump who has put the country’s small businesses under pressure. Díaz-Canel is after them, too.

Mexican National Guard members stand watch along the banks of the Suchiate River to prevent crossings to and from Tecun Uman in Guatemala, on July 3.

Guatemala Cancels on Trump

Plus: Iran says it will talk—if U.S. sanctions end, Italy presents a migration plan, and what to watch in the world this week.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is dealing with key defections—like Finance Minister Carlos Urzúa—just months into his term, on July 9.

Government Rift Deepens Mexico’s Economic Crisis

After months of rumors, the finance minister bitterly parts ways with the leftist president.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Fabiana Rosales de Guaidó, the wife of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó, in the White House on March 27.

Trump Should Not Forget Venezuela

Even with the eyes of the world elsewhere, here’s how Trump can keep up pressure on Maduro.

Calo Rosa for Foreign Policy

El Salvador’s Tough Policing Isn’t What It Looks Like

Shootings reported as enfrentamientos, or confrontations, often mask killings of civilians and other misconduct.

European Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom addresses a press conference in Brussels on Jan. 18.

While Trump Isolates the U.S., It’s ‘Let’s Make a Deal’ for the Rest of the World

Globalization is alive and well. It’s just the United States sitting on the sidelines.

A Guerrero community police member stands guard at an illegal poppy field in Heliodoro Castillo, Guerrero state, Mexico, on March 25, 2018.

When Poppies Don’t Pay

With a stark decline in the price fetched by opium gum, Mexico’s government should take strides toward making crop substitution proposals a reality in Guerrero.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally in the capital, Tehran, on May 10.

Trump’s Iran Crackdown Isn’t Enough to Stop Hezbollah

Unless Washington targets the group more effectively, it can outlive the pressure on Tehran.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador speaks at the National Palace in Mexico City on May 31.

Trump Starts a New Trade Fight in the Middle of an Old One

The end result could be a recession and a closer relationship between China and Mexico.

China's President Xi Jinping (second from left) and Panama's Juan Carlos Varela (second from right) wave flanked by first ladies Peng Liyuan (left) and Lorena Castillo (right) at the newly inaugurated Cocoli locks in the Panama Canal, on Dec. 3, 2018.

The Panama Canal Could Become the Center of the U.S.-China Trade War

Panama’s strategic and symbolic importance place it at the heart of growing trade tensions.

Cubans attend a May Day rally in Havana on May 1.

Trump’s Cuba Sanctions Are a Mistake

Tightening the failed embargo will push Havana into the arms of Beijing and Moscow.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó waves at his supporters during a demonstration at Avenida Francisco de Miranda on May 1 in Caracas.

Guaidó’s Plan for Venezuela Is in Limbo

The opposition leader’s call for Venezuelans to fill the streets and for the military to turn on the president has not yet brought about the change he seeks.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó arrives at a demonstration at Avenida Francisco de Miranda on May 1 in Caracas.

Will Guaidó’s Gamble Pay Off?

Venezuela’s opposition leader has failed to gain enough military support to oust Nicolás Maduro, and Washington’s policies aren’t helping him.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó, recognized by many countries including the United States as the country's rightful interim ruler, stands on top of a car surrounded by soldiers and civilians at Plaza Altamira in Caracas, Venezuela, on April 30.

Guaidó Is Stumbling Toward a Coup

Naunihal Singh, an expert on military takeovers, addresses what to watch as Venezuela's would-be president attempts to oust Maduro.

Honduran migrants protest outside the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City on April 12, 2018. (Alfre-do Estrella/AFP/Getty Images)The caravan, which prompted fury from US President Donald Trump, assembled on the border with Guatemala on March 25 but started breaking up in southern Mexico after organizers said it had abandoned its goal of reaching the US border and would end its activities with the rally in Mexico City. / AFP PHOTO / ALFREDO ESTRELLA        (Photo credit should read ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Senate is Hollowing Out the United States’ Diplomatic Corps

To protect U.S. national security, the United States needs to rethink the way the government approves diplomats.

Soldiers monitor a protest in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Dec. 15, 2017. (Delmer Membreno/Picture-Alliance/DPA/AP)

Trump Is Sending Guns South as Migrants Flee North

The administration’s push to weaken oversight of gun exports could worsen the Central American refugee crisis.

Activists in favor of the legalization of abortion comfort each other outside the National Congress in Buenos Aires after senators rejected a bill to legalize abortion on Aug. 9, 2018. (Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images)

Murdered Women Can’t Celebrate International Women’s Day

Advocates for gender equality in Latin America are making gains, but an epidemic of violence overshadows their progress.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador speaks during a press conference in the seventh military zone in Monterrey, Nuevo León, on Feb. 20. (Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico’s Old-School War on Crime Gets a Surprising New Champion

Why is AMLO attempting to further militarize policing, instead of pursuing the progressive reforms he promised during his campaign?

Motorcyclists ride past graffiti depicting late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and current President Nicolás Maduro in Caracas on Feb. 27. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s Good for Maduro Is Bad for Chavismo

The more atrocities Venezuela’s dictator commits, the less likely his regime is to survive him.

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó gather in Caracas Feb. 12. (Edilzon Gamez/Getty Images)

There Is Still a Way Out of Venezuela’s Stalemate

Both sides should heed the lessons of negotiated transitions in Chile and South Africa to forge a peaceful path to democracy.

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