Law

Angolan businesswoman Isabel dos Santos visits the Portuguese corporation Efacec’s new electric mobility industrial unit in Maia, Portugal, on Feb. 5, 2018.

The Downfall of an Angolan Dynasty

The crumbling of the dos Santos family empire reveals how Western companies allegedly enabled corruption in Africa.

Protesters carry placards to demand that ailing President Muhammadu Buhari resume work or resign in Abuja, Nigeria on August 7, 2017.

Nigeria’s President Should Resign

Muhammadu Buhari has failed to provide the security and stability he promised.

A woman is held by an assistant at a safe house for survivors of sexual assault in Mekele, the capital of Ethiopia’s Tigray region, on Feb. 27.

In Tigray, Sexual Violence Has Become a Weapon of War

The world must step in now and call the assaults what they are: a war crime.

U.S. and Japanese Navy ships

America and India Need a Little Flexibility at Sea

A U.S. operation targeting Indian claims has drawn unnecessary outrage.

Men walk past an improvised monument with the Ethiopian imperial flag.

Ethiopia Needs a Constitutional Convention

Establishing an inclusive reform process could end the country’s stalemate between unitarists and ethnonationalists.

Russian Bitcoin money laundering suspect Alexander Vinnik

Congress Can Do Better to Fight Weaponized Corruption

An understaffed agency vital to U.S. security desperately needs a bigger budget.

Turkish soldiers stand guard at the Silivri Prison and Courthouse complex in Silivri, Turkey, on Feb. 18, 2020. Turkish businessman Osman Kavala has been held in the prison since 2017.

Erdogan’s Power Plays Turn to Profit Margins

The Turkish president is willing to tank the economy if it means he can quash his ideological opponents.

The deck of the French aircraft carrier, Charles de Gaulle, sails off the eastern coast of Cyprus on Feb. 10, 2020.

Where to Draw the Line in the Eastern Mediterranean

As France sends aircraft carriers to the region, all sides should look to Bangladesh and Myanmar for a solution to the border dispute.

Boxes that, according to a U.N. report, were thought to contain assets of former Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi pictured at CIPDH's office in Accra, Ghana. Erik Goaied, a Tunisian businessman who was searching for Qaddafi's assets, claimed the boxes had been labeled with the logo of the International Committee of the Red Cross so as not to attract attention when they were transported out of Libya.

The Aid Organization That Wasn’t

Meet the Russian-led fake human rights group implicated in an international criminal caper.

A statue of the goddess of justice sits at a French courthouse.

U.S. Lawyers Are Foreign Kleptocrats’ Best Friends

How the United States’ legal community became global oligarchs’ most useful enablers.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivers a speech in front of a picture of Zeev Jabotinsky.

Israel’s Likud Isn’t the Party of Law and Order Anymore

In his constant quest for power, Benjamin Netanyahu is abandoning the Israeli right’s legalist traditions.

An elderly Korean woman weeps at a press conference.

South Korean Conservatives Fueled Apologism for Japan’s Sexual Slavery

Misleading narratives about so-called “comfort women” were created in the 2000s.

People sit on a bench among marijuana plants outside the Senate building in Mexico City on Sept. 30, 2020.

Mexico Prepares to Light Up—Legally

The country is on the brink of creating the world’s largest legal cannabis market.

Thai pro-democracy protesters

Biden Can Engage Southeast Asia Without Compromising U.S. Values

To counter China in the region, the United States should fight corruption and abuses while increasing investment and security cooperation.

Eliot Higgins, the founder and executive director of Bellingcat, speaks during the world’s biggest tech festival, Campus Party, in Utrecht, the Netherlands, on May 27, 2016.

The Mice Who Caught the Cat—and Rattled the Kremlin

“We Are Bellingcat” charts the rise of the digital sleuths who have used open-source investigations to foil Russia’s intelligence agencies.

A manned walking robot developed by robotics company Korea Future Technology in Gunpo, South Korea, on Dec. 27, 2016.

The World Must Regulate Tech Before It’s Too Late

We urgently need a global ethical consensus on how far technological advances can go.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky

Ukraine’s Debt Problem Spells Trouble

If the government continues to pile up debt without necessary reforms, it will set its economy on the road to ruin.

Former South African President Jacob Zuma leaves a meeting of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry Into Allegations of State Capture in Johannesburg on Nov. 16, 2020.

Is Jacob Zuma Headed for Jail?

South Africa’s former president failed to show up at a corruption inquiry. The country’s Constitutional Court is now deciding whether he should be arrested.

Participants pose to show their traditional Japanese tattoos (Irezumi), associated with the yakuza, during the annual Sanja Matsuri festival in the Asakusa district of Tokyo on May 20, 2018.

The Pandemic Is Putting Gangsters in Power

As states struggle, organized crime is rising to new prominence.

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