Law

Riot police in Hong Kong

China’s Crackdown in Hong Kong Won’t Spare Foreigners

Business as usual is over in the city, whether companies like it or not.

Los Angeles County Sheriff's SWAT team

America’s Police Prepared for the Wrong Enemy

Militarized U.S. police forces need to go back to serving communities first.

A Syrian man shows marks of torture on his back, after he was released from regime forces, in the Bustan Pasha neighbourhood of Syria's northern city of Aleppo on Aug. 23, 2012.

If a Torturer Switches Sides, Does He Deserve Mercy?

A Syrian official goes on trial this week for war crimes. His defense centers on the rebels who helped him defect—and now want nothing to do with him.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu point to a map of the Jordan Valley as he gives a speech in Ramat Gan on Sept. 10, 2019.

A Netanyahu Victory Would Be Bad News for Peace and the Rule of Law

If he leads the next government, the prime minister is likely to annex much of the West Bank and deepen attacks on judicial independence.

Police assist an injured man in London, on Nov.  29, 2019 after reports of shots being fired on London Bridge.

Tougher Sentencing Won’t Stop Terrorism

A string of attacks in Britain have led Boris Johnson’s government to seek simple remedies that won’t fix the problem.

Muslim women hold placards during a protest rally held against India's new citizenship law.

India’s New Laws Hurt Women Most of All

New Delhi wants people to prove their citizenship. But Indian women are the demographic least likely to possess paperwork.

Protesters in Taiwan

Taiwan’s War on Fake News Is Hitting the Wrong Targets

The fight on Chinese disinformation has become dangerously partisan.

Protesters hold a giant Polish national flag during a demonstration against a judicial reform pushed through by the right-wing government but criticised by the EU as a threat to judicial independence on July 24, 2018 in Warsaw.

Poland Is Purging Its Prosecutors

The PiS government is rooting out, relocating, and demoting political critics in the name of judicial reform.

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station in Gaborone, Botswana, on Oct. 24, 2014.

It’s Not Just Elephants That Are Under Attack in Botswana

The country’s government is rolling back wildlife protections and endangering media freedom and the rule of law.

Protesters wave an Armenian national flag in Yerevan on May 2, 2018.

How Old Courts Derail New Democracies

For the nations in Russia’s orbit, holdouts in the judicial system are an Achilles’ heel.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein listen to testimony during a committee hearing on the Foreign Agents Registration Act on July 26, 2017.

The Foreign Agents Registration Act Is Broken

Stepping up enforcement of FARA before reforming the act is a recipe for disaster.

A person wearing a rainbow flag leaves the Milimani High Court in Nairobi after Kenya’s high court, in a much-awaited verdict, refused to scrap laws criminalizing same-sex relationships, on May 24.

Kenya’s Bid for LGBT Equality Hits a Wall

Judges declined to overturn colonial-era laws criminalizing same-sex relationships. Human Rights Watch’s Neela Ghoshal says it’s a setback with regional repercussions.

A banner against a proposed extradition law is seen in a meeting room in Hong Kong, China. 14 May 2019.

The End of Hong Kong Is Almost Here

Allowing extradition to China would be another nail in the coffin.

Protesters hold placards and shout slogans as they take part in a rally against the extradition law outside the Legislative Council building in Hong Kong on May 4.

Hong Kong is Set for a U.S.-China Showdown

A controversial extradition bill has exposed the region’s autonomy as a fiction.

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court in London on April 11. (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

Julian Assange’s Legal Trouble, Explained

The WikiLeaks founder is in British custody and faces extradition to the United States.

Photographers outside the U.S. Justice Department in Washington on March 22, after special counsel Robert Mueller delivered his report to Attorney General William Barr. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

The Mueller Report Is a Test for the United States

As the world looks on, it’s up to Washington to demonstrate the strength of its institutions.

Serikzhan Bilash, the head of Atajurt Eriktileri, holds up a photo during a press conference in Almaty, Kazakhstan, on Jan. 21. (Reid Standish for Foreign Policy)

Astana Tries to Silence China Critics

Head of watchdog organization detained for work on Xinjiang camps.

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All the Legal Trouble in Trumpworld

Robert Mueller has finished his investigation, but that may be the least of the U.S. president’s worries.

Women march during International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in San Salvador, El Salvador, on Nov. 26, 2018. (Marvin Recinos/AFP/Getty Images)

El Salvador Kills Women as the U.S. Shrugs

Washington helped start an epidemic of violence against women in Central America. Now it’s washing its hands of the problem.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks in Moscow on Feb. 27. (Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)

Will Israelis Say Bye-Bye to Bibi?

The Israeli leader faces possible corruption charges weeks before a key election.