Lebanon

A young Syrian refugee peeks out of a bus window as fellow refugees prepare to leave Beirut on their journey home to Syria on Sept. 4, 2018.

Time Is Running Out for Syrians in Lebanon

Beirut is ready to send refugees home, but there isn’t much for them to go back to.

Supporters of Hezbollah fly the group’s flag during an event marking the 11th anniversary of the end of the 2006 war with Israel in the village of Khiam in southern Lebanon on Aug. 13, 2017.

Hezbollah’s Rainbow Coalition

The Shiite group is making inroads with other communities. Here’s how—and why.

Israel's Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz (L) speaks as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) and Noble Energy's Vice President for Major Projects George Hatfield (R) stand by during the inauguration of the newly-arrived foundation platform for the Leviathan natural gas field in the Mediterranean Sea, about 80 miles west of the Israeli city of Haifa, on January 31.

Will an Israeli Energy Boom Make the EU Pro-Israel?

Future dependency on Israeli natural gas could change the political equation for many European countries that are currently critical of Israeli policies toward Palestinians.

A Syrian refugee child waits as refugees prepare to leave the Lebanese capital Beirut to return to their homes in Syria on September 9, 2018.

Lebanon Is Sick and Tired of Syrian Refugees

The country has hosted the most refugees per capita in the world—and it’s now out of patience.

Protesters wave flags during a rally near the Bourj Hammoud landfill north of Beirut on Aug. 16, 2017.

Greetings From Trash Mountain

Lebanon is replacing its famed peaks with ones made of trash. Its population’s health—and pocketbooks—are suffering.

Fighters with the Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah party, carry flags as they parade in a southern suburb of the capital Beirut, to mark the al-Quds (Jerusalem) International Day, on May 31.

Hezbollah Isn’t Just in Beirut. It’s in New York, Too.

The trial of a senior operative reveals the extent of the terrorist organization’s reach in the United States and Canada.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally in the capital, Tehran, on May 10.

Trump’s Iran Crackdown Isn’t Enough to Stop Hezbollah

Unless Washington targets the group more effectively, it can outlive the pressure on Tehran.

Children of members of Lebanon's Shiite Hezbollah movement hold portraits of Hezbollah chief Hasan Nasrallah and Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei during a procession following the mourning period of Ashura in the southern Lebanese city of Nabatieh on Oct. 4, 2017.

Hezbollah Isn’t Iran’s Favorite Proxy Anymore

As tensions with Washington rise, Tehran has discovered the Lebanese militia isn’t up for doing its dirty work.

Supporters of Lebanon's Hezbollah group hold national, Palestinian, and the Shiite movement's yellow flags during a rally held in the Lebanese capital Beirut on Dec. 11, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Is Making Hezbollah Stronger

By threatening collective punishment over Lebanon’s most disruptive force, Washington is weakening the rest of its society.

A truck carrying Islamic State fighters who surrendered to Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), as they are transported out of  Baghouz in Syria's northern Deir Ezzor province on Feb. 20, 2019.

ISIS Has Not Been Defeated. It’s Alive and Well in Southern Syria.

While Washington celebrates victory, the Islamic State is regrouping, and the Assad regime is letting it happen.

Workers clean the beach of the coastal town of Zouk Mosbeh, north of Beirut, on Jan. 23, 2018, as garbage washed ashore after stormy weather. (Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Facing an Economic and Environmental Disaster

Rather than rushing to punish Hezbollah, the United States should be shoring up the country’s new government to avoid state collapse.

Zain (Zain Al Rafeea), right, cares for Rahil’s son, Yonas (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole), after 
Rahil is detained in Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum. (Fares Sokhon/Sony Pictures Classics)

Broke in Beirut

In Capernaum, Nadine Labaki finds a new way for film to deal with poverty.

Iraqi men flash the victory gesture from inside a car during the Hashed Shaabi (Popular Mobilisation) paramilitary forces' celebrations marking the first anniversary of victory over the Islamic State (IS) group on December 10, 2018. (Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images)

Start Small to Stop the Next ISIS

One year on from the defeat of the Islamic State, the new U.S. Congress should draw on lessons learned from efforts to counter violent extremism.

Hezbollah supporters in Beirut, Lebanon, on Aug. 14, 2007. (Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Protecting Hezbollah’s Cocaine Trade in Latin America

The country's institutions are not a counterweight to Hezbollah, but its enablers.

Lebanese soldiers take part in a military parade for Independence Day celebrations marking 74 years since the end of France's mandate in Lebanon, on November 22, 2017 in Beirut.

The United States Has Not Lost Lebanon

Despite Hezbollah's strong election showing, American policies are working and Washington must stay the course.

Hezbollah supporters rally in Beirut, Lebanon, on Dec. 11, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

Why Is Trump Going Soft on Hezbollah?

Barack Obama did too little to curb the militant group, especially in Latin America. Donald Trump should do more.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, speaks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 25. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Bibi Needs Trump’s Help Countering Iran in Syria

Restraining Tehran is in the interest of both Israel and the United States.

An oil rig in the Tamar field off Israel's coast in 2013. It was the first major find in the Eastern Mediterranean and will supply natural gas for export to Egypt. (Noble Energy)

Curb Your Enthusiasm

The Eastern Mediterranean energy patch is hot — unfortunately, in more ways than one.

U.S. President Donald Trump brandishes a sword during a welcome ceremony in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on May 20, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Middle East Strategy Is Totally Boring

There’s a very familiar method to the administration’s apparent regional madness.

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