Lebanon

Supporters of Lebanese President Michel Aoun hold posters of him as they gather near the presidential palace in Baabda on Nov. 3.

How Michel Aoun Failed in Lebanon

More and more protesters say the general-turned-president has broken too many promises and must go.

Protesters link arms to hold the line at a roadblock on the Ring Bridge in Beirut on Oct. 26.

To the Barricades in Beirut

Lebanese protesters are reappropriating roadblocks—long a mark of civil war-era division—as a symbol of unity.

West German schoolchildren on the way to school peer at East German border guards at a new opening in the Berlin Wall

Our Top Weekend Reads

The world marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Hezbollah is stuck between the establishment and the protesters, and Palestinian Israelis wield newfound political power.

Smoke rises from an Israeli army post blown away by army engineers near the town of Zarit on the Israeli-Lebanese border on May 16, 2000, as part of the preparation for an Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon.

Israel’s Occupation of Lebanon Failed. Turkey’s Invasion of Syria Probably Will, Too.

Safe zones rarely bring security benefits, and the Turkish incursion in northern Syria risks ending the same way as Israel’s disastrous occupation of southern Lebanon.

A picture taken on a Lebanese Army-organized press tour shows Army commandos on the Lebanese-Syrian border on Aug. 28, 2017.

Washington Should Back, Not Punish, the Lebanese Military

With ongoing protests, potential sectarian clashes, and threats of terrorism in the region looming, the country’s armed forces need propping up now more than ever.

Supporters of Hassan Nasrallah, the head of Lebanon’s militant Shiite Muslim Hezbollah movement, watch him speak through a giant screen at a mosque in Beirut on Nov. 1.

Hezbollah’s Old Tricks Won’t Work in Lebanon

The Shiite group has to decide whether it is a resistance movement or part of the establishment.

A Lebanese protester chants slogans during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in Lebanon's capital Beirut on Oct. 31.

Why Protesters in Lebanon Are Taking to the Streets

The protests combine political and economic grievances and could bring down the country’s sect-based political order.

A Lebanese protester confronts soldiers during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in Lebanon's southern city of Sidon on Nov. 1.

Lebanon Has Suffered From Sectarianism for Too Long

Mass protests could put an end to the ethnic clientelism that has empowered corrupt leaders. But demonstrators must stand their ground or risk being co-opted like those who rose up in 2005.

An illustration including images of Saad Hariri, the Lebanese protestors, and the Lebanese flag.

Lebanon’s Protests Will Rage On

Despite Hariri’s resignation, public anger won’t be easy to soothe.

Lebanese security forces stand between supporters of the Shiite Hezbollah movement (foreground) and anti-government protesters (background) at Riad al-Solh Square in Beirut on Oct. 25.

Lebanon’s Protests Are Leaderless. That May Be Their Strength.

Fed up with decades of economic mismanagement and corruption, most demonstrators just want the government gone.

Lebanese demonstrators burn tires and wave their national flag during a protest against dire economic conditions on a highway between Beirut and the northern city of Tripoli on Oct. 18.

The Arab World’s Revolution Against Sectarianism

Lebanon and Iraq are rising up against constitutions that have empowered religious factions—and enabled their corruption.

Lebanese women take part in a demonstration in downtown Beirut on Oct. 21.

Iran Is Losing the Middle East, Protests in Lebanon and Iraq Show

Tehran may be good at winning influence, but it is bad at ruling after that.

Lebanese demonstrators stand by a fire near a makeshift barricade during clashes with security forces at a mass protest in Beirut on Oct. 18.

Lebanon’s Year of Fire

From self-immolations to forest blazes, the country’s conflagrations are igniting pan-sectarian protests.

A young Syrian refugee peeks out of a bus window as fellow refugees prepare to leave Beirut on their journey home to Syria on Sept. 4, 2018.

Time Is Running Out for Syrians in Lebanon

Beirut is ready to send refugees home, but there isn’t much for them to go back to.

Supporters of Hezbollah fly the group’s flag during an event marking the 11th anniversary of the end of the 2006 war with Israel in the village of Khiam in southern Lebanon on Aug. 13, 2017.

Hezbollah’s Rainbow Coalition

The Shiite group is making inroads with other communities. Here’s how—and why.

Israel's Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz (L) speaks as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) and Noble Energy's Vice President for Major Projects George Hatfield (R) stand by during the inauguration of the newly-arrived foundation platform for the Leviathan natural gas field in the Mediterranean Sea, about 80 miles west of the Israeli city of Haifa, on January 31.

Will an Israeli Energy Boom Make the EU Pro-Israel?

Future dependency on Israeli natural gas could change the political equation for many European countries that are currently critical of Israeli policies toward Palestinians.

A Syrian refugee child waits as refugees prepare to leave the Lebanese capital Beirut to return to their homes in Syria on September 9, 2018.

Lebanon Is Sick and Tired of Syrian Refugees

The country has hosted the most refugees per capita in the world—and it’s now out of patience.

Protesters wave flags during a rally near the Bourj Hammoud landfill north of Beirut on Aug. 16, 2017.

Greetings From Trash Mountain

Lebanon is replacing its famed peaks with ones made of trash. Its population’s health—and pocketbooks—are suffering.

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