Libya

A Libyan fireman stands in front of smoke and flames rising from a storage tank at an oil facility in northern Libya's Ras Lanuf region on January 23, 2016, after it was set ablaze earlier in the week following attacks launched by Islamic State jihadists to seize key port terminals.

The West Is Letting Libya Tear Itself Apart

Calling for elections in the absence of stable institutions while competing for diplomatic and economic influence won’t rebuild the country — it will destroy it.

A man is reflected in a glass door as he walks past a portrait of Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi displayed inside the Libyan economic cooperation office in Seoul on July 28, 2010. (PARK JI-HWAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Kim Won’t Be Duped Like Qaddafi

Washington's Libya model for nuclear negotiations is an illustration of why nuclear weapons are necessary.

Then-Congressman Mike Pompeo listens as Hillary Clinton testifies before the House Select Committee on Benghazi in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 22, 2015. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Pompeo Has Been Undermining the State Department Since the Benghazi Investigation

Trump's nominee for secretary of state must answer for the false claims and recycled conspiracies he propagated.

Chris Gash illustration for Foreign Policy

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends a meeting on November 14, 2017, in Riyadh. (FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Strongmen Are Weaker Than They Look

Authoritarians are on the rise around the world, but history shows they’re mostly helpless.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and his German counterpart, Sigmar Gabriel, speak to the media following talks in Berlin on June 27, 2017. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Europe’s Sanctions-Blocking Threats Are Empty

When it comes to Iran sanctions, the EU must satisfy Trump’s demands. Access to the U.S. financial system hangs in the balance.

Migrants rest at a detention center in the Libyan city of Zawiyah on June 17. (Taha Jawashi/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Is Shocked — Shocked — By Libya’s Slave Markets

The continent is finally admitting what it has known all along: that its migration policies are complicit in crimes against humanity.

Iraqi fighters of the Hashed al-Shaabi (Popular Mobilisation Units) stand next to a wall bearing the Islamic State (IS) flag as they enter the city of al-Qaim, in Iraq's western Anbar province near the Syrian border on Nov. 3.  (Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

The Caliphate Is Destroyed, But the Islamic State Lives On

Why the United States can’t be complacent about undermining the remnants of the terrorist group.

On this episode of the E.R.,  the panel discusses the Libyan Political Agreement.

Can Libya Be Put Back Together?

Six years after the fall of Qaddafi, Libya still teeters on the edge of chaos. Here’s why that matters.

16. Intercepted_Tripoli

Nearly There, but Never Further Away

Europe has outsourced the dirty work of border control to Libyan militias. In doing so, it has turned African migrants into commodities to be captured, sold, and traded like slaves.

LAMPEDUSA, ITALY - MAY 19: A man is helped off a small rubber boat by crew members from NGO Sea-Eye on May 19, 2017 in international waters off the coast of Libya.  (Photo by Christian Marquardt/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

The Savior’s Dilemma

Are naval search-and-rescue operations saving migrants’ lives — or just encouraging them to take greater risks?

001_senegal1

All for Nothing

Migrants who fail to reach Europe face humiliation, isolation, and impoverishment at home.

haftar

Inside Putin’s Libyan Power Play

The Kremlin is trying to prove it can succeed where Washington failed in ending the country's slide into chaos.

qatar

Why Did Several Arab Countries Suddenly Cut Ties With Qatar?

On the heels of Trump's visit to Saudi Arabia, that country and others cut Gulf ties.

Load 10 More Articles