Libya

Actor Charlie Sheen attends a charity softball game to benefit “California Strong” at Pepperdine University on January 13, 2019 in Malibu, California. (Rich Polk/Getty Images for California Strong)

How Russia Tried to Weaponize Charlie Sheen

What’s behind an odd, international campaign to free a Russian operative from a Libyan jail?

Fighters loyal to the U.N.-recognized Libyan Government of National Accord

Our Top Weekend Reads

The impact of the Israel-UAE deal on the war in Libya, what we know about Biden’s foreign-policy vision, and the disastrous state of Taiwan’s military.

Fighters loyal to the U.N.-recognized Libyan Government of National Accord (GNA) secure the area of Abu Qurain, halfway between the capital Tripoli and Libya's second city Benghazi, against forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar, who is backed by the United Arab Emirates and Russia, on July 20.

The Israel-UAE Deal Won’t Bring Peace, but It Will Prolong the War in Libya

The much-touted agreement cements the regional divide between traditionalist monarchies and their rivals, while their respective proxies fight over the spoils from Libya to Yemen.

Self-proclaimed Libyan National Army Chief of Staff Khalifa Haftar arrives for a conference on Libya.

Could Libya Be Partitioned?

Strongman Khalifa Haftar has lost the initiative, and it looks as if the only option left for his international backers is to divide the country.

Sailors standing on the deck of a warship at a parade during the Turkish International Ceremony at Mehmetcik Abidesi Martyrs Memorial near Seddulbahir Turkey on April 24, 2015.

How Did the Eastern Mediterranean Become the Eye of a Geopolitical Storm?

The region’s powers and the West are facing off against Turkey—and Turkey is not going down without a fight.

Saudi-led coalition soldiers deploy to the outskirts of Aden, Yemen, on Aug. 3, 2015, during a military operation against Houthi rebels and their allies.

Give Up on Proxy Wars in the Middle East

The United States has the opportunity to reshape its alliances and bolster lasting stability in the region—but only by ending a failed approach.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Russian President Vladimir Putin

Congress Pushes for Sanctions on Turkey, Russia Over Libyan War

Putin and Erdogan “act when there’s a stick involved,” a House aide said.

Evening Prayers Al-Azhar

All the Dictator’s Sheikhs

How Sisi co-opted Egypt’s religious institutions for political gain.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Libya's interim leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil wave as they attend Friday prayers in Tripoli on Sept. 16, 2011.

Erdogan Is Libya’s Man Without a Plan

Turkey is standing in the wreckage of a foreign-policy adventure with no discernible strategy.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at a peace summit on Libya

Pentagon Escalates Rhetoric in Libya as Russian Planes Arrive

U.S. Africa Command calls out Moscow for tipping the scales in a conflict the Trump administration has mostly sought to avoid.

Pro-Turkish Syrian fighters

It’s Syrian vs. Syrian in Libya

Turkey and Russia are using desperate mercenaries from the last war to fight in the next one.

French President Emmanuel Macron walks with Libyan Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj and General Khalifa Haftar, commander of the Libyan National Army, after talks aimed at easing tensions in Libya.

Russia Isn’t the Only One Getting Its Hands Dirty in Libya

The United Arab Emirates, backed by France, is helping to fuel continued bloodshed in the North African country.

Fighters of a military battalion loyal to Libyan Gen. Khalifa Haftar

The Coronavirus Could Heal Libya

The pandemic might prompt the kind of cooperation needed to end the country’s civil war, after years of fighting and foreign intervention failed.

People inspect the damage inside a building following a rocket attack by forces loyal to eastern Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar.

The Libyan Civil War Is About to Get Worse

None of the parties involved is serious about reaching a political settlement, meaning the conflict could kill many more this year.

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