Mali

Members of the Koglweogo, a self-defense militia, attend an annual gathering in Siguinvousé, Burkina Faso, on Feb 14.

Biden’s Strategy in the Sahel Looks a Lot Like Trump’s

U.S. diplomacy is back in West Africa—but the United States is also back to its old counterterrorism playbook.

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How to Restore U.S. Credibility in Africa

By standing up for democracy and free trade, the United States can outflank China and Russia, its authoritarian rivals on the continent.

Senegalese soldiers from the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Mali, MINUSMA, on July 24, 2019, a day after suicide bombers in a vehicle painted with U.N. markings injured several troops and civilians in an attack on an international peacekeeping base in Mali.

Peacekeeping Missions and a Marshall Plan Won’t Save Mali

The country needs stronger institutions to bolster public confidence in the democratic system. The international community can help.

The French Army patrols a rural area in northern Burkina Faso on Nov. 14, 2019.

France and the United States Are Making West Africa’s Security Situation Worse

France’s unilateralism and the United States’ wavering are destabilizing the Sahel—and creating an opening for Russia and China.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo addresses the virtual Republican convention in a pre-recorded video from Jerusalem, Israel, on Aug. 25.

Is Trump Touting His Diplomatic Achievements to Get Reelected?

Both parties have featured speeches from key diplomats at their conventions, with Mike Pompeo making a controversial cameo at the RNC—but they aren’t proposing much that’s new.

ECOWAS mediator and former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan arrives to lead talks with West African envoys and Mali's military junta on Aug. 24 in Bamako, Mali.

The African Union’s Hypocrisy Undermines Its Credibility

The AU’s double standard on lifelong leaders who reject term limits undercuts its moral standing to reject military coups.

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Can Mali Escape Its Past?

Politics in the country have followed familiar cycles of violence and collapse.

Malian soldiers in the capital of Mali after a military coup.

Coup Plotters in Mali Were Trained by U.S. Military

The overthrow, swiftly condemned by the U.S. government, could pose a setback in the regional fight against extremist groups.

Malian Air Force deputy chief of staff Ismael Wague speaks during a press conference in Kati, Mali on August 19.

Mali Needs a Marshall Plan, Not a Military Regime

American, French, and West African leaders must pressure the army to stand down and form an interim government, before a power vacuum and violent extremism threaten the entire region.

Malian soldiers drive through the streets of Bamako on August 19, the day after mutinying troops seized Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita.

A Coup Won’t End Mali’s Corruption and Insecurity

Replacing the president won’t resolve the country’s deep-seated political problems. If neighboring nations and global powers don’t demand a democratic transition, it could lead to greater instability across West Africa.

Prisoners charged with belonging to the al Qaeda-affiliated MUJAO armed group are taken out of a jail at the gendarmerie in the northern Malian city of Gao while they wait to be transferred on a military flight to Bamako on Feb. 26, 2013.

Al Qaeda and ISIS Had a Truce in Africa—Until They Didn’t

The Sahel region was inching toward stability, but conflict between local jihadi groups is threatening to bring back chaos.

U.N. forces in Mali.

U.S. to Ramp Up Counterterrorism Efforts in Sahel Region

Despite years of U.S. and international efforts to fight terrorism in the area, extremist groups are gaining ground.

A group of migrant men, mainly from Niger and Nigeria, sit in the back of a pickup truck during a journey across northern Niger toward the Libyan border post of Qatrun on Jan. 15.

2020 Could be Niger’s Year of Reckoning

The country is home to one of the largest deployments of U.S. military personnel in Africa and is a linchpin of regional stability—but the coming year could throw all that into turmoil.

A boy living in a derelict building damaged during the Angolan civil war is seen through a hole in Kuito, in Angola’s Bie province, on June 2.

Africa’s ‘Civil Wars’ Are Regional Nightmares

Long considered domestic issues, the continent’s battles are really international contests for influence and power.

Former Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubeye Maiga (2L) is received in Mopti on his visit to Mali's central region on October 14, 2018. (Photo by Michele Cattani/ AFP/Getty Images)

Dumping One Government Won’t Fix Mali

March’s deadly massacre exposed the lack of progress since the country’s peace accords—and the many political and security reforms that are needed.

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