Media

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The End of History and the Last Map

Cartography and conflict in the post-Cold War world.

Protesters in Taiwan

Taiwan’s War on Fake News Is Hitting the Wrong Targets

The fight on Chinese disinformation has become dangerously partisan.

Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex

Harry and Meghan Are Leaving the Job but Keeping the Salary

Blame the British press and Buckingham Palace staff for the royal Brexit.

A Yemeni artist sitting atop the rubble of a collapsed buiding, plays the aoud during a street performance in Yemen's third city of Taez, on December 6, 2019.

Middle Eastern Voices Deserve to Be Heard in Western Media

Coverage of Suleimani’s killing shows locals are still silenced.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Mike Pence applaud U.S. President Donald Trump at his State of the Union address in Washington on Feb. 5.

The Most Overhyped and Underrated Stories of 2019

A look at the stories the major media overreported—or paid too little attention to—in the past year.

The BT-9 guard tower, part of the 
Berlin Wall exhibit at the Newseum in Washington before its closure in December.

Why the Berlin Wall Still Matters

Fragments of the wall have become museum pieces. But with the rise of extremist parties in Germany, the debate over the barrier’s legacy is anything but history.

Scenes from VR video games

Virtual Reality Takes on Historical Trauma

A wave of new Polish games reexamines Soviet repression.

Supporters of the Law and Justice party watch the announcement of the results of the Polish parliamentary elections on television screens in Warsaw on Oct. 13.

Poland’s State of the Media

How public television became an outlet for the Law and Justice party—and what it means for democracy.

Swedish Commander in Chief Sverker Goranson talks to media after a nearly two-hour-long meeting with the Swedish parliament defense committee in Stockholm on their fifth day of searching for a suspected foreign vessel in the Stockholm archipelago on Oct. 21, 2014.

Loose Lips Sink Democracies?

Russia has started using the West’s own reporting against it. Here’s how to respond.

An Iranian woman walks past a new mural painted on the walls of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran

Tehran Paints Over Its Anti-American Murals

The city’s old public art showed a United States to be feared. The new ones depict a country that is weaker, more laughable, and riddled with its own problems.

A man dressed as "Fake News Media" participates in the annual Village Halloween parade on Sixth Avenue in New York on Oct. 31.

To Stop Fake News, Online Journalism Needs a Global Watchdog 

Without regulations that push search engines and social media companies to prioritize reliable and truthful sources of information, propaganda and censored content will dominate digital platforms.

A woman walks next to posters commemorating the 60th anniversary of France's famous comic characters Asterix and Obelix in Paris on Oct. 9.

Can Comics Save International Relations?

Academics need to get better at reaching non-experts. Narrative media offer one possibility.

The logo for Twitter is projected onto a man in London on Aug. 9, 2017.

Thumb-Boat Diplomacy Could Undo U.S. Foreign Policy

It isn’t just Trump. All sorts of policymakers are using Twitter to promote their policies and condemn their adversaries.

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It’s Trump’s World Now. What Do We Do About It?

How to fix U.S. democracy, populism, trade, and other pressing issues.

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The Internet Broke the News Industry—and Can Fix It, Too

The only way to save journalism is to make readers direct participants in making, and paying for, the media.

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station in Gaborone, Botswana, on Oct. 24, 2014.

It’s Not Just Elephants That Are Under Attack in Botswana

The country’s government is rolling back wildlife protections and endangering media freedom and the rule of law.

President of Cameroon Paul Biya (L) walks with Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari (R) following his arrival at the airport in Yaoundé, Cameroon, on July 29, 2015.

No Continent for Old Men

Africa has the world’s youngest population and its oldest leaders. If the next generation wants change, young Africans must abandon dreams of private-sector success and enter the political arena.

The Pentagon logo and an American flag are lit up in the briefing room of the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on Jan. 3, 2002.

Mattis’s Successor Signals He Wants to End the Pentagon’s Long Silence

Mark Esper is beefing up his media relations team. But is it too late?

A man reads a newspaper on a railway platform in Mumbai on July 24.

India’s Media Can’t Speak Truth to Power

Journalism is in trouble in the world’s largest democracy. The consequences could be dire.

Adam Michnik, a prominent communist-era dissident who is now editor-in-chief of Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland's leading liberal newspaper, is pictured in his newspaper's office on Feb. 23, 2018 in Warsaw.

Poland’s Government Is Systematically Silencing Opposition Voices

Adam Michnik was a hero of the anti-communist struggle. Now his renowned newspaper, Gazeta Wyborcza, is under attack from a ruling party that refuses to tolerate dissent.