Media

Early versions of Foreign Policy featured a narrow format and a different logo color for each season—blue for winter, green for spring, burgundy for summer, and yellow or brown for fall.

Consensus Lost

How FP set out to change the world.

Janine di Giovanni in Helmand province, Afghanistan, in January 2010.

The First Draft of History

Why the decline of foreign reporting makes for worse foreign policy.

U.S. Capitol Police detain pro-Trump rioters outside the House Chamber during a joint session of Congress in Washington on Jan. 6.

As Britain Gawps at U.S. Chaos, Violence Could Cross the Atlantic

The U.K. can’t afford complacency in a politically poisoned Anglosphere.

Supporters and employees of Philippine broadcast network ABS-CBN protest against government attacks on press freedom, in Manila on Feb. 21, 2020.

How Press Freedom Came Under Attack in 2020

Citizens hungry for information turned to the media during the pandemic, but governments around the world used the crisis to restrict journalists.

Philippine journalist Maria Ressa (C), is escorted by police after an arrest warrant was served, shortly after arriving at the international airport in Manila on March 29, 2019.

Biden Must Restore America’s Reputation as a Beacon of Press Freedom

After four years of hostility to journalists and a free press, the United States must repair the damage Trump has done at home and abroad.

An Iranian man watches U.S. President Donald Trump giving a speech on television in Tehran on Nov. 4.

Middle East Rivals Take Jabs at the State of U.S. Democracy

Regional media is covering the U.S. elections much like we covered theirs.

A Democratic Party supporter reacts by giving the finger after Donald Trump's victory is announced on television in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on Nov. 9, 2016.

Don’t Call the Race Too Early

An early declaration of the election result from a partisan network—on the left or right—could trigger violence in the United States.

President Donald Trump departs after speaking to media at the White House.

Trump Appointee Seeks to Turn U.S. Media Agency Into a Political Cheerleader

Michael Pack, the controversial head of U.S. government broadcasting, tries to blow up the firewalls that have protected Voice of America and other agencies from political interference.

A “misinformation newsstand” aiming to educate voters about disinformation ahead of the 2018 U.S. midterm elections as seen in Manhattan on Oct. 30, 2018.

Forget Counterterrorism, the United States Needs a Counter-Disinformation Strategy

If the U.S. government wants to win the information wars, Cold War-era tactics won’t cut it anymore.

A promotional photo from the Turkish TV show Dirilis: Ertugrul.

How Turkey’s Soft Power Conquered Pakistan

The TV drama “Ertugrul” reveals how neo-Ottoman fantasies are finding an enthusiastic audience in a country that struggles with Saudi and Western influence.

Soviet Red Army soldiers march in downtown Kabul during a military parade in October 1986.

Russia Is Winning the Information War in Afghanistan

The country’s former occupier is using Kremlin-backed media to fuel anger toward the United States.

A French journalist takes a nap circa 1860

Journalism Has a Class Problem, Too

The increasingly narrow backgrounds of reporters distort coverage at home and abroad.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan arrives on stage to deliver a speech following a cabinet meeting in Ankara on June 9.

The Turkish Government Closed a University Because It Fears Free Speech

Ankara shut an institution founded by religious conservatives and attacks tech companies in order to stop young Turks from accessing a free academic and media environment.

Media at Minneapolis Protest

Attacks on the Press Track a Democratic Backslide

As press freedom declines globally, the United States must reckon with its own diminishment.

Commuters look at their cell phones in a subway station in Beijing on April 11 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

As the Coronavirus Spreads, Conspiracy Theories Are Going Viral Too

Dubious and unfounded claims on the internet intended for domestic consumption are reaching far beyond their target audiences, allowing governments to spread disinformation cheaply and easily.

A man reads a coronavirus news alert

The World Is Addicted to Pandemic Porn

The insatiable appetite for disaster information is psychologically understandable—and politically dangerous.

China's state broadcaster CGTN anchor Liu Xin

The United States Can’t Win Playing China’s Media Games

Tit-for-tat media expulsions only end up benefiting Beijing.

world-maps-cold-war-geopolitics-social

The End of History and the Last Map

Cartography and conflict in the post-Cold War world.

Protesters in Taiwan

Taiwan’s War on Fake News Is Hitting the Wrong Targets

The fight on Chinese disinformation has become dangerously partisan.

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