Media

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the Black Sea resort of Sochi on Feb. 14.

Russia Has Won the Information War in Turkey

The Kremlin doesn’t even need fake news to push its agenda on Turkish social media. Because domestic disinformation is rampant, Moscow has managed to infect both sides of the debate.

A nurse prepares a measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in New York on April 5. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

How Russia Sows Confusion in the U.S. Vaccine Debate

Not content to cause political problems, Moscow’s trolls are also undermining public health.

A woman sits in front of a riot police cordon after a standoff during a demonstration against Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic outside the presidential building in Belgrade, on March 17, 2019.

Serbia’s Protests Aren’t the Beginning of a Balkan Spring

Demonstrations against Aleksandar Vucic’s authoritarian government won’t achieve anything until the opposition can present a coherent alternative.

A security official stands guard near the Al Noor mosque after a shooting in Christchurch on March 15. (Tessa Burrows/AFP)

How the Christchurch Shooter Played the World’s Media

Friday’s shooting in New Zealand was a terrorist attack conceived for the internet era.

Milorad Dodik, president of Bosnia and Herzegovina's Republika Srpska entity, addresses media after casting his vote, on September 25, 2016, at one of local voting stations in Western-Bosnian town of Laktasi.

Journalists Are Living in Fear in Republika Srpska

Bosnia has a thriving media sector, but those who refuse to become mouthpieces for the government increasingly find themselves in exile or under police protection.

Indian television journalist Arnab Goswami in 2017. (Sujit Jaiswal/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

India’s Media Is War-Crazy

Journalism is taking a back seat to jingoism.

Heavy pollution surrounds the China Central Television (CCTV) headquarters building in Beijing on Jan. 18, 2012. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese Media Targeted in Foreign Agent Crackdown

CCTV’s U.S. arm agrees to register as an agent of the Chinese government.

Freshly printed copies of the San Francisco Chronicle run through the printing press at one of the Chronicle's printing facilities in San Francisco on Sept. 20, 2007. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

You Can Hack This Headline for $200

Cybercriminals claim to be selling the ability to manipulate media outlets’ articles.

Foreign Policy illustration

China’s Media Forecast Is Bleak and Stormy

Spring Festival is coming, but the country's politics remain frozen.

From left, Rafik Bakhishov, Zafar Ahmadov, and Tofig Yagublu take part in a hunger strike at the headquarters of the opposition party Musavat in Baku, Azerbaijan, on Jan. 15. (Khadija Ismayilova)

Hunger Strike Gains Momentum in Azerbaijan

Seeing Baku as a strategic partner, the United States and Europe overlook rights violations.

A Russian policeman looks at TV screens in a shop in Moscow on Feb. 1, 2007, during the broadcasting of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s annual address to Russian and foreign media. (Denis Sinyakov/AFP/Getty)

How Do You Say ‘Fake News’ in Russian?

Russian news sites portray the U.S. presidential election as a prelude to civil war.

Portraits of Saudi King Salman bin Abdulazziz and his son Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are seen on October 18, 2018 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Jamal Khashoggi Had Skin in the Game. The Crown Prince’s Cheerleaders Didn’t.

Too often, Westerners treat courageous local experts like pawns in a political game. The journalist’s murder should serve as a reminder that, for some, writing an op-ed is a deadly risk.

A woman holds a portrait of missing journalist and Riyadh critic Jamal Khashoggi reading "Jamal Khashoggi is missing since October 2" during a demonstration in front of the Saudi Arabian consulate on Oct. 9, 2018 in Istanbul. (OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

Mohammad bin Salman Is Scared of Saudi Expats

The crown prince will stop at nothing to silence his growing number of critics, regardless of where they live.

Posters advocating for Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi hang on a police barricade in front of  Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 8. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is a Slap in the Face to the United States

Washington should explore retaliatory measures that impose real costs on Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Foreign Policy illustration

China’s Global Propaganda Is Aimed at Bosses, Not Foreigners

Chinese reporters overseas are rewarded for whiny nationalism, not persuasive argument.

The managing editor of China Central Television Africa, Pang Xinhua, shows a local journalist in Nairobi how the organization has expanded in different parts of Africa on June 12, 2012. (Simon Maina/AFP/GettyImages)

China Is Buying African Media’s Silence

I wrote about Chinese oppression in a South African paper. Hours later, they cancelled my column.

A man withdraws Iranian rials from an ATM in Tehran on July 31. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Ordinary Iranians Will Suffer, but Regime Insiders Will Profit

On our podcast: Journalist Jason Rezaian recalls life in Iran under sanctions.

Protesters hold a banner reading "Stand up for decent Slovakia" during a protest in Bratislava, Slovakia, on June 22, 2018, four months after the murder of journalist Jan Kuciak and his fiancee.

Press Freedom Is Still Under Attack in Slovakia

A journalist’s murder shocked the country in February, but it hasn’t led to a more independent media.

The leader of the far-right League party, Matteo Salvini (R), embraces Silvio Berlusconi during a joint press conference in Rome on March 1, 2018.

In Italy, a Right-Wing Spin Doctor Repents

How Silvio Berlusconi’s top propagandist become one of Matteo Salvini’s toughest critics.

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