Mexico

U.S. President Donald Trump, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and top officials reached a truce in the trade war over dinner at the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires on Dec. 1. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump and Xi Park Trade War—For Now

But the U.S. president raises new uncertainties over the fate of the trade deal with Mexico and Canada.

Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a press conference in Mexico City on Oct. 29. (Ulises Ruiz /AFP/Getty Images)

How Will AMLO Govern Mexico?

Mexico’s new president promises to fight corruption and inequality, but critics worry he’ll be the country’s Hugo Chávez.

A police agent confiscates illegal poppy flowers during an operation in Sinaloa, Mexico on March 15. (Rashide Frias /AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico’s War on Drugs Failed

Proposals to legalize opium production could still beat the cartels—but only if poppy farmers are part of the process.

Leaders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico signed the revised NAFTA accord at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Nov. 30, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Trump Hit Pause on the Trade War With China?

Under mounting pressure, the U.S. president needs a win at G-20 summit.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro walks with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 7, 2015. (Andy Wong/Getty Images)

How to Respond to Chinese Investment in Latin America

The United States can compete without making things worse.

An C-17 Globemaster III aircrew with the 3rd Airlift Squadron load cargo in support of Operation Faithful Patriot at Fort Knox, Kentucky, on Oct. 29. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zoe M. Wockenfuss)

Both Sides Are Overselling Trump’s Troop Deployment to the Border

The active-duty troops will mostly be putting up razor wire and moving border police.

An oil worker lies on a deck during a fire drill aboard the Pemex Ku-S oil processing center in the Gulf of Mexico on Aug. 5, 2010. (Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico and Brazil’s Crude Politics

A potential return to resource nationalism could set both countries back.

U.S. President Donald Trump talks up the revised NAFTA deal from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on Oct. 1. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Trump Mainly Rebranding NAFTA?

The economic impact—and political future—of the '94 trade deal's successor is utterly unclear.

U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a signed presidential memorandum aimed at what he calls "China's economic aggression" in Washington on March 22. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Lesson of Smoot-Hawley

On the podcast: The last big American trade war was in 1930. It ended badly for everyone.

Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland arrives for a meeting in Washington with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to salvage NAFTA, on Aug. 30. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. to Canada: Deal or No Deal?

As the deadline looms, here’s how the complicated NAFTA talks could play out.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks by phone with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto about a new bilateral trade agreement at the White House on Aug. 27. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Will Trump’s New Mexico Deal Save NAFTA—or Kill It?

The agreement that purports to replace NAFTA does not include Canada for now.

A Honduran immigrant inspects map of Mexico showing train routes leading north at a shelter for undocumented immigrants on September 14, 2014, in Tenosique, Mexico. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Mexico Can’t Handle Your Tired, Poor, and Huddled Masses

Ever since Donald Trump's election, America's southern neighbor has become a growing destination for migrants—and the country is already buckling under the strain.

Flags with the logo and the World Cup 2018 mascot Zabivaka are seen in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow on June 30, 2018 during the Russia 2018 World Cup football tournament. (Photo by Vasily MAXIMOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of the 2018 World Cup

War is politics by other means — and so is the World Cup.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador gestures after voting during general elections, in Mexico City, on July 1, 2018.

López Obrador Is a Pragmatist, Not an Ideologue

Don’t expect Mexico’s new president to radically shift the country’s approach to foreign policy.

Mexican President Elect Andres Manuel López Obrador speaks after his electoral victory, Mexico City, Mexico, Jul. 1, 2018. (Pedro Mera/Getty Images)

Mexico’s Populist New President Unlikely to Derail Energy Reform

López Obrador won’t reverse the country’s historic oil opening — but he won’t expand it, either.

Brazilian congressman and presidential candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, waves to the crowd during a military event in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 3, 2018.

Latin America’s Center Cannot Hold If It Doesn’t Exist

Mainstream establishment parties across the continent have been replaced by populists offering easy and empty answers.

Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration

State of the Trade Wars

Tracking U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariffs — and the retaliatory measures other countries are taking.

View of supporters of Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, during a campaign rally in Texcoco, state of Mexico. (Alfredo Estrella/AFP)

Why Mexico’s Foreign Policy is About to Turn Left

If populism sweeps to power in Mexico, the country's foreign policy will return to the 1930s.

Fans cheer for Mexico during an international friendly soccer match against Croatia at AT&T Stadium on March 27 in Arlington, Texas.  (Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images)

If Trump Tears Up NAFTA, Sports Will Keep North America Together

The joint 2026 World Cup is yet another sign that Canada, Mexico, and the United States are becoming increasingly culturally and economically interdependent.

The men waging Trump’s trade wars (from left): Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, and White House National Trade Council Director Peter Navarro, in the White House on March 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Trump’s Steel Tariffs on Allies Complicate Bigger Problem: China

Angering Europe, Canada, and Mexico makes it harder to build a common front against Beijing’s trade abuses.

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