Mexico

A Honduran immigrant inspects map of Mexico showing train routes leading north at a shelter for undocumented immigrants on September 14, 2014, in Tenosique, Mexico. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Mexico Can’t Handle Your Tired, Poor, and Huddled Masses

Ever since Donald Trump's election, America's southern neighbor has become a growing destination for migrants—and the country is already buckling under the strain.

Flags with the logo and the World Cup 2018 mascot Zabivaka are seen in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow on June 30, 2018 during the Russia 2018 World Cup football tournament. (Photo by Vasily MAXIMOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of the 2018 World Cup

War is politics by other means — and so is the World Cup.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador gestures after voting during general elections, in Mexico City, on July 1, 2018.

López Obrador Is a Pragmatist, Not an Ideologue

Don’t expect Mexico’s new president to radically shift the country’s approach to foreign policy.

Mexican President Elect Andres Manuel López Obrador speaks after his electoral victory, Mexico City, Mexico, Jul. 1, 2018. (Pedro Mera/Getty Images)

Mexico’s Populist New President Unlikely to Derail Energy Reform

López Obrador won’t reverse the country’s historic oil opening — but he won’t expand it, either.

Brazilian congressman and presidential candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, waves to the crowd during a military event in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 3, 2018.

Latin America’s Center Cannot Hold If It Doesn’t Exist

Mainstream establishment parties across the continent have been replaced by populists offering easy and empty answers.

Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration

State of the Trade Wars

Tracking U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariffs — and the retaliatory measures other countries are taking.

View of supporters of Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, during a campaign rally in Texcoco, state of Mexico. (Alfredo Estrella/AFP)

Why Mexico’s Foreign Policy is About to Turn Left

If populism sweeps to power in Mexico, the country's foreign policy will return to the 1930s.

Fans cheer for Mexico during an international friendly soccer match against Croatia at AT&T Stadium on March 27 in Arlington, Texas.  (Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images)

If Trump Tears Up NAFTA, Sports Will Keep North America Together

The joint 2026 World Cup is yet another sign that Canada, Mexico, and the United States are becoming increasingly culturally and economically interdependent.

The men waging Trump’s trade wars (from left): Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, and White House National Trade Council Director Peter Navarro, in the White House on March 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Trump’s Steel Tariffs on Allies Complicate Bigger Problem: China

Angering Europe, Canada, and Mexico makes it harder to build a common front against Beijing’s trade abuses.

Mexican presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador delivers a speech at a campaign rally in Rio Bravo, Tamaulipas, Mexico, on April 6. (Julio Cesar Ahuilar/AFP/Getty Images)

Andrés Manuel López Obrador Is No Hugo Chávez

The real problem with the Mexican presidential frontrunner isn’t his populism. It’s his old-fashioned ideas.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto during the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S.-Mexico Relationship Has Survived and Thrived Under Trump

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the neighbors are finding ways to make it work.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with steel executives at the White House, where he announced new tariffs, Mar. 1, 2018. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Here Comes Trump’s Trade War

Amid White House turmoil, the president unfurls the "America First" flag, and sees immediate blowback.

Mexican presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a rally in Tijuana, Mexico, on Jan. 30. (Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Mexico Ready for a Populist President?

Andrés Manuel López Obrador's ascension seems like an increasingly good bet.

Canadian Foreign Affairs minister Chrystia Freeland speaks after the close of the sixth round of NAFTA meetings, Jan. 29, 2018. (Peter McCabe/AFP/Getty Images)

Canada and Mexico Prepare for Life After NAFTA

Canada and Mexico aren’t bending to U.S. demands, because they’ve got alternative trading partners.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto at the National Palace in Mexico City on April 24, 2017. (Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images)

Corruption Is Mexico’s Original Sin

Personal enrichment has always been central to Mexico's political system — and only a revolution can change that.

U.S President Donald Trump speaks about his administration's National Security Strategy at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C, Dec. 18.(Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Buckle Up for Year 2 of Trump

Four major crises the president is steering America toward in the year ahead.

The Mexican, U.S., and Canadian flags in Ottawa, Ontario, on Sept. 24.
 (Lars Hagberg/AFP/Getty Images)

America Needs NAFTA to Win

The U.S. economy has grown because of NAFTA. Scuttling it now would do grievous damage.

Rescue teams work amid the ruins of Colegio Enrique Rébsamen in Mexico City on Sept. 20. (Jose Garcia/AFP/Getty Images)T

The Earthquake to Come in Mexico

With a wave of corruption scandals sweeping out Latin American governments, is Mexico's next to fall?

President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on June 21 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Trump spoke about renegotiating NAFTA and building a border wall that would produce solar power during the rally.  (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Can Congress Block Trump if He Pulls Out of NAFTA?

The president claims the decision is his to make. Lawmakers and legal scholars aren’t so sure.

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