Migration/Immigration

Migrants camp on the road in the vicinity of the Maljevac border crossing with neighboring Croatia, near the northern Bosnian town of Velika Kladusa, on Oct. 24, 2018. (Elvis Barukcic/AFP/Getty Images)

In Bosnia, a Migrant Way Station Is Becoming a Winter Prison

For years, the country remained untouched by the global migrant crisis, but now, even in a place where many people were once refugees, tensions are on the rise.

Engineers from the 937th Clearance Company prepare to place concertina wire on the Arizona-Mexico border wall on Dec. 1, 2018. (U.S. Army photo by 2nd Lt. Corey Maisch)

Trump Declares National Emergency in ‘Slap in the Face to Military Families’

The president will divert billions that would have gone to military construction projects.

A view of the border wall between Mexico and the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state, Mexico on Jan. 19, 2018.
(Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump May Have $21 Billion in Military Funds Available for the Wall

The president plans to sign a federal spending bill and declare a national emergency to bankroll his long-promised border wall.

Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as La Bestia in Las Patronas, Veracruz state, Mexico, to travel through Mexico to reach the United States on Aug. 9, 2018. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Isn’t Helping Refugees. It’s Depriving Them of Their Rights.

The humanitarian visas offered to migrants don’t allow them to work, study, or receive benefits while letting the Mexican government duck its responsibilities under international law.

Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization Yasser Arafat addresses delegates of the Organization of African Unity in July 1972 in Kampala, Uganda.

Theresa May Is Negotiating Like Yasser Arafat

The late Palestinian leader was legendary for forsaking promising opportunities, caving to extremists, and failing to appreciate the challenges of negotiating against a stronger opponent. Britain’s prime minister has perfected his diplomatic style.

U.S. President Donald Trump, with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Mike Pence looking on, delivers the State of the Union address at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 5. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Top Foreign-Policy Takeaways From Trump’s State of the Union

What the president said—and didn’t say—about America’s place in the world.

Syrian refugees, stuck between the Jordanian and Syrian borders, wait to cross into Jordan at the Hadalat border crossing on Jan. 14, 2016. (Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

Investing in Low-Wage Jobs Is the Wrong Way to Reduce Migration

Unless would-be migrants can build lives with dignity—which poorly paid, export-oriented jobs do not provide—they will continue to seek ways to move on.

A migrant rides a bike past greenhouses on January 14, 2019. In southern Spain, the far-right party Vox has attracted farmers with its pledge to deport illegal workers.

Spanish Nationalists Hate Separatists, Not Immigrants

Spain has long resisted the rise of the far-right, because Basque and Catalan separatism animated nationalist passions—but the rise of Vox in Andalusia shows that the country is not immune from xenophobic politics.

Angirekula Sreekanth poses for a photograph with a copy of his U.S. visa and those of his relatives at the Chilkur Balaji Temple in Rangareddy district, near Hyderabad, on April 29, 2017.

A New U.S. Immigration Law Would Hurt Iranians the Most

H.R. 392 will help skilled immigrants from India jump the green-card queue—at the expense of everyone else.

Central American migrants—mostly Honduran—taking part in a caravan to the United States through central Mexico on Nov. 11.(Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images)

Pay to Stay?

Why U.S. aid to Central America has not eased the flow of migrants.

Demonstrators gathered in front of the White House to protest U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to terminate temporary protected status for citizens of Sudan, El Salvador, Haiti, and Nicaragua in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 9. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

How One Top Diplomat Took a Stand Against Trump’s Immigration Policy

The under secretary of state feared that canceling the temporary protected status for some immigrants would be a blight on U.S. foreign policy.

Lillian Ochan, a 23-year-old refugee from Ethiopia, buys food items using bamba chakula cash from a shop in Kenya’s Kalobeyei settlement, village 2, in Kakuma on May 21. (World Food Programme/Martin Karimi)

Refuge, Reformed

Kenya has found a way to make refugee camps benefit host communities. Other countries should follow its lead.

Members of the environmental group Greenpeace hold up a sign calling for Australia to allow refugee children to stay in the country in Sydney on February 14, 2016, after a hospital in Brisbane refused to send an asylum-seeker baby back to detention on Nauru.

Australia’s Draconian Refugee Policy Comes Home to Roost

The government has gone to great lengths to keep asylum-seekers from its shores. Now it might have to accept some of them after all.

Conservative member of Parliament Jacob Rees-Mogg speaks to the media after submitting a letter of no confidence in Prime Minister Theresa May  on November 15, 2018 in London.

Will the Tories Sacrifice Theresa May to Survive?

Britain’s prime minister is fighting a three-front battle to save her Brexit deal. Most of the party claims to support her, but the prospect of losing power to Jeremy Corbyn might motivate Conservatives to replace their leader.

Santos Rodriguez, a 70-year-old Honduran, walks through a cornfield affected by the drought in San Buenaventura on Aug. 15. (Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images)

The Hungry Caravan

Violence isn’t the only reason migrants are fleeing Central America. A four-year drought has destroyed harvests and lives—and has pushed the hungry northward.

A Halloween-themed citizenship ceremony for children at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 31, 2017. (Photo by Drew Angerer/ Getty Images).

Trump’s Birthright Blitz

The Supreme Court already settled the birthright dispute—in 1898.

Italy's populist Five Star Movement leader Luigi Di Maio (R) with party members Roberto Fico (L) and Alessandro Di Battista (C) after an election campaign meeting in Piazza del Popolo in Rome on March 2, 2018.

Italy’s Left-Wing Populists Won’t Stop the Far-Right. They’ll Strengthen It.

The Five Star Movement’s most prominent leftist, Alessandro Di Battista, is returning to politics, but don’t expect him to reverse the government’s anti-immigrant agenda.

Honduran migrants, heading in a caravan toward the United States, walk in Metapa, Mexico, on Oct. 22. (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s System for Resettling Refugees Benefits the United States

By dismantling it, Trump would leave the country—and refugees—worse off.

Demonstrators march in Sydney during a protest to demand humane treatment of asylum-seekers and refugees on July 21. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s First Immigration Economy

Australia’s economy is addicted to immigration, requiring ever-increasing infusions of new people to stave off an inevitable collapse.

LONDON - JULY 18:  In this photo illustration a pregnant woman is seen stood at the office work station on July 18, 2005 in London, England. Under plans to revise paid maternity leave, an exteneded period of six to nine months will be offered for maternity leave from 2007. (Photo illustration by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

Immigrant Labor or Working Mothers?

Countries facing labor shortages tend to focus on one or the other—but it doesn’t have to be a choice.

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